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Argentina calls on Cameron to reopen Falklands talks
2 years ago
Argentina calls on Cameron to reopen Falklands talks
Cristina Fernandez
Argentina has been stepping up diplomatic pressure in recent months

Argentine President Cristina Fernandez has urged new UK Prime Minister David Cameron to hold talks over the sovereignty of the Falkland Islands.

 

The two countries went to war in 1982 after Argentina invaded, with UK forces retaking the territory after a short but bloody conflict.

 

Mrs Fernandez made her call at the EU-Latin America summit in Madrid.

 

Foreign Office minister Jeremy Browne said the UK had "no doubt" about its right to sovereignty.

 

"The principle of self determination as set out in the UN charter applies," he said in a statement.

 

"There cannot be negotiation on sovereignty unless and until the Falkland Islanders so wish. The Lisbon Treaty clearly reaffirms the EU position that the Falkland Islands is an Overseas Territory of the United Kingdom."

 

Mr Browne added that the UK and Argentina had a "close and productive relationship" in other areas, including economic issues in the G20, climate change, sustainable development and counter-proliferation.

 

UN request

 

Mr Cameron was represented at the summit by Foreign Secretary William Hague.

Argentina has long laid claim to the islands in the South Atlantic, which are known in Spanish as Las Malvinas.

 

In a speech at the summit opening Mrs Fernandez said: "In the name of my country and greeting [the] new prime minister, I would like to request that we please resume our negotiations on sovereignty over the Malvinas Islands."

Argentina has stepped up a diplomatic offensive to try to pressure London into negotiations.

 

In February, Buenos Aires expressed concern over oil exploration in the islands' waters.

 

In March, then Prime Minister Gordon Brown rejected talks after Argentina brought up the subject at a G20 summit. It had earlier asked United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon to bring the UK into discussions.

 

And only last week, the new UK Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition government rejected a call by Mrs Fernandez to halt the oil exploration being carried out by British companies.

 

One firm, Rockhopper Exploration, has said that initial data collected from a well "indicated an oil discovery" in the North Falkland Basin.

 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/8689991.stm


 

Cameron on sovereignty of Falkland Islands
2 years ago

Cameron on sovereignty of Falkland Islands Prime Minister David Cameron has made his opinions on the sovereignty of the Falkland Islands clear.

 

Speaking in the House of Commons on Wednesday 15th June he said: "As long as the Falkland Islands want to be sovereign British territory, they should remain sovereign British territory - full stop, end of story."

 

The Falklands are at the centre of a territorial dispute dating back to the 19th Century.

 

The Argentinian president, Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, has called Britain "arrogant" for refusing to negotiate on the islands.

 

Video        http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-13811354

Argentine leader says UK 'arrogant' over Falklands
2 years ago

Argentine leader says UK 'arrogant' over Falklands

Cristina Fernandez, President of Argentina: "We are going to get the Falklands back"

The president of Argentina, Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, has called Britain "arrogant" for refusing to negotiate on the Falklands. She was speaking a day after UK Prime Minister David Cameron said the issue of sovereignty was non-negotiable.

 

President Fernandez called his refusal to hold talks on the sovereignty of the Falklands, or Malvinas, arrogant and bordering on stupidity.

 

Britain defeated an Argentine invasion of the islands in 1982.

The Falklands are at the centre of a territorial dispute dating back to the 19th Century.

 

Argentina has repeatedly requested talks on the islands' future sovereignty.

But most Falkland islanders wish to retain British sovereignty and 14 June is marked as Liberation Day in the capital, Port Stanley. Last week Washington called on Britain and Argentina to negotiate over the Falklands' sovereignty.

 

But during Wednesday's Prime Minister's Questions Conservative MP Andrew Rosindell urged Mr Cameron to remind President Barack Obama that "the British government will never accept any kind of negotiations over the South Atlantic archipelago".

 

Mr Cameron responded that "as long as the Falkland Islands want to be sovereign British territory, they should remain sovereign British territory - full stop, end of story."

 

Crude colonial power'

James Peck is handed his identity card by Argentine President Cristina Fernandez

President Fernandez described his comments as an "expression of mediocrity, and almost of stupidity".

 

She said the British "continue to be a crude colonial power in decline".

 

On Friday, a spokeswoman for Downing Street said the prime minister maintained his position. She said the government had made it clear to Argentina that it was prepared to hold talks but would not negotiate on sovereignty. "We're not prepared to discuss the sovereignty of the Falkland Islands against the wishes of the Falkland people."

 

Earlier this week a British man became the first Falkland islander to choose Argentine citizenship. James Peck was handed his national identity card by President Fernandez, during a ceremony to mark the 29th anniversary of the end of the Falklands War.

 

Mr Peck's father Terry, who died in 2006, had been a member of the Falkland Islands Defence Force. Sir Sandy Woodward, the retired admiral who led the British taskforce which set sail for the Falklands in 1982, told a newspaper earlier this week he feared the islands were "now perilously close to being indefensible".

He told the Daily Mail: "Twenty-nine years ago today, we re-claimed the Falklands for Britain in one of the most remarkable campaigns since the Second World War.

"The simple truth is without aircraft carriers and without the Americans, we would not have any hope of doing the same again today."

 

Adm Woodward questioned whether the US would continue to support Britain's sovereignty over the islands, pointing to Washington's call last week for negotiations. The Americans' reference to the islands by their Argentinian name - the Malvinas - didn't "leave too much doubt about which way the wind may be blowing", he said.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-13803111

 

Prince William to be deployed to Falklands
2 years ago

Prince William to be deployed
to Falklands

The Duke of Cambridge
The Duke's tour was first announced in the summer

Related Stories

 

The Duke of Cambridge will be posted to the Falkland Islands for six weeks next February and March, the Ministry of Defence (MoD) has announced. Prince William will complete a routine deployment as a Royal Air Force search and rescue co-pilot.

