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Jilly posted this in at the Thistle
1 year ago
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Thought it wid be ok to post it here to!
Hugs fruddy buddy's
 
 
 
 

Toads

Common Frog. © Laurie Campbell/SNH For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Libary on tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.org.ukPalmate-01.jpg (Palmate Newt) (gateway) - Palmate Newt. ©Lorne Gill/SNH. For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.org.uk

Protected species - Amphibians and reptiles What are they?

Collectively amphibians and reptiles are also referred to as herptiles.  There are six species of amphibian found in Scotland; the common toad, the natterjack toad, the common frog, the smooth newt, the palmate newt, and the great crested newt.

There are three common species of reptile found on land in Scotland; the adder, the slow worm, and the common lizard.  Additionally there is a colony of sand lizards on the Island of Coll and several species of marine turtle have been recorded around our coast.

How are they protected?

Great crested newts, natterjack toads, sand lizards, and all marine turtles are listed as European protected species and are fully protected under the act, This lists a number of offences in relation to these species and the places in which they live.

All of the other species listed are given limited protection under the Wildlife Countryside Act 1981 (as amended).

Offences in relation to great crested newts, natterjack toads, sand lizards and marine turtles

The following provides a summary of the offences in the Conservation Regulations 1994 in relation to great crested newts, natterjack toads, sand lizards and marine turtles. 

It is an offence to deliberately or recklessly:

  • capture, injure or kill a wild animal of these species;
  • disturb such animals whilst using any structure or place it uses for shelter or protection (e.g. a breeding pond, a hibernation site); 
  • obstruct access to a breeding site or resting place of such an animal or to otherwise deny the animal use of that site;
  • disturb such an animal in a manner that is, or in circumstances which are, likely to significantly affect the local distribution or abundance of that species;
  • disturb such an animal in a manner that is, or in circumstances which are, likely to impair its ability to survive, breed or reproduce, or rear or otherwise care for its young.

It is also an offence to:

  • damage or destroy a breeding site or resting place of such an animal (note that this does not need to be deliberate or reckless to constitute an offence);
  • keep, transport, sell or exchange or offer for sale or exchange any of these species or any part or derivative of one (if obtained after May 1994).


This post was modified from its original form on 18 Sep, 7:56
1 year ago

Yes, Sweetie, this was the right place to post this. I'll go send Jilly a greenstar from the Thistle if I have time to stop in today or over the next few days. O.k ? Thanks for posting. I see my Labour Day picture disappeard so I have to re-post it. Still problems with photos albums. Fruddy Hugs. xoxo

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