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Tiger Sub-Species Overview/Index
1 year ago
Tiger Sub-Species Overview/Index

While there is one species known as the tiger (panthera tigris), there have been a total of nine 
subspecies divided by geographic range resulting in slight evolutionary variations in the form of size, colour, stripe formation and fur length.

Three of these subspecies are confirmed as extinct.  They are:

Bali Tiger  (panthera tigris balica) which existed on the Indonesian Island of Bali.  

Caspian Tiger  (panthera tigris virgata) which ranged through Central Asiatic Russia, Afghanistan, Iran,  Iraq, Turkey, Mongolia as well as Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan.

Javan Tiger  (panthera tigris sondaica) which lived on the island of Java in Indonesia.

The five confirmed existing subspecies are:

Amur Tiger  (panthera tigris altaica) is found in Far Eastern Russia and possibly Northern China.

Bengal Tiger  (panthera tigris tigris) ranges through Bhutan, Bangladesh, India and Nepal.

Indochinese Tiger (panthera tigris corbetti) lives in Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam and possibly Southern China.

Malayan Tiger  (panthera tigris jacksoni) exists in Malaysia.

Sumatran Tiger (panthera tigris sumatrae) is found on the Indonesian island of Sumatra.

There is doubt about the status of:

South China Tiger (panthera tigris amoyensis) has had no recent sightings in the wild.

Tigers can exist in varied range of habitat. Please follow the links for more detail on each subspecies.

The official taxonomy of the tiger:

Subphylum:  vertebrata

Class:  mammalia

Subclass:  eutheria

Order:  carnivora

Family:  felidae

Subfamily:  panthernae

Genus:  panthera

Species:  tigris

Subspecies:  as above  

CONTINUED:
1 year ago

The Bali Tiger



Status:  Extinct  

Scientific Name:
  Panthera tigris balica

Range:  The island of Bali in Indonesia.

Habitat:  Mountain jungle areas with base prey of deer (Rusa), boar, jungle fowl and monitor lizards.

Facts & Thoughts:
The Bali tiger was the smallest of the tiger subspecies with a distinctive pattern which sometimes 
included small spots between stripes.  The last confirmed sighting was thought to be in 1937 with 
unconfirmed sightings continuing up to 1972.  Hunting was the main reason for the demise of the Bali tiger, decimating what was likely to be a small population in the confined space of the island.  Despite the close proximity to the Javan tiger, the Bali tiger developed a distinct appearance after the separation of the two islands during the ice age.



This post was modified from its original form on 19 Jun, 10:25
1 year ago

Caspian Tiger



Status:  Extinct

Scientific Name:  Panthera tigris virgata

Also known as:  Hyrcanian tiger, Mazandaran tiger, Turanian tiger, Persian tiger

Range:  Central Asiatic Russia, Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq, Turkey, Mongolia, Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan.




Habitat: Lowland forests, river and lake basins where there was a healthy prey base of mainly deer and boar.

Facts & Thoughts:
Often referred to as a smaller version of the Amur tiger, the Caspian tiger represents one of the truly disastrous episodes of animal-human conflict.   The Caspian was declared a pest in many parts of its range in the early 20th century as large land reclamations took place and was subsequently slaughtered.  It is generally recognized the last Caspian tiger died in the 1960s but there have been unconfirmed sightings right through into the 90s.  In 2010, Russia exchanged 2 captive Amur Tigers for Persian Leopards with the Iran Government, in an  agreement on restocking these animals back into the wild within the next 5 years. As there has been no successful rewilding of tigers anywhere thus far there is doubt about this project succeeding.

Bali Tigers
1 year ago

This country's Government need to come forward to Protect this extra ordinary animals. If the government does not have a back bone to stand up the rest of the civilians will destroy the planet earths most wonderful animals to extinction. STOP the stupid Hunt of these animals instead bring the tougher laws to protect them. Punish the people who go against the laws.

1 year ago

The Javan Tiger




Status:  Extinct

Scientific Name:  Panthera tigris sondaica

Range:  The Indonesian island of Java.

Habitat: Forested areas throughout the island but as deforestation grew the Javan tiger retreated to more mountainous areas with a prey base of ungulates including Rusa deer and wild boar.

Facts & Thoughts:
One of the smaller subspecies, the Javan tiger was a victim of human population growth with deforestation and a "pest" status leading to its extinction. The last evidence of the Javan tiger was in 1987 so in all likelihood it was the most recent extinction of a subspecies, although the status of the South China tiger is in dispute. However, in 2008 the unidentified body of a mountain biker was claimed to be the victim of a tiger and there was an unconfirmed sighting in 2009. Despite incidents like these, experts believe it is highly unlikely the Javan tiger still exists and the extinction status has not changed.

Wildcat Info
1 year ago

Thanks for all this Amazing & very informative info Julie it's purr-fect!!!