 

Flt Lt Wales - as he is known - from 22 Squadron, RAF Valley, will be part of a crew of four RAF personnel. The deployment will form the latest stage of his training programme, RAF officials said.

 

His tour of the remote islands in the South Atlantic - a British overseas territory - was announced this summer, but details and timings have only just been finalised.

 

'Career progression'

The dates of his tour have been chosen to avoid a clash with the Queen's 2012 Diamond Jubilee celebrations, which William is expected to attend over an extended four-day bank holiday weekend in June. The MoD said in a statement: "This deployment forms part of a normal squadron crew rotation and will form part of Flt Lt Wales' training and career progression as a search and rescue pilot within the RAF."

 

The 30th anniversary of the Falklands War will also be commemorated next year. William's uncle, the Duke of York, served in the 10-week conflict in 1982 as a Sea King helicopter pilot. William, who will be posted without his wife Catherine, qualified as an RAF Search and Rescue Force (Sarf) helicopter co-pilot last September and is based at RAF Valley, in Anglesey, north Wales.

 

Observers say he has increased his workload recently as he seeks promotion to a higher position allowing him to take full charge of his helicopter. Tensions between Argentina and Britain over the disputed islands remain. Britain has ruled them for more than 180 years, but Argentina claims sovereignty over the islands it calls Las Malvinas.

 

This summer, Argentine president Cristina Kirchner accused David Cameron of "mediocrity bordering on stupidity" when the UK prime minister said the islands should remain a British territory if that was what its inhabitants wanted.

She insisted the two countries should negotiate over the islands.

BBC royal correspondent Nicholas Witchell said Argentine officials have already indicated they consider the deployment "insensitive", given recent history.

But he said the RAF, backed by the government, felt it would be wrong for the Duke not to go simply because of his identity.

 

 

For six weeks an isolated British overseas territory will be Prince William's home.

It is both a routine deployment of an RAF search and rescue pilot and possibly a sensitive one. A future king will be living on land in the Atlantic Ocean which two countries have argued over, and sacrificed lives over, for two centuries.

 

Mindful of the potential for upset in Argentina, the RAF is making clear that William will not conduct any ceremonial duties while he s there. The prince is said to be looking forward to going. He hopes it will help him secure promotion from flight lieutenant to a higher position allowing him to take full charge of his helicopter. While aware of the ongoing disputed history, William is likely to be more pre-occupied with the practicalities.

 

The MoD advises people like him who'll be using single accommodation to bring with them an extra coat hook.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-15682242

 

 

Argentina condemns Prince William Falklands posting
2 years ago

Argentina condemns Prince William Falklands posting


The Duke of Cambridge's posting to the Falkland Islands has been condemned by Argentina as a "provocative act".

 

Britain says Prince William's deployment for training as a helicopter rescue pilot is routine. But Argentine official Sebastian Brugo Marco said Argentina could not ignore the "political content" of the mission.

 

The prince's tour next year will come shortly before the 30th anniversary of Argentina's defeat in the Falklands War. Argentina still claims sovereignty over the islands, which it calls Las Malvinas. Mr Brugo Marco, the Argentine official with responsibility for the South Atlantic territory, made his comments in an interview with the Argentine newspaper, La Nacion.

 

"It is one more provocative act that shows Britain's military presence in a zone of peace where there is no armed conflict," he said.

"One cannot ignore the political content of this military operation bearing in mind that the prince forms part of the Royal Family".

 

'Arrogant' Britain

 

The Royal Air force has stressed that the posting is a normal part of Prince William's training and says he will not perform any ceremonial duties.

His uncle, the Duke of York, served as a helicopter pilot in the 1982 conflict, when Argentina invaded the islands only to be defeated by a British task force.

 

Earlier this year Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner called Britain "arrogant" for refusing to negotiate on the islands.

 

Her government stepped up its campaign to gain sovereignty over the territory in 2010 after Britain started to search for oil in Falklands waters.

 

UK Prime Minister David Cameron has said there can be no negotiations on the status of the islands unless the people of the Falklands want them.

 

Britain has ruled the Falklands for more than 180 years, but Argentina insists it has a prior claim.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-15703340

 

 

2 years ago

Falklands sovereignty is "non-negotiable", says PM

Stanley in the Falkland Islands
Argentina has long claimed sovereignty over the Falkland Islands, which lie 400 miles from its coast

Prime Minister David Cameron has said Britain would "never negotiate" the sovereignty of the Falklands against the wishes of the islanders.

 

In his Christmas message to the islands, he said he "could never accept" an Argentine challenge to their right to self-determination.

 

He criticised "unjustified" efforts by Buenos Aires to disrupt shipping links.

A South American trading bloc has banned ships flying the Falklands flag from docking at their ports.

 

Mr Cameron says the British government's commitment to the security and prosperity of overseas territories, including the Falklands, "remains undiminished".

 

"So let me be absolutely clear. We will always maintain our commitment to you on any question of sovereignty. Your right to self-determination is the cornerstone of our policy," he said.

 

"We will never negotiate on the sovereignty of the Falkland Islands unless you, the Falkland Islanders, so wish. No democracy could ever do otherwise."

 

Earlier this week, the Mercosur bloc - which includes Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay - agreed to close its ports to ships flying the Falkland Islands flag.

 

The decision is the latest in a series by Latin American regional bodies designed to show solidarity with Argentina that has long claimed sovereignty over the Falkland Islands, which it calls the Malvinas.

