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Amphibian Photos & Info. Part 2..
6 months ago
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I'm stuck... I need to be toad away: Rat rescued from the middle of a pond after hitching a lift on a frog

 

Unusual animal alliance photographed in a pond in Lucknow, India

The rat was clinging on to debris but made it to the shore thanks to the help of the frog

 

These extraordinary pictures show an unusual animal alliance as a frog carries a rat across a pond, saving the rodent from a watery grave.
The rat had been clinging to debris as it struggled to stay afloat in the pond in Lucknow, in northern India, and welcomed the assistance of a more aquatic creature.
The friendship is reminiscent of The Wind in the Willows, the beloved children's book in which Ratty helps Mr Toad reclaim his ancestral home.

Odd couple: A rat was pictured in India hitching a lift across a pond on the back of a frog

Odd couple: A rat was pictured in India hitching a lift across a pond on the back of a frog

Don't look now! The rodent was struggling to stay afloat before the intervention of the friendly frog

Don't look now! The rodent was struggling to stay afloat before the intervention of the friendly frog

 

Photographer Azam Husain managed to capture the unique moment as he was hanging out next to the water.
'I had parked my scooter on the shore near the pond,' he said. 'I noticed something floating and soon realised it was the rat holding onto some piece of debris.

'It was as if the two creatures were talking in their own way. The next moment, the rat managed to climb onto the back of the frog.
'All this happened very fast. I quickly reached for my bag and took out my camera.'

Unusual: The alliance is reminiscent of beloved children's book The Wind in the Willows

Triumph: The pair eventually made it to the shore of the pond, saving the rat's life

Triumph: The pair eventually made it to the shore of the pond, saving the rat's life

 

The frog proceeded to dive into the water, carrying his passenger on the back, and made it to the shore.
Mr Husain said: 'I managed to take a few pictures. I was fascinated with the way the frog swam and the rat held on tight. They were like friends.
'Sadly, I could not catch the moment when the frog reached the shore and rat just sped away.
'I looked around for a bit but both the little creatures had just gone back to their world.'

 

6 months ago

That is just amazing June! So glad Mr. Husain had his camera with him, you'll never see anything like this again. Thanks!

Good or Bad ?
6 months ago

Well this fellow was lucky. In some parts of India, they pay for people to kill them. In some areas of India, they are worshiped. And in the Phillipines I saw on Nat. Geo. Channel where they gave up and just let the rats get fattened up on their rice fields then eat the rats. Yuck !! Thanks for the post Junee. Fruddy Hugs from me and Dottie. xoxo



This post was modified from its original form on 10 Oct, 14:34
5 months ago

Panama's Golden Frogs

 

5 months ago

5 months ago

Frog Legs: A British Innovation

New Discovery in England Sheds Light on Who Ate Frogs First

For better or worse, frogs are often associated with the French.
But now, sacre bleu! A team of archaeologists has recently discovered remains of one such amphibian—which had obviously been cooked in some manner—at an ancient site in Wiltshire, England, not far from Stonehenge.
The bone fragments were dated to nearly 10,000 years ago. "That's well before the first documentation of the French eating frog," says dig leader David Jacques of the University of Buckingham. "The earliest source for the French eating frogs legs is in The Annals of the Catholic Church from the 12th century."
The history of the frog as human food is murky at best. But Jacques says it's not surprising that hunter-gatherers would have eaten small animals like frogs and toads. "It may well be that they were a source of useful protein then and a convenient 'fast food' to cook."
So how did such humble fare end up on the most refined menus? Cookbook recipes indicate that frog legs were a part of haute cuisine as far back as the 18th century in France, says French food writer Benedict Beauge. But how they got there is hard to decipher, in part because few cookbooks were written in centuries past about food for the masses.
What is better understood is England's reputation for not liking frog. In the Oxford Companion to Food, author Alan Davidson (a Brit) writes that frog is "perceived by the English as a staple of the French diet." He adds: "Why the idea of eating frog should be repellent to the English in particular is mildly puzzling. It may have something to do with the ugly (to human beings) appearance of the creatures, or the thought that they emerge all slimy from evil-smelling ponds."
This notion is echoed in Larousse Gastronomique, which says frog legs have "usually filled the British with disgust."
Still, some culinary records do offer proof of frog being enjoyed in Britain.
For example, in his 17th-century cookbook The Accomplisht Cook, Englishman Robert May included a recipe for a pie made with live frogs that would "cause much delight" and spur the ladies to "skip and shreek."
And Larousse Gastronomique notes that when 19th-century chef Georges Auguste Escoffier worked at the Carlton Hotel in London, he convinced the Prince of Wales to allow frog legs at his table by calling them cuisses de nymphes aurore—legs of the dawn nymphs.
Not surprisingly, archaeologist Jacques says that his discovery isn't really about who ate frog legs first anyway. "Rather," he says, "it might be worth considering that all the people settled in Britain in the Mesolithic had their origins in France and surrounding areas."
Jacques also noted that Britain was still joined to mainland Europe until around 5500 B.C., when it separated from the continent. "Perhaps we should see this as an opportunity for entente cordiale—we were all French then!"