1 year ago

1.) THE SIBERIAN TIGER (a.k.a. AMUR TIGER)


 photo Amur_Tiger_by_soyrwoo-1.jpg

1.) THE SIBERIAN TIGER
The Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica), also known as the Amur, Manchurian, Altaic, Korean or North China tiger, is confined to the Amur-Ussuri region of Primorsky Krai and Khabarovsk Krai in far eastern Siberia, where it is now protected. Considered the largest subspecies, with a head and body length of 190–230 cm (the tail of a tiger is 60–110 cm long) and an average weight of around 227 kilograms (500 lb) for males, the Amur tiger is also noted for its thick coat, distinguished by a paler golden hue and fewer stripes. The heaviest wild Siberian tiger on record weighed in at 384 kg, but according to Mazak these giants are not confirmed via reliable references. Even so, a six-month old Siberian tiger can be as big as a fully grown leopard. The last two censuses (1996 and 2005) found 450–500 Amur tigers within their single, and more or less continuous, range making it one of the largest undivided tiger populations in the world. Genetic research in 2009 demonstrated that the Siberian tiger, and the western "Caspian tiger" (once thought to have been a separate subspecies that became extinct in the wild in the late 1950's) are actually the same subspecies, since the separation of the two populations may have occurred as recently as the past century due to human intervention.

1 year ago

2.) THE BENGAL TIGER


    photo Bengal_Tiger_by_Tsukoyomi-1.jpg



2.) THE BENGAL TIGER
The Bengal tiger or the Royal Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) is the most common subspecies of tiger and is found primarily in India and Bangladesh. It lives in varied habitats: grasslands, subtropical and tropical rainforests, scrub forests, wet and dry deciduous forests, and mangroves. Males in the wild usually weigh 205 to 227 kg (450–500 lb), while the average female will weigh about 141 kg. However, the northern Indian and the Nepalese Bengal tigers are somewhat bulkier than those found in the south of the Indian Subcontinent, with males averaging around 235 kilograms (520 lb). While conservationists already believed the population to be below 2,000, the most recent audit by the Indian Government's National Tiger Conservation Authority has estimated the number at just 1,411 wild tigers (1165–1657 allowing for statistical error), a drop of 60% in the past decade. Since 1972, there has been a massive wildlife conservation project, known as Project Tiger, to protect the Bengal tiger. Despite increased efforts by Indian officials, poaching remains rampant and at least one Tiger Reserve (Sariska Tiger Reserve) has lost its entire tiger population to poaching.


1 year ago

3.) THE INDOCHINESE TIGER



 photo Relaxing_beauty_by_dennis73-1.jpg

3.) THE INDOCHINESE TIGER
The Indochinese tiger (Panthera tigris corbetti), also called Corbett's tiger, is found in Cambodia, China, Laos, Burma, Thailand, and Vietnam. These tigers are smaller and darker than Bengal tigers: Males weigh from 150–190 kg (330–420 lb) while females are smaller at 110–140 kg (242–308 lb). Their preferred habitat is forests in mountainous or hilly regions. Estimates of the Indochinese tiger population vary between 1,200 to 1,800, with only several hundred left in the wild. All existing populations are at extreme risk from poaching, prey depletion as a result of poaching of primary prey species such as deer and wild pigs, habitat fragmentation and inbreeding. In Vietnam, almost three-quarters of the tigers killed provide stock for Chinese pharmacies.

1 year ago

4.) THE MALAYAN TIGER



 photo Malayan_tiger_loves_water_by_wox-1.jpg

4.) THE MALAYAN TIGER
The Malayan tiger (Panthera tigris jacksoni), exclusively found in the southern part of the Malay Peninsula, was not considered a subspecies in its own right until 2004. The new classification came about after a study by Luo et al. from the Laboratory of Genomic Diversity Study, part of the National Cancer Institute of the United States. Recent counts showed there are 600–800 tigers in the wild, making it the third largest tiger population, behind the Bengal tiger and the Indochinese tiger. The Malayan tiger is the smallest of the mainland tiger subspecies, and the second smallest living subspecies, with males averaging about 120 kg and females about 100 kg in weight. The Malayan tiger is a national icon in Malaysia, appearing on its coat of arms and in logos of Malaysian institutions, such as Maybank.

1 year ago

5.) THE SUMATRAN TIGER



 photo Tiger_02_by_alannahILY-1.jpg

5.) THE SUMATRAN TIGER
The Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) is found only on the Indonesian island of Sumatra, and is critically endangered. It is the smallest of all living tiger subspecies, with adult males weighing between 100–140 kg (220–308 lb) and females 75–110 kg (154–242 lb). Their small size is an adaptation to the thick, dense forests of the island of Sumatra where they reside, as well as the smaller-sized prey. The wild population is estimated at between 400 and 500, seen chiefly in the island's national parks. Recent genetic testing has revealed the presence of unique genetic markers, indicating that it may develop into a separate species, if it does not go extinct. This has led to suggestions that Sumatran tigers should have greater priority for conservation than any other subspecies. While habitat destruction is the main threat to existing tiger population (logging continues even in the supposedly protected national parks), 66 tigers were recorded as being shot and killed between 1998 and 2000, or nearly 20% of the total population.