 

Long dispute

Britain has held them since the 1830s and says their future is not negotiable. The two countries fought a brief but bloody war over the islands in 1982.

 

Their dispute has flared again recently. Last year, Argentina accused the UK of breaking international rules by allowing oil drilling under a sea-bed off the islands, located in a vast area of potentially mineral-rich South Atlantic waters.

 

In November, Argentina also condemned the announcement of Prince William's RAF posting to the Falkland Islands next year, calling it a "provocative act".

Mr Cameron said he wanted a "constructive relationship" with Argentina and there was common ground between the two countries on a range of issues from the global economy to climate change.

 

"We want to work with Argentina on those issues. But the Argentine government has continued to make statements which challenge your right to self-determination, and we can never accept that," he wrote.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-16320959

 

 

FAlkland plus the UK plus Argentina
2 years ago

Uh oh. Are we going to be seeing more hostilities after so many years of peace down in the Falklands?

Maybe we should go down and keep the Brits Company, while at the same time, keep a watch on Venezuela and its proposed Nuclear Silos which are said to be in the makings for whatever the Dictator Ahmedinejad has in mind?
Is anyone aware of any new happenings in that area. I'm not exactly sure how close Venezuela is to the Falklands, but I'm of the opinion that the location where the NUCLEAR SILOS were supposed to be created is somewhere along the Eastern Coast of South America, so what would be better than to have a place nearby to watch its progress?
Jim Petersen

2 years ago

James, welcome to Political Derby, I so sorry for not welcoming yourself before now, but I have had a number of matters that I must see to leading upto Christmas, and may I wish you and your family Merry Christmas and hope you and your family have Jolly Happy New Year also.


In relation to the Falklands, You maybe correct inrelation to further combat between UK and Argentina, the Prime Minister clearly stated; We will never negotiate on the sovereignty of the Falkland Islands unless, the Falkland Islanders so wish.


The PM, knows how important the Falklands is to the UK, as you are aware UK is a small Country so the little Islands like the Falklands are a must TO Britain, and Britain will protect its interests not only to the people on the Falklands but also the Falklands itself.


I recall the War very much so like it was yesterday, I will give you the link to what was the task force I have given you a link to the Task Force and what formed the Task Force

 

 

Battle Atlas of the Falklands War 1982

BRITISH AND ARGENTINE UNITS TAKING PART (Parts 7-16)

Part 8. BRITISH TASK FORCE BUILD-UP


http://www.naval-history.net/F18taskforce.htm

 

When you click on to the link you will see on the right hand side of the page to 9. Royal Navy warships this will take to the ships that was use in War, you will also see the same for al th forces that Britain used against Argentina, our PM at the time of this War was not a person to mess about with.

 

The Falklanders, I would think would be more than pleased to accept Americans, but not so sure about anyone from Argentina.

 

2 years ago

James and Ray, that sounds like a winning combination.  We come down and help the UK and they can help us watch Venezuela at the same time.  

 

Glad to see you two posting today and Merry Christmas.

Falklands / Ray - Jim
2 years ago

Just getting a few responses out and then OFF TO THE CASINO WE GO. Haven't been to one in a long time.

Got to Church last night and feel like I'm blessed, so I'm going to go try my luck - Lol Lol.

Hope you day is wonderful as well.

Jim Petersen

2 years ago

 

Ray, this is just another example of Obama's bizarre foreign policy.

 

The UK has maintained the right of the Islanders to self-determination ~ and the Islanders have overwhelmingly expressed their desire to remain British and have consistently lobbied the UK to maintain the status quo.


Argentina rejects the rights of the Islanders to have self-determination and ignores the constitution of the Falklands which was written in response to on-going threats from Argentina to allow the Islanders to make the choice themselves.

 

International law also supports the rights of the Islanders as regards self-determination. The UN Charter states that as one of its primary purposes is "To develop friendly relations among nations based on respect for the principle of equal rights and self-determination of peoples...”

 

The International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) both state "All peoples have the right of self-determination. By virtue of that right they freely determine their political status and freely pursue their economic, social and cultural development."

 

Wikipedia has a table showing past sovereignty over the Falkland Islands that helps put this matter in better perspective regarding the territorial claims of Argentina: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Falklands.permanence.png

 

All previous attempts to settle the dispute by the UN and other countries (Peru, Switzerland, etc) have been rejected by Argentina ~ not the UK.

 

James, unfortunately, we have no Reagan in office now ~ who always respected the special relationship between the US and the UK.

 

Apparently, Obama supports the Cosmopolitan Liberalism view that endorses a shift to a world government which would make matters of this sort simply an administrative decision by politicians who are not bound by any necessity to consider the rights of self-determination by any nation.

2 years ago

Excellent response, Val, as usual.  Barack Obama is all over a One World Government mentality and in lockstep with progressives in our country.   You know these folks in our country....when Obama went around the world on his "We Suck Tour" to apologize for America....there it was...for all Americans to witness....a New World Order governed by a single group of men.  

 

 

Argentina outraged at Cameron's 'colonialism' remarks
2 years ago

Argentina outraged at Cameron's 'colonialism' remarks
Port Stanley, Falkland Islands capital
This April marks the 30th anniversary of the start of the Falklands War

Related Stories

Argentine leaders have reacted with fury after UK Prime Minister David Cameron accused Argentina of "colonialism" for continuing to claim sovereignty over the Falkland Islands.

 

"It's totally offensive, especially coming from Great Britain," Interior Minister Florencio Randazzo said.

 

The Argentine government has demanded renewed talks about the islands, which Argentina calls Las Malvinas.

