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HANGMAN GAME # 229
1 year ago
| HANGMAN GAME/ANSWERS

 

 

 

 


HAVE FUN!!!!!


SINCE WE ALWAYS HAVE NEW MEMBERS - HERE ARE THE RULES - YOU CAN ONLY GUESS 1X BEFORE NYACK COMES BACK WITH THE ANSWERS AS TO WHICH LETTERS ARE CORRECT.


HOWEVER IF YOU REALLY THINK YOU KNOW THE ANSWER - YOU CAN GUESS - BUT PLEASE DON'T GUESS UNLESS YOU ARE PRETTY SURE - IT MESSES THINGS UP IF YOU GUESS PART OF IT AND NOT ALL OF IT - THEN I

1 year ago

Just the common name this time. HAVE FUN!

 

 

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   _ _ _ _ _

 

 

Letters available

 

A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,R,S,T,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

1 year ago

Good afternoon, Nyack. May I have an E, please?

Anonymous
1 year ago

Good evening Nyack and Lynn.

T please.

1 year ago

Good Evening All How about A Nyack please

1 year ago

OOOps!! I meant how about the letter A Nyack please

1 year ago

lol@ A Barbara

 

Letters Guessed

E, T, A

 

 

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   _ _ A _ E

 

 

Letters available

 

B,C,D,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,R,S,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

1 year ago

Might know the last word...could I pleeeeze have an H??

1 year ago

Letters Guessed

E, T, A, H

 

 

_ H _ _ _ _ _ _   _ _ A _ E

 

 

Letters available

 

B,C,D,F,G,I,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,R,S,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

Anonymous
1 year ago

Kim that's what I thought!!

C please Nyack.

1 year ago

Phooey!! Okay, new tack, I'll try....an S!!

1 year ago

Happy Independence Day!

 

Letters Guessed

E, T, A, H, C, S

 

 

_ H _ _ _ _ _ _   C _ A _ E

 

 

Letters available

 

B,D,F,G,I,J,K,L,M,N,O,P,Q,R,U,V,W,X,Y,Z

Anonymous
1 year ago

Whooping Crane......I hope it is this as I love the name!!

1 year ago

  CONGRATULATIONS, BRENDA!

 

 

Protect Whooping Cranes

 

PETITION:

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/595/818/913/protect-whooping-cranes/

 

  • Target: President Barack Obama, Ken Salazar, Secretary of Interior
  • Sponsored by: Animal Advocates

The proposed 1700-mile Keystone pipeline XL would destroy vulnerable habitats and harm many endangered creatures.

 

The open pit mines of the destructive tar sands in Alberta, (that currently courses through two existing pipelines that crisscross our country), is hampering international efforts to protect endangered and threatened species. It is harming threatened woodland caribou and at least 130 migratory bird species, including endangered whooping cranes.

 

Endangered whooping cranes are particularly vulnerable. The entire global population of wild, migratory whooping cranes migrates through the tar sands region twice annually. The birds land in toxic wastewater pits, mistaking them for freshwater ponds.

 

Habitat disruption and fragmentation are the driving forces of the population’s decline. We ask for a full investigation to determine whether tar sands activities are violating treaties that protect endangered and threatened species before there is "appoval" of the pipeline to proceed through the length of the United States.

 

President Barack Obama

The White House

1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW

Washington, DC 20500

Phone: (202)456.1111
Fax: (202)456-2461

Email: http://www.whitehouse.gov/contact/

 

Ken Salazar

Secretary of the Interior
U.S. Department of the Interior
1849 C Street, N.W. / Washington DC 20240
feedback@ios.doi.gov
Secretary_of_the_Interior@ios.doi.gov

 

 

PETITION:

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/595/818/913/protect-whooping-cranes/

1 year ago

 

Whooping Crane

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whooping_Crane

 

The Whooping Crane (Grus americana), the tallest North American bird, is an endangered crane species named for its whooping sound. Along with the Sandhill Crane, it is one of only two crane species found in North America. The Whooping Crane's lifespan is estimated to be 22 to 24 years in the wild. After being pushed to the brink of extinction by unregulated hunting and loss of habitat to just 21 wild and two captive Whooping Cranes by 1941, conservation efforts have led to a limited recovery. As of 2011, there are an estimated 437 birds in the wild and more than 165 in captivity.