1 year ago

6.) THE SOUTH CHINA TIGER


*(LIKELY EXTINCT)



 photo Cathay_and_Hope-1.jpg

6.) THE SOUTH CHINA TIGER
The South China tiger (Panthera tigris amoyensis), also known as the Amoy or Xiamen tiger, is the most critically endangered subspecies of tiger and is listed as one of the 10 most endangered animals in the world. One of the smaller tiger subspecies, the length of the South China tiger ranges from 2.2–2.6 m (87–100 in) for both males and females. Males weigh between 127 and 177 kg (280–390 lb) while females weigh between 100 and 118 kg (220–260 lb). From 1983 to 2007, no South China tigers were sighted. In 2007 a farmer spotted a tiger and handed in photographs to the authorities as proof. The photographs in question, however, were later exposed as fake, copied from a Chinese calendar and photoshopped, and the “sighting” turned into a massive scandal.



There is doubt about the status of:

South China Tiger (panthera tigris amoyensis) has had no recent sightings in the wild.

1 year ago

GREAT thread, Julie and Nyack!  LOVE the magnificent tigers! 


1 year ago

Real Fascinating Stuff and such Beautiful photos of Tigers!!  Thanks for the info Julie and Nyack!  xx

1 year ago

Thank you Julie and Nyack for all the info and beautiful photos of the exquisite tigers.

1 year ago

Tigers are so beautiful. Thank you Nyack for the photo's and history of Tigers!

Amazing creatures of the world they are.


 photo Tigers-Lots_zps52f285c0.jpg

1 year ago

AWESOME!!!!!

 

Thnx Nyack and Julie!!!!!

 

LYG's!!!!

 

 

1 year ago
White Siberian tigers

The existence of white Siberian tigers has not been scientifically documented, despite occasional unsubstantiated reports of sightings of white tigers in the regions where wild Siberian tigers live. It may be that the white mutation does not exist in the wild Siberian tiger population: no white Siberian tigers have been born in captivity, despite the fact that the subspecies has been extensively bred during the last few decades (with much outbreeding between the different Siberian lineages for purposes of conservation genetics); a recessive allele should occasionally turn up in a homozygous state during such breeding, and in this particular case yield white tigers from normally-colored parents, but no such animals have been reported.


The famous white Siberian tigers found in captivity are actually not pure Siberian tigers. They are instead the result of Siberian tigers breeding with Bengal tigers. The gene for white coating is quite common among Bengal tigers, but the natural birth of a white Bengal tiger is still a very rare occasion in the wild, where white tigers are not bred selectively.


The white tiger is not considered a tiger subspecies, but rather a mutant variant of the existing tiger subspecies. If a pure white Siberian tiger were to be born, it would therefore not be selectively bred within the tiger conservation programs. It would, however, probably still be selectively bred outside the program in an effort to create more white Siberian tigers. Due to the popularity of white tigers, they are used to attract visitors to zoos.

1 year ago
Stripeless White Tigers 

An additional genetic condition can remove most of the striping of a white tiger, making the animal almost pure white. One such specimen was exhibited at Exeter Change in England in 1820, and described by Georges Cuvier as "A white variety of Tiger is sometimes seen, with the stripes very opaque, and not to be observed except in certain angles of light." Naturalist Richard Lydekker said that, "a white tiger, in which the fur was of a creamy tint, with the usual stripes faintly visible in certain parts, was exhibited at the old menagerie at Exeter Change about the year 1820." Hamilton Smith said, "A wholly white tiger, with the stripe-pattern visible only under reflected light, like the pattern of a white tabby cat, was exhibited in the Exeter Change Menagerie in 1820.", and John George Wood stated that, "a creamy white, with the ordinary tigerine stripes so faintly marked that they were only visible in certain lights." Edwin Henry Landseer also drew this tigress in 1824.

The modern strain of snow white tigers came from repeated brother–sister matings of Bhim and Sumita at Cincinnati Zoo. The gene involved may have come from a Siberian tiger, via their part-Siberian ancestor Tony.


Continued inbreeding appears to have caused a recessive gene for stripelessness to show up. About one fourth of Bhim and Sumita's offspring were stripeless. Their striped white offspring, which have been sold to zoos around the world, may also carry the stripeless gene. Because Tony's genome is present in many white tiger pedigrees, the gene may also be present in other captive white tigers. As a result, stripeless white tigers have appeared in zoos as far afield as the Czech RepublicSpain and Mexico. Stage magicians Siegfried & Roy were the first to attempt to selectively breed tigers for stripelessness; they owned snow-white Bengal tigers taken from Cincinnati Zoo (Tsumura, Mantra, Mirage and Akbar-Kabul) and GuadalajaraMexico (Vishnu and Jahan), as well as a stripeless Siberian tiger called Apollo.

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