 

Mr Cameron said they would stay British for as long as the islanders wanted.

 

Argentina's demands for that to change were "like colonialism", Mr Cameron told parliament on Wednesday.

 

In response, Argentine Foreign Minister Hector Timerman said Great Britain was a country "synonymous with colonialism".

 

"Obviously at a time when there are only remnants of colonialism, Great Britain in imperial decline, decides to rewrite history," he was quoted as saying by the official Telam news agency.

 

The sharp exchange of words comes ahead of the 30th anniversary of the Falklands War, which was prompted by an Argentine invasion of the islands.

 

Most Falkland Islanders wish to retain British sovereignty and 14 June is marked as Liberation Day in the capital, Port Stanley.

 

Speaking on Wednesday, Mr Cameron said the "absolutely vital point" was that "the future of the Falkland Islands is a matter for the people themselves".

David Cameron told Andrew Rosindell MP: ''The future of the Falkland Islands is a matter for the people''

 

"As long as they want to remain part of the United Kingdom and be British, they should be able to do so," he said.

 

"What the Argentinians have been saying recently, I would argue, is actually far more like colonialism because these people want to remain British and the Argentinians want them to do something else."

 

Mr Cameron said he wanted to "make sure our defences and everything else are in order", which is why a National Security Council meeting had been held on Tuesday to discuss the issue.

 

Offshore resources

President Fernandez has repeatedly requested talks on the islands' future and accused the UK of "arrogance" for refusing to negotiate.

 

She has accused Britain of "taking Argentine resources" from the islands and the waters around them.

 

Tensions have risen in recent years over oil exploration around the Falklands.

 

In December, the Mercosur grouping of countries, which includes Argentina, Uruguay, Brazil and Paraguay, announced that it would ban ships sailing under the Falkland Islands flag from docking at their ports.

 

The islands were discussed on Wednesday during a visit by UK Foreign Minister William Hague to Brazil.

 

Mr Hague knows that "Brazil and other South American nations support Argentine sovereignty over the Malvinas and that we support the UN resolutions calling on Argentina and Britain to discuss the issue," Brazilian Foreign Minister Antonio Patriota told reporters.

 

Mr Hague said differences over the Falklands did not stop the UK having a "vastly productive relationship and growing friendship" with Brazil.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-16625963

2 years ago

Looks like Argentina is after another war over the Falklands, I do not know what they keep on about the Falklands for, Cameron has made it very clear on a number of times that the Falklands  sovereignty is "non-negotiable end of story.

 

So why Argentina keeps on about something that they can't do anything about is beyond me, never mind gear up the task force again to support British Troops on the Falklands. that if the task force is really needed with having the SAS already on the Falklands.

William Hague pushes for stronger Latin America ties
2 years ago

William Hague pushes for stronger Latin America ties
William Hague at a joint news conference with Rio de Janeiro's governor Sergio CabralBritain aims to forge strong diplomatic and trade ties with Latin American nations, said Mr Hague
Continue reading the main story Related Stories

The UK is launching its strongest diplomatic offensive in Latin America for two centuries, the foreign secretary has said as he visits Brazil.

 

William Hague is the first UK foreign secretary to visit for six years.

 

He said the UK welcomed Brazil's "growing impact on the economic and political landscape of the world".

 

It comes amid a diplomatic row between Argentina and Britain, after the UK PM accused it of "colonialism" over its stance on the Falkland Islands.

 

Meanwhile, it has been announced Prince Harry will visit Brazil ahead of the London Olympics and the Diamond Jubilee, to promote ties between the two countries.

 

Growing impact

Britain is aiming to forge strong diplomatic and trade ties with Brazil and other Latin American nations, Mr Hague said on Thursday.

 

He said the opening of a British consulate in the north-eastern Brazilian city of Recife, and the reopening of an embassy in the Central American nation of El Salvador represented the UK's strongest diplomatic offensive in Latin America in two centuries.

 

"The days of our diplomatic retreat from your region are over," Mr Hague told reporters at a joint news conference with Rio de Janeiro's governor, Sergio Cabral.

 

He said the new push reflected the changing world order, with developing powers like Brazil taking on ever-greater importance.

 

"We recognise your country's growing impact on the economic and political landscape of the world," Mr Hague said.

 

"This is change that Britain does not fear, but that we welcome and embrace."

 

Meanwhile, David Cameron sparked a furious response after he accused Argentina of "colonialism" for continuing to claim sovereignty over the Falkland Islands.

 

He told Parliament the islands would stay British for as long as the islanders wanted.

 

War anniversary

In response, Argentine Foreign Minister Hector Timerman said Great Britain was a country "synonymous with colonialism".

 

The sharp exchange of words came ahead of the 30th anniversary of the Falklands War, which was prompted by an Argentine invasion of the islands, which it refers to as Las Malvinas.

 

The BBC's Paulo Cabral, in Brazil, said Mr Hague's visit had highlighted divergence on important global issues between the British and Brazilian government, including claims over the Falkland Islands.

 

Mr Hague criticised Brazil's decision to abide by Argentina's demand of not allowing boats flying the Falkland Islands flag to dock at ports in the Mercosur trade bloc.

 

"Clearly we don't agree with that decision by Mercosur, we don't agree with anything that is designed to put pressure on a community which has it's own right to self-determination," he said.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-16643670

Argentines stage Falklands protest outside UK embassy
2 years ago

Argentines stage Falklands protest outside UK embassy
Argentine left-wing activists burn a Union flag outside the British embassy in Buenos Aires
The activists say they will escalate their protests

Left-wing activists have protested outside the British embassy in Buenos Aires to demand Argentina break off diplomatic relations with the UK over the Falkland Islands dispute.