 

 

In 1957, the Whooping Crane was featured on a U.S. postage stamp supporting wildlife conservation.

1 year ago

 

DESCRIPTION

An adult Whooping Crane is white with a red crown and a long, dark, pointed bill. Immature Whooping Cranes are cinnamon brown. While in flight, their long necks are kept straight and their long dark legs trail behind. Adult Whooping Cranes' black wing tips are visible during flight.

The species can stand up to 1.5 meters (5 feet) and have a wingspan of 2.3 meters (7.5 feet). Males weigh on average 7.3 kg (16 lb), while females weigh 6.2 kg (14 lb) on average (Erickson, 1976). The body length averages about 132 cm (52 in). The standard linear measurements of the Whooping cranes are a wing chord length of 53–63 cm (21–25 in), an exposed culmen length of 11.7–16 cm (4.6–6.3 in) and a tarsus of 26–31 cm (10–12 in). The only other very large, long-legged white birds in North America are: the Great Egret, which is over a foot shorter and one-seventh the weight of this crane; the Great White Heron, which is a morph of the Great Blue Heron in Florida; and the Wood Stork. All three other birds are at least 30% smaller than the whooping crane. Herons and storks are also quite different in structure from the crane.

Their calls are loud and can carry several kilometers wide. They express "guard calls" for warning their partner about any potential danger, the crane pair will jointly call ("unison call") in a very rhythmic and impressive way in the early morning (after waking up), after courtship and for defending their territory. The first unison call every recorded in the wild was taken in the Whooping Cranes' wintering area in the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge in December 1999.

 

 

1 year ago

CONSERVATION EFFORTS

The Whooping Crane was declared endangered in 1967. Although believed to be naturally rare, the crane has suffered major population deprivations due to habitat destruction and over-hunting. The population has gone to an estimated 10,000+ birds before the settling of Europeans on the continent to 1,300-1,400 birds by 1870 to 15 adults by 1938. The current population is approximately 382.

During the past two years, five Whooping Cranes in the Eastern population, which numbers about 100 in total, have been illegally shot and killed. One of the dead cranes was the female ("First Mom") who was the first captive raised and released whooper to successfully raise, along with her mate, a chick to adulthood in the wild in the East, in 2006. This was a particular blow to that population because whoopers in the East do not yet have an established successful breeding situation. Various agencies and individuals have offered rewards for the apprehension of the persons responsible.

Although the individuals responsible for the deaths of four of the cranes have not yet been apprehended, on March 30, 2011, Wade Bennett, 18, of Cayuga, Indiana and an unnamed juvenile pled guilty to killing First Mom. After killing the crane, the juvenile had posed holding up its body. Bennett and the juvenile were sentenced to a $1 fine, probation, and court fees of about $500, a penalty which was denounced by various conservation organizations as being too light. The prosecuting attorney has estimated that the cost of raising and introducing to the wild one Whooping Crane could be as much as $100,000.

In October 2011, two juveniles were apprehended for shooting to death two of the first ten Whooping Cranes in an experimental Jefferson Davis parish, Louisiana, non-migratory population

 

