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Amphibian Slideshow. ~ Photos & Info.~ from Junee.
1 year ago
| Cool

 

21
Dragons, Snakes and Toilet Frogs: Wildlife on Your Doorstep - in Pictures

Offbeat  (tags: animals, wildlife, world, pictures )
Zora - 48 minutes ago - theguardian.com
We asked you to share your July pictures of the animals around the world with which we share our outdoor spaces. Here's our pick of the best scaly reptiles and slimy amphibians - from water dragons to tree frogs.
1 year ago

thanks for sharing Vinnie + Zora

 

Thx. Junee..
1 year ago

Ooh, Cool Junee. Did you get that photo from the Gallery in the Billboard ?  What is their Name ?  Are they two guys facing off ?  Or a Male and a Female? Looks like to me the one on the bottom ( No Pun Intended)    is giving the other one a glassy eyed  "Come Hither  Big Boy" look.     Darn Thunderstorms again. I gotta go Fruddys from me and a Dottie feeling a little better. xoxo

1 year ago

No Vinnie found it in a newspaper article just said they were colourful tree frogs. Keep finding pics but never know were to put them    



This post was modified from its original form on 28 Aug, 6:22
Well, Junee
1 year ago

Whenever you feel like Sharing a pretty or cool picture with us just Post under  "New Topic".  or you can post in the Play-Date which continues evn tho my birthday is over because so many people find it relaxing so I thought I'd keep it up. Yes, still for Fur-babys of any kind Dead or Alive. We'd love to hear about them Fruddys.

1 year ago

Thanks Vinnie would it be ok to do a Frog thread to put pics + info in? Have found out so many interesting info since joining would love to share

Sure Junee...
1 year ago

Let's just continue it Here. I changed the Name of this Thread just for you Cutie for Winking at me.   Fruddy Buddys, from me and Dottie who is feeling better. xoxo

Junee
1 year ago

Well, it was about time I put some Frog pictures in the Play-Date but it's mostly for Pets and silly animal photos. I left the one you posted because people have already commented on it. But this Thread is just for you and anyone else too. When it gets too long I'll start another Thread. o.k ? Thanks for all you do..xo

any one else is here..hehe.... hiya pals
1 year ago

Great news that auld Dottie's getting better Vinnie

 

Dashing looking frog up there June, braw colours..fur posting

Thanks Vinnie ♥
1 year ago

Bullfrogs don't only snack on flies—they'll eat almost anything that will fit in their mouths!

 

http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/kids/animals-pets-kids/amphibians-kids/frog-bull-kids/

1 year ago

Did You Know?

The world's tiniest frogs are smaller than a dime, and the largest frog can grow to be longer than a foot and weigh more than 7 pounds!

 

Did You Know?

Frogs don't need to drink the way we do: they absorb water through their permeable skin!

1 year ago

tried to post some pics but for some reason care2 not letting me? will try again tomorrow

1 year ago

Frogs are amphibians, which comes from the Greek language and means "both lives." Most frogs are born in water as tadpoles and gradually change into frogs although some frogs, known as direct developers, are born as full frogs. This allows them to be born and live far away from water, such as on mountaintops. 

A frog mainly lives on insects and small animals like earthworms, minnows and spiders.

There are approximately 4,740 species of frogs around the entire world. There are about 90 species of frogs in the United States. Unfortunately, about 120 amphibian species, including frogs, toads and salamanders, have disappeared since 1980. Historically, one species of amphibian would disappear every 250 years.

Frogs can be found on every continent in the world except Antarctica. However, the highest concentration of frogs is found in warmer tropical climes.

Frogs are known as indicator species and can give scientists valuable insight into how an ecosystem is functioning. Because they are predators and prey many animals are affected by them, frogs provide insight into the health of the ecosystem.

Blue Poison Dart Frogs
1 year ago

Photo: Two bright blue frogs

 

Blue poison dart frogs lack toe webbing and are poor swimmers, so they are never found in the water.

Wallace's Flying Frog
1 year ago

Photo: A Wallace's flying frog on a lichen-covered branch

 

The overachieving Wallace's flying frog wasn't content to just hop and swim. Thousands of years of watching birds navigate the rain forest and avoid predators by taking to the sky appears to have convinced this unique amphibian that air travel is the way to go.

Also known as parachute frogs, Wallace's flying frogs inhabit the dense tropical jungles of Malaysia and Borneo. They live almost exclusively in the trees, descending only to mate and lay eggs.

When threatened or in search of prey, they will leap from a branch and splay their four webbed feet. The membranes between their toes and loose skin flaps on their sides catch the air as they fall, helping them to glide, sometimes 50 feet (15 meters) or more, to a neighboring tree branch or even all the way to the ground. They also have oversized toe pads to help them land softly and stick to tree trunks.