Around 100 protesters gathered to burn Union flags in front of the embassy.

Tension has been increasing ahead of the 30th anniversary of the Falklands War in April.

 

Argentina is demanding talks on its claim to sovereignty over the territory, which it calls Las Malvinas.

 

But the UK has reaffirmed that the Falklands will remain British for as long as its inhabitants want.

 

'English out'

The protest in Buenos Aires was organised by the Socialist Workers' Movement (MST).

 

Activists carried banners reading "Government break off relations now," and "English out of the Malvinas".

 

"It is unacceptable that they send reinforcements and that the little prince (William) should come on manoeuvres," said protest leader Wilma Ripoll of the MST.

 

Ms Ripoll added that her group was planning further protests before Prince William - who is the second in line to the British throne - arrives in the Falklands next month for a tour of duty as a helicopter rescue pilot.

 

The protest comes amid an escalating war of words between London and Buenos Aires over the Falklands.

 

Argentine leaders were particularly angered by comments made by the British Prime Minister David Cameron on Wednesday, when he said Argentina's demand for sovereignty was "like colonialism" because it ignored the islanders' right to self-determination.

 

He also said he had reviewed the Falklands' military defences and was prepared to send reinforcements if necessary.

US position

Tension over the remote South Atlantic archipelago has been growing since 2010, when British companies began drilling for oil in waters off the Falklands.

 

Argentina has been rallying support for its claim from other Latin American nations, and President Cristina Fernandez has accused Britain of "arrogance" and "taking Argentine resources".

 

Britain has held the islands since the 1830s, but Argentina insists it has a prior claim and in 1982 launched an invasion.

 

A British task force recaptured the islands in a short but bloody war in which 649 Argentine and 255 British servicemen were killed.

 

The US has called for dialogue between London and Buenos Aires to resolve the dispute.

 

"We recognise de facto UK administration of the islands, but take no position regarding sovereignty," the State Department said.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-16663290

2 years ago

Argentina's Kirchner attacks UK 'nonsense' on Falklands
Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner makes her first appearance after undergoing surgery for cancer 25 January 2012
Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner has resumed her duties after surgery for cancer of the thyroid

Related Stories

Argentina's president has condemned the UK prime minister's claim last week that her government takes a colonialist attitude to the Falklands Islands.

 

Making her first public appearance after undergoing surgery for cancer, Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner branded David Cameron's comment "nonsense".

 

A surgery scar was visible on her throat as she spoke at government headquarters in Buenos Aires.

 

This April marks 30 years since the start of the Falklands War.

 

"They are trying to paint us as bad guys, or violent guys and really, that is not who we are," Mrs Kirchner told a packed auditorium after 20 days of medical leave for thyroid surgery.

 

Mr Cameron outraged many in Argentina last week when he accused the country of having a "colonialist" attitude over the disputed islands.

 

Protesters marched on the British embassy in Buenos Aires on Friday, burning the Union flag, and demanding that diplomatic ties with London be severed.

 

Referring to Mr Cameron's comments, Mrs Kirchner said that people only talk nonsense when they do not have solid arguments.

 

Mrs Kirchner's comments came mid-way through her remarks to supporters at the Argentinian Presidential Palace.

 

Her remarks illustrate how potent the issue of the Falklands Islands remains across Argentinian society.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-16735731
2 years ago

26 January 2012 Last updated at 19:33

 

Argentina's senate discusses Falkland Islands' future

Argentina's president responds to Cameron's comments about Argentina

Continue reading the main story Related Stories

Argentina's upper house, the Senate, is set to discuss the future of the Falkland Islands when it meets later.

 

Argentina's president earlier condemned UK prime minister David Cameron's claim her government took a "colonialist" attitude to the territory.

 

Argentina has demanded talks on its claim to sovereignty over the islands, which it calls Las Malvinas.

 

But the UK has reaffirmed that the Falklands will remain British for as long as its inhabitants want.

 

Tension has been increasing ahead of the 30th anniversary in April of the two countries' war over the territory.

 

Making her first public appearance after undergoing surgery, Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner criticised David Cameron's remarks.

 

Her comments came mid-way through a speech to supporters at the Argentine Presidential Palace in Buenos Aires on Wednesday evening

 

Referring to Mr Cameron's remarks to MPs during prime minister's questions in the House of Commons on 18 January, Mrs Fernandez said that people only talk in such a way when they do not have solid arguments.

 

"I heard that they were calling us, the Argentines, colonialists," Mrs Fernandez told a packed auditorium after 20 days of medical leave for thyroid surgery.

 

"One always is tempted to respond and such, but... it is necessary to avoid it because one says such things when one has no reasons nor arguments."

She added: "They are trying to paint us as bad guys, or violent guys and really, that is not who we are."

 

Mr Cameron outraged many in Argentina with his accusation and last Friday protesters marched on the British embassy in Buenos Aires, burning the Union flag, and demanding that diplomatic ties with London be severed.

 

BBC correspondent Fergal Keane in Buenos Aires says there is no mood in Argentina for military adventurism and the government will instead continue its policy of trying to isolate Britain diplomatically.

 

The strategy is to invoke regional solidarity with support from countries like Brazil.

 

Argentina will portray itself as a Latin American nation whose resources of oil and fishing around the islands are being pillaged by outsiders, our correspondent says.

 

The issue of the Falkland Islands' sovereignty was also raised in Britain's House of Commons on Thursday, with Chairman of the Defence Select Committee James Arbuthnot saying the UK would not let them go.

 

"If the Falkland Islands were by any chance to be retaken by Argentina, we would take it back," he said.

 

"Argentina should be in no doubt of that at all."