According to Larousse Gastronomique, the leg is the only part of a frog that's edible.

 

Catherine Zuckerman

National Geographic

Published November 7, 2013

5 months ago

Thank you for the beautiful post, June

Wish a nice weekend to ALL FROGGIES !!

And less of what doesn't!

5 months ago

A common toad adopting a defensive stance

 The European common toad (Bufo bufo) adopts a characteristic stance when attacked, inflating its body and standing with its hindquarters raised and its head lowered.The bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) crouches down with eyes closed and head tipped forward when threatened. This places the parotoid glands in the most effective position, the other glands on its back begin to ooze noxious secretions and the most vulnerable parts of its body are protected.Another tactic used by some frogs is to "scream", the sudden loud noise tending to startle the predator. The gray tree frog (Hyla versicolor) makes an explosive sound that sometimes repels the shrew Blarina brevicauda. Although toads are avoided by many predators, the common garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis) regularly feeds on them. The strategy employed by juvenile American toads (Bufo americanus) on being approached by a snake is to crouch down and remain immobile. This is usually successful, with the snake passing by and the toad remaining undetected. If it is encountered by the snake's head, however, the toad hops away before crouching defensively.

5 months ago

June, thanks for a fascinating post. Enjoyed the pictures and the explanations. Too bad humanity can't be as generous as the frog was to the rat. Anyone who is different, humanity seems to feel the need to hurt or dislike.

5 months ago

This is amazing, June !!

They stretch themselves to appear bigger !! 

thank you for sharing

5 months ago

Very interesting June and loved the photos, thanks!

4 months ago

Beautiful Frog Looking Blue

4 months ago

A Bug?  Where?!

4 months ago

That Looks Like One Happy Frog

Not seen in over 130 years, 'extinct' frog rediscovered in Sri Lanka ~~ 1/10
3 months ago
3 months ago

Thanks, Kelly, for such an interesting posting.

Hey Fruddy-Buddys..
3 months ago

Thanks Kelly. I'm sure many creatures have been hiding out away from Mankind. On purpose I'm sure. Sorry I haven't been around but still computer problems and a lot of crap going on in my life, all bad so I' trying to stay in touch and do what little I can. Fruddy Hugs to you all from me and old, old Dottie. xoxo

The rediscovered Pseudophilautus hypomelas. Photo by: L.J. Mendis Wickramasinghe.
3 months ago

As Per Kelly R.s post above

The rediscovered Pseudophilautus hypomelas. Photo by: L.J. Mendis Wickramasinghe.

3 months ago

Neat pictures. Thanks for Sharing

Frog dance ..... yay gotta learn those moves
1 month ago

1 month ago

amazing pics thank you all my dear friends

1 month ago

As I go over these pictures and stories again; I am totally amazed. They are awesome, Thanks for sharing June, Tj, Kelly and the rest of you in the group/

Got this news today......
1 month ago

 Dear Iain,

From June 19th to 28th, SAVE THE FROGS! will lead an experience of a lifetime in the beautiful country of Belize:
www.savethefrogs.com/belize2014

I hope you can join me as we trek through old-growth rainforests, explore limestone caverns, swim in the warm Caribbean Sea, and appreciate the amazing amphibians of this wonderful country. Belize is a place that is near and dear to my heart and I welcome the opportunity to share this incredible adventure with you. I have participated, coordinated and led eco-tours to Belize for the last 4 years and I know this time is going to be another special expedition. We will also be accompanied by SAVE THE FROGS! Ecologist Kathlyn Franco as well as Mayan naturalists and field guides. Time is running out so please act fast to get your early bird discount (available through March 15th) and reserve your spot. Please visit www.savethefrogs.com/belize2014 to learn more about this exciting adventure.