Wallace's flying frogs are not the only frogs who have developed this ability, but they are among the largest. The black color of their foot webbing helps distinguish them from their similarly aerial cousins

They are generally bright green with yellow sides and grow to about 4 inches (10 centimeters). They survive mainly on insects.

The Wallace's flying frog population is considered stable, and they have special status only in certain localities. However, they are partial to breeding and laying eggs in the fetid wallowing holes of the nearly extinct Asian rhinoceros, and further decreases in rhino populations may negatively affect the species.

1 year ago

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1 year ago

Epic Frog

1 year ago

So cute June, thanks for the laugh!

Frog Calls
1 year ago

Here's a diverse set of calling frogs. It is not a complete collection for any place in particular, just species we happen to have sounds for. All but one species is North American (can you find the one that isn't?). Click on the call to play the sound, or on Species Account to see more information about that species.

 

http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/collections/frog_calls/

1 year ago

These are so interesting! I love seeing the picture of the frog together with their calls. thanks, June

1 year ago

Sarah glad you enjoyed them

1 year ago

Great posting June, very interesting and colourful.

1 year ago

A group of male moor frogs

A group of male moor frogs

 

Frogs and toads are the most diverse and widespread of the three amphibian orders. Unlike the other amphibians, adult frogs and toads have no tails but they do have many adaptations to jumping, for example long hind legs, elongated ankle bones and a short vertebral column. Many frogs contain mild toxins, but some, such as the poison dart frogs, are deadly.

Australasian tree frogs
1 year ago

Australasian tree frogs are found in Australia, New Guinea and the surrounding islands. The number of species is currently believed to be around 150, however, this estimate is continually growing as new species are discovered. There is enormous variation in the colour, size, behaviour and habitat of these tree frogs. For example, some species are almost incapable of climbing, yet others rarely leave the trees.

Six tree frogs sitting on branches



This post was modified from its original form on 21 Sep, 10:24
1 year ago

Very interesting June. love the group of moor frogs and little tree frogs are my favorite. Never knew there was a tree frog that couldn't climb!

1 year ago

The Titicaca water frog (Telmatobius culeus) is the largest truly aquatic frog in the world. It has a broad, flattened head with a round snout and large eyes. Colouration is highly variable between individuals and the back can be olive green, dark green or black, with the underside varying between pearl and white.
The most distinctive feature of the Titicaca water frog is the extremely loose skin which hangs from its neck, legs and stomach, giving it a rather ugly appearance. It has well developed, long hind limbs and webbed digits on the hind feet

Very little is known about reproduction in the Titicaca water frog, although it is thought to take place in the summer

The diet of the Titicaca water frog is mainly composed of amphipods, snails, insects, tadpoles and fish.

The multiple-folded, capillary-rich skin of the Titicaca water frog is a unique adaptation that enables it to remain underwater without needing to surface for air. It possesses greatly reduced lungs, which are rarely used except when there is too little oxygen in the water or on the rare occasions when the frog is on land. When in poorly oxygenated water this species performs a movement to pass more water over the folds in its skin, allowing more oxygen to diffuse into the blood.  Another adaptation to its high-altitude habitat is its high red blood cell count and the small size of its red blood cells, which help the blood to deliver oxygen to the body tissues and remove carbon dioxide more efficiently.

The Titicaca water frog is endemic to Lake Titicaca, which lies on the border between Peru and Bolivia.

Lake Titicaca is a cold, oxygen-saturated lake at an elevation of around 3,810 metres. The surface temperature of the lake ranges between 11 and 17 degrees Celsius and the bottom temperature is a constant 10 degrees Celsius. The Titicaca water frog usually prefers the shallower areas of the lake, where it shelters among the reed beds. It is also found in the small ponds and rivers in the vicinity of Lake Titicaca, as well as on the rock ledges on the edges of the water.

The Titicaca water frog is classified as Critically Endangered (CR) on the IUCN Red List.

Titicaca water frog

1 year ago

Whit an amazing frog June. Very interesting post buddy.

1 year ago

wow, the Titicaca water frog looks amazing, i've never seen any frog like that! it's a shame they're Critically Endangered. i would like to know why, but i'm assuming it's mankind's doing--what else is new. real shame. thanks for sharing.

OMG..Junee..
1 year ago

Yes, I seen that Titicaca Frog on National Geographic Channel. But he isn't the handsomest fellow around.   Did you know ( caca ) means Poop in Spanish ?   Just got on and am tired. Have so much to catch up with since I couldn't get on for days. Junee, Start a New Topic for more pictures. This one is getting long. I'll name the Thread tomorrow. Lovely photos and thanks for posting. Fruddys Hugs to all. Like your new Avatar, Gysele..xoxo

1 year ago

Very interesting June, and no he's not very handsome. Yes I'm from Calif. Vinnie, knew what caca meant, thought everyone knew what that meant!?

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