2 years ago

Argentina Senate condemns Cameron's Falklands statement

Port Stanley, Falkland Islands capital
This April marks the 30th anniversary of the start of the Falklands War

Argentina's Senate has condemned a statement by the UK prime minister in which he criticised Argentina's attitude towards the Falkland islands.

 

David Cameron told MPs Argentina had a "colonialist" attitude to the islands.

Senators said they wanted a "peaceful" end to the dispute over the islands, which Argentina calls the Malvinas.

 

Argentina has demanded talks over the South Atlantic territory's sovereignty but the UK says it will remain British for as long as its inhabitants want.

Tension has been increasing ahead of the 30th anniversary in April of the two countries' war over the territory.

 

Buenos Aires has accused Britain of breaking a United Nations resolution forbidding unilateral development in disputed waters, by beginning oil drilling under a seabed off the Falkland Islands.

 

In a statement, the Senate's Foreign Relations Committee said they condemned "any acts of exploration or exploitation of natural resources in the illegally occupied territories by foreign powers, such is the case of the Falklands".

 

The senators said "the Argentine Parliament and all related political forces demand that the United Kingdom starts accepting the UN resolution over the Malvinas matter". The legislators insisted their claim over the islands will be sought via diplomatic channels only.

 

The issue of the Falkland Islands' sovereignty was also raised in the House of Commons on Thursday, with Chairman of the Defence Select Committee James Arbuthnot saying the UK would not let them go.

 

"If the Falkland Islands were by any chance to be retaken by Argentina, we would take it back," he said.

 

"Argentina should be in no doubt of that at all."

 

Fernandez criticism

 

On Wednesday, making her first public appearance after undergoing surgery, Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner criticised David Cameron's earlier remarks which had come during prime minister's questions in the House of Commons on 18 January.

Argentina's president responds to Cameron's comments about Argentina

 

Her comments came mid-way through a speech to supporters at the Argentine Presidential Palace in Buenos Aires. Mrs Fernandez said that people only spoke in such a way when they did not have solid arguments. "I heard that they were calling us, the Argentines, colonialists," Mrs Fernandez told a packed auditorium after 20 days of medical leave for thyroid surgery.

 

"One always is tempted to respond and such, but... it is necessary to avoid it because one says such things when one has no reasons nor arguments."

 

She added: "They are trying to paint us as bad guys, or violent guys and really, that is not who we are."

 

Mr Cameron also outraged many in Argentina with his accusation and last Friday protesters marched on the British embassy in Buenos Aires, burning the Union flag, and demanding that diplomatic ties with London be severed.

 

BBC correspondent Fergal Keane in Buenos Aires says there is no mood in Argentina for military adventurism and the government will instead continue its policy of trying to isolate Britain diplomatically.

 

The strategy is to invoke regional solidarity with support from countries like Brazil.

 

Argentina will portray itself as a Latin American nation whose resources of oil and fishing around the islands are being pillaged by outsiders, our correspondent says.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-16735731

 

 

2 years ago

HMS Dauntless destroyer deployed to Falklands by navy

HMS Dauntless
The £1bn ship is among the largest and most powerful air defence destroyers built for the navy

Related Stories

HMS Dauntless is to be deployed off the coast of the Falklands Islands in the South Atlantic, the Royal Navy has confirmed.

 

The Portsmouth-based ship will be the first of the navy's new Type 45 air defence destroyers to go to the area.

 

The Ministry of Defence said it was a routine deployment and HMS Dauntless would replace a frigate currently stationed there.

 

A MoD spokesman said he would not say when the ship was due to set sail.

 

He added that the deployment had nothing to do with increased tensions between the UK and Argentina about who owns the Falklands Islands.

 

BBC defence correspondent Jonathan Beale said it was standard for the UK to have a permanent military presence in the region, which usually included a frigate, a patrol boat and occasionally a submarine, as well as troops and fighter aircraft.

 

Our correspondent said he did not believe the decision to send HMS Dauntless was a case of the government trying to flex its military muscle.

 

However, he did say it would "undoubtedly increase tensions".

 

The move comes ahead of Prince William's deployment to the region as an RAF search and rescue pilot, and the 30-year anniversary of the start of the Falklands conflict.

 

Dauntless is the second of six new design destroyers being built for the Royal Navy, all of which will be based in Portsmouth.

 

Type 45 destroyers have nearly twice the range - about 7,000 miles - and are 45% more fuel efficient than the Type 42 destroyers they are replacing in the £6bn project.

 

A Royal Navy spokesman said: "The Royal Navy has had a continuous presence in the South Atlantic for many years.

 

"The deployment of HMS Dauntless to the South Atlantic has been long planned, is entirely routine and replaces another ship on patrol."

 

Meanwhile, the government has ruled out bringing in a law to ensure the Falkland Islands' right to remain British.

 

Foreign Office Minister Jeremy Browne said existing UN rules already offered protection against ongoing territorial claims made by Argentina.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-16810417

2 years ago

Prince William ready for Falklands duty with RAF

The Duke of Cambridge
The Duke of Cambridge's deployment to the Falkland Islands has been criticised by Argentina

Related Stories

The Duke of Cambridge arrives in the Falklands ahead of a tour of duty as an RAF search and rescue pilot.

 

Prince William, whose younger brother Prince Harry served in Afghanistan in 2008, will have a six-week posting.

 

It comes amid tensions between the UK and Argentina, where the disputed territory is known as the Malvinas.

 

The Royal Navy will send one of its latest warships, the Type 45 destroyer HMS Dauntless, to the region on her maiden mission in the months ahead.

 

Heightened tensions

 

Dauntless is expected to replace the frigate HMS Montrose in the area.