Conservation Efforts (continued)
1 year ago
  • One project by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service and the Canadian Wildlife Service was initiated in 1975 involved cross-fostering with Sandhill Cranes to establish a second self-sustaining flock. Although 85 chicks from the 289 Whooping Crane eggs transplanted into Sandhill Crane nests learned to migrate, the Whooping Cranes failed to mate with other Whooping Cranes due to imprinting on their Sandhill foster parents; the project was discontinued in 1989. No members of this population survive. This effort and the problem of imprinting is explored in the 1976 documentary A Great White Bird.
  • A second involved the establishment of a non-migratory population near Kissimmee, Florida by a cooperative effort led by the U.S. and Canadian Whooping Crane Recovery Team in 1993. As of December 18, 2006, this population numbered about 53 birds, but a decision was made not to introduce further birds into this population until problems with high mortality and lack of reproduction are resolved, and as of May 2011, the population had shrunk to 20 cranes.
  • A third attempt has involved reintroducing the Whooping Crane to a new flyway established east of the Mississippi river. This project uses isolation rearing of young Whooping Cranes and trains them to follow ultralight aircraft, a method of re-establishing migration routes pioneered by Bill Lishman and Joe Duff when they led Canada Geese in migration from Ontario, Canada, to Virginia and South Carolina in 1993. The non-profit organization which is responsible for the ultralight migrations is Operation Migration, and the larger group, WCEP (the Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership), oversees all aspects of the Eastern Introduced Flock. They are now also releasing fledged cranes directly into the established population, to learn the migratory behavior from their peers (Direct Autumn Release). One Whooping Crane from the Eastern Migratory Population (EMP) has been the recipient of special attention from conservationists for several years. This crane was given the name "Number 16-05" because he was the sixteenth Whooping Crane to be tracked and tagged in 2005. That year, #16-05 collided with an ultralight plane, and because of an injury resulting from this collision, he missed the autumn portion of that year's northern migration. He also had difficulty flying during his juvenile winter, however, he exhibited no flying impairment during the spring migration.
Conservation Efforts (continued)
1 year ago

Subsequent to hatching, the Operation Migration cranes are taught to follow their ultralight aircraft, fledged over their future breeding territory in Wisconsin, and led by ultralight on their first migration from Wisconsin to Florida; the birds learn the migratory route and then return, on their own, the following spring. This reintroduction began in fall 2001 and has added birds to the population in each subsequent year (Except that in early 2007, a disastrous storm killed all of the 2006 yearlings after their arrival in Florida.)
As of May, 2011, there were 105 surviving Whooping Cranes in the Eastern Migratory Population (EMP), including seventeen that had formed pairs, several of which are nesting and are incubating eggs. Two Whooping Crane chicks were hatched from one nest, on June 22, 2006. Their parents are both birds that were hatched and led by ultralight on their first migration in 2002. The chicks are the first Whooping Cranes hatched in the wild, of migrating parents, east of the Mississippi, in over 100 years. One of these young chicks was unfortunately predated on the Necedah National Wildlife Refuge. The other young chick, a female, has successfully migrated with her parents to Florida. As noted above, in early February, 2007, 17 yearlings in a group of 18 were killed by the 2007 Central Florida tornadoes. All birds in that flock were believed to have died in the storms, but then a signal from one of the transmitters, "Number 15-06", indicated that it had survived. The bird was subsequently relocated in the company of some Sandhill Cranes. It died in late April from an as yet unknown cause, possibly related to the storm trauma. Two of the 4 DAR Whooper chicks from 2006 were also lost due to predation. However, as of December, 2010, 105 birds had become established in the eastern United States population.

In Wood Buffalo National Park, the Canadian Wildlife Service counted 73 mating pairs in 2007. They produced 80 chicks, of which 40 survived to the fall migration, and 39 completed the migration to Aransas National Wildlife Refuge. In May 2011, there were 78 mating pairs and 279 total birds.

Anonymous
1 year ago

Signed petition, thanks Nyack.

1 year ago

Congratulations once again, Brenda! Nyack, I signed the petition and read the information. It's amazing how they are taught to follow the ultracraft and then know how to follow the route by themselves the following year. Smart cranes!

Anonymous
1 year ago

Thanks Lynn.

1 year ago

Congratulations Brenda Signed and noted the information Nyack Thanx

Anonymous
1 year ago

Thanks Barbara.

1 year ago

Congrats, Brenda! That was a good one!! Petition signed for sure! Thanks Nyack!

Anonymous
1 year ago

Thanks Kim.