 

 

 

Interested? Then feel free to email me directly or visit www.savethefrogs.com/belize2014 for more information. Thanks and I hope to see you in Belize!

 

Sincerely,
Michael G. Starkey

SAVE THE FROGS! - Advisory Committee Chair, Ecologist

www.savethefrogs.com

www.savethefrogs.com/michael-starkey

 

SAVE THE FROGS!

2524 San Pablo Avenue

Berkeley, CA 94702

starkey@savethefrogs.com

 

Save The Frogs is the world's leading amphibian conservation

organization. We work in California, across the USA, and around the

world to prevent the extinction of amphibians, and to create a better

planet for humans and wildlife.

 

The 6th Annual Save The Frogs Day is April 26th, 2014 -- Get involved!

www.savethefrogs.com/day 

Local Park - Froggy's and Spawn
1 month ago

froggies.jpg


Spawn.jpg

1 month ago

happy tuesday friends

http://images2.fanpop.com/images/photos/7000000/Frog-Wallpaper-frogs-7018028-1024-768.jpg

1 month ago
  • March 17,2014: The Rio Frio Salamander, Ambystoma leorae, long ago disappeared from the heavily polluted stream where it was first found. The stream-adapted species, once included in the no longer recognized genus Rhyacosiredon, has been rediscovered (the last report of a surviving population is 1983). A new study reports that the critically endangered species persists in a single population on Volcan Tlaloc, located adjacent to what may be the largest and densely urbanized area on earth. The salamanders, found in two small streams, show low genetic diversity but high average heterozygosity, and three genetic subpopulations were recognized in the restricted geographic range. While it is good news that the species persists, its habitat is very restricted and it remains at high risk of extinction. (DW)
1 month ago

Hyperolius molleri

1 month ago

Thanks, Trinity, for a lot of good information. In the words of Hemingway, "Wouldn't it be pretty to think so?" (the salamanders would continue to be so lucky to escape humanity's attention and extinction)

3 weeks ago

Thanks Fruddy-Buddys for all the great photos. And Junee for all that info., But, "Where have all the Sheddys gone, long time missing". There was a song like that very long ago, but with Flowers. I think our newest member left since nobody came by to welcome him. Neat stuff posted and one petition. Lisa B, misses You !! ha,ha. xo

3 weeks ago

Dae ye no mean whars awe the Fruddy Buddy's  gone Vinnie?  ...Sorry buddy, ye must be at yer wits end wi Auld Dottie  

Guid info Trinity

Great quote that Nancy

Huv a nice Sunday all

3 weeks ago

No, Sweetie, I meant Sheddys.. Nobody has stopped into the  "Watersheds" group that I run with Lisa B., We had a man named Doug, join and I put out the Welcome mat but nobody has been in. One Petition and new stuff in the Oceans Offbeat Thread. Cool stuff !! And YES, I am at my Wits end with Dottie. She has been barking for about 7 hours and I can't think at all. Still trying that Rimadyl,  Sarah G., sent me from our Horse group, and the Chondroitan I bought with help from Kelly R., and Holly. It seems like her arthritis might be improving but it's only been two and half weeks, but her barking continues. I'm about ready to muzzle her. Fruddy Hugs and goodnight. xoxo

3 weeks ago

Vinnie, you and Dottie are in my prayers. Hope she improves. So sad when those we love are in pain. Take care and know all of your friends and their fur babies care about you and Dottie.

2 weeks ago

FANTASTIC THREAD

AS USUAL JUNEE YOU AMAZE ME,AND I LOVE TO BE AMAZED

IF I HAD INFLUENCE WITH THE GOOD FAIRY,I WOULD MAKE EVERY GROWN UP HAVE NEVER LOST THEIR SENSE OF WONDER

AND I WOULD STEAL HER FAIRY DUST,THAT SH*T IS EXPENSIVE!!

2 weeks ago

2 weeks ago

2 weeks ago

Thanks for sharing; enjoyed it. Still think this is the best group ever!

2 weeks ago

surf's up
1 week ago

1 week ago

Very nice photos thank you all 

1 week ago

Holly and Tasunka, you made my day. Thanks for sharing. Until I joined this group, I never realized how beautiful frogs were and of course, how beautiful my fruddy friends were.