 

The Royal Navy has said the Portsmouth-based destroyer's deployment has been planned for a long time, and is not a reaction to heightened tensions over the Falklands.

 

The Ministry of Defence has said Prince William's posting - as part of an RAF crew of four - is a "routine deployment" for a Sea King pilot as part of "normal" squadron rotation.

 

Buenos Aires has described it as a "provocative act" and said the duke would be wearing "the uniform of a conqueror" when he deploys.

 

Argentina's foreign ministry said it "rejected the British attempt to militarise conflict".

 

'Political' denial

 

UK Prime Minister David Cameron and Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner have accused each other's countries of "colonial" behaviour concerning sovereignty of the South Atlantic islands.

 

Gen Sir David Richards, the Chief of the Defence Staff, has dismissed Argentine claims of a "political" aspect to the duke's deployment.

 

"I can absolutely tell you it wasn't and isn't designed to be," he said.

 

Britain has held the islands since the 1830s, but Argentina insists it has a prior claim.

 

Meanwhile, the Duchess of Cambridge at home in the UK will have the company of a new family member - a cocker spaniel puppy - while her husband is in the Falklands.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-16859361

2 years ago

Prince William starts Falklands duty with RAF

Prince William looking at map with colleague
The deployment to the Falklands is routine for search and rescue pilots at this stage of their career

Related Stories

Prince William has started work as an RAF search and rescue pilot in the Falkland Islands.

The Duke of Cambridge will be part of a four-man crew in the territory providing cover for both the civilian and military population.

 

The six-week deployment will see Flight Lieutenant Wales operate as a Sea King co-pilot, a post he has held at RAF Valley in Anglesey since qualifying.

 

His arrival comes amid renewed tensions between the UK and Argentina.

 

A six-week deployment to the Falklands is routine for search and rescue pilots at this stage of their career, the Ministry of Defence (MoD) said.

'Challenging and varied'

 

Pictures released by the MoD show the prince being briefed about the unique and challenging flying environment of the islands.

 

Squadron Leader Miles Bartlett, search and rescue commanding officer, said a posting to operations in the Falklands was "a vital part" of career progression for a search and rescue pilot.

Prince William inside helicopter4
The prince is likely to contend with a variety of challenging conditions

"The experience they get here is second-to-none," he said.

 

"It is a challenging and varied job providing an essential capability to the military and the Falkland Islands population."

 

The prince is likely to contend with a variety of challenging conditions, as the weather on the islands is often changeable and a significant number of the population live in very remote and rugged areas.

 

Previous tasks have included rescuing fishermen from trawlers, taking seriously ill patients to hospital, putting out peat fires and dropping off supplies to isolated areas.

 

The deployment comes as the Royal Navy sends one of its latest warships, the Type 45 destroyer HMS Dauntless, to the region on her maiden voyage.

 

The Royal Navy has said the Portsmouth-based destroyer's deployment has been planned for a long time, and is not a reaction to heightened tensions over the Falklands.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-16890428

2 years ago

I really respect William and the Queen.  It certainly makes a difference to have the leaders of the Country spend time in the military; it would make a lot of sense if it was a prerequisite for our President, too.

2 years ago

Argentina to raise Falklands UK 'militarisation' at UN

Cristina Fernandez: "This is a regional and global cause because they are militarising the South Atlantic once more"

 

Argentina is to make a formal complaint to the United Nations about British "militarisation" around the disputed Falkland Islands.

President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner made the announcement at a meeting of MPs, senior officials, and veterans of the 1982 war Argentina fought with Britain over the islands.

 

Tensions between the two countries have been increasing in recent weeks.

Last month, the UK said it was sending a destroyer to the region.

 

The status of the islands, known in Argentina as the Malvinas, is still a highly sensitive issue for Buenos Aires.

 

In December, Mercosur, a South American trading bloc, closed its ports to ships flying the Falkland Islands flag.

 

Then, last month, the UK said it was sending one of its newest destroyers, HMS Dauntless, to the South Atlantic, off the Falklands.

London described the move as "routine".

 

Prince William, grandson of Britain's Queen Elizabeth II and second in line to the throne, was also deployed to the islands in his role as a search and rescue helicopter pilot.

 

In her address on Tuesday, Ms Fernandez accused the UK of "militarising the South Atlantic one more time".

 

"We will present a complaint to the UN Security Council and the UN General Assembly, as this militarisation poses a grave danger to international security," Ms Fernandez said.

 

"We cannot interpret in any other way the deployment of an ultra-modern destroyer accompanying the heir to the throne, who we would prefer to see in civilian attire."

 

She asked UK Prime Minister David Cameron "to give peace a chance".

The UK Foreign Office later issued a statement that said: "The people of the Falkland Islands are British out of choice. They are free to determine their own future and there will be no negotiations with Argentina over sovereignty unless the islanders wish it."

 

The BBC's Fergal Keane says President Fernandez's initiative is consistent with recent Argentine attempts to internationalise the Falklands issue.

 

Her government has gained the political support of nations such as Brazil and Uruguay that have banned ships flying the Falklands flag from visiting their ports.

 

Chile's foreign minister also recently declared his support for Argentine sovereignty over the islands.

 

A crowd waving Argentine flags and shouting "Malvinas" rallied near the government palace where Ms Fernandez was speaking.

 

Britain has held the Falkland Islands since 1833.

 

Analysis

In taking a complaint to the UN the Argentine side knows that Britain, as a permanent member of the Security Council, can ultimately veto any critical resolution.

 

Before the speech there had been speculation that Ms Fernandez might signal an end to the important air link between Chile and the Falklands which must use Argentine air space - a move that would have created significant practical difficulties for the islanders.

 

That she chose not to, illustrates that Argentine tactics are not about achieving any kind of immediate practical effect, but are focused instead on a longer-term campaign of diplomatic attrition.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-16939043

2 years ago

It sounds like Argentina may need its tail handed to it by Britain, again.

2 years ago

Does it not make sense that if the people wish to remain under UK rule that this is what it should be? I would call Argentina out on this one; if they are crazy enough to take on the UK then they deserve what happens to them.

2 years ago

The resident of the Falkland Islands are primarily British so why they want to be part of a country like Argentina that has a host of problems? Argentina seems to get the Falkland fetish whenever it is having serious problems and needs to divert the population to an "external threat".

2 years ago

Hi John, may I say it nice to speak to yourself for the first time and I am pleased that you have taken interest in this thread, it a very interesting thread due to the fact we don't know how this matter between Britain and Argentina is going to end, but I will say that  Britain is not in any threatening Argentina as some of the reports state,

 

it is normal for a members of the Royals too go to the Falkland for training, the Royals and expected to spend time in the forces if one day that Royal maybe become King.

 

In relation to Argentina all they are is banging their head up against a brick wall, the sovereignty is left up to the Falklanders themselves, who do they want to control their island, however, should Argentina invate the Falklands again they will be removed, and no doubt the sort of PM Cameron is he would attack Argentina main land to put the matter of the Falklands to bed.

 

Cameron is very much like Thatcher in a way he will not be mess around with Argentina, but you are correct in 1982 if I recall Argentina was having problems in their Country then.

 

I do think that Argentina are making fools of themselves to think about complaining to the UN when Britain is one of the main members, makes me think how on earth did Cristina Fernandez become President, mind you I could say that about Obama but thats another matter.

 

What Argentina must understand the Falkland is British and so are the Falklanders who live there, and British have right to send any of British Military to Falklands at times too suit the British Government, so I would say that Cristina Fernandez is making something out of nothing.

 

2 years ago

Ray, excellent point. I had heard a report around the time of the Royal Wedding that Prince William and Princess Kate would be going to the Falklands some time after their marriage and that is where they send the helicopter pilots for more intense training in rescue.  So, like the rest of the World, this should not have been a surprise for Argentina at all.

 

Cristina Fernandez is doing just what you are saying, Ray, and using this as an excuse to push for Great Britain to return the Falklands to them

2 years ago

My advice to Argentina:

 

1.  Picking problems with Britain that you can't finish as a distraction from internal problems gets old.  Fix your own problems and get over it.


2.  The people are happy and their government is happy.  It is none of your business.


3.  British Royals visiting a British territory should not come as a surprise to you.  Even if it does, again, it is none of your business.


4.  You are a sand flea in world politics.  Get over it and quit bothering the rest of us.

2 years ago

David, that is the spirit and how would you like to run for President.  I think we might still have time to get you on some primary ballots and get a massive campaign going.  You think I am joking?

2 years ago

Falklands: UN chief calls on UK and Argentina for calm

UK Royal Navy destroyer HMS Dauntless, photographed in 2009, which is being sent to the South Atlantic
The UK says the HMS Dauntless is being sent to the South Atlantic as part of routine operations

UN chief Ban Ki-moon has called on Argentina and the UK to avoid an "escalation" in tensions over the disputed Falkland Islands.

His appeal came as Argentina's foreign minister made an official complaint to the UN about the UK's "militarisation" in the South Atlantic.

 

Last month the UK said it was sending one of its newest Royal Navy destroyers to the region.

 

The two countries went to war in 1982 over the British overseas territory.

 

'Colonial holdover'

 

Mr Ban's office said in a statement that the UN secretary general had "expressed the hope that the governments of Argentina and the United Kingdom will avoid an escalation of this dispute and resolve differences peacefully and through dialogue".

 

The UK says it is only carrying out routine operations in the South Atlantic, off Argentina's east coast.

 

The HMS Dauntless, which is due to arrive off the Falklands in March, is among the largest and most powerful of the UK's air defence destroyers.

 

Argentine Foreign Minister Hector Timerman (L) meets UN chief Ban Ki-moon on Friday 10 February 2012
It is not clear if Argentina plans to pursue any further action at the UN beyond Friday's protest

The UK says the islands have been militarised ever since Argentina's invasion in 1982 and insists its defences remain unchanged and the warship is only replacing one in the area.

 

The status of the islands, known in Argentina as the Malvinas, is still a highly sensitive issue for Buenos Aires.

 

In December, Mercosur, a South American trading bloc, closed its ports to ships flying the  Falkland Islands flag.

 

The escalating rhetoric reflects escalating tensions over the 30th anniversary in April of the Falklands war, the BBC's Barbara Plett at the UN in New York reports.

 

It is not clear if Argentina plans to pursue any further action at the UN beyond Friday's protest.

 

Our reporter says there is a fair bit of sympathy at the UN headquarters for Argentina's position that the Falklands are a British colonial holdover.

 

The UN General Assembly has already passed non-binding resolutions urging the two to solve the dispute through negotiations.

 

The UK says the islanders have the right to self-determination and it will enter into negotiations on the status of the Falklands only if they request it.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-16988614

2 years ago

Ray, again I support the UK and thank you for keeping us up to date on this.  I don't think Argentina has a leg to stand on in this and hope that the UK and Falklanders remain strong in their resolve.

2 years ago

 

UK sent nuclear sub near Falklands, says Argentina
UK Royal Navy destroyer HMS Dauntless, photographed in 2009, which is being sent to the South Atlantic
The UK says HMS Dauntless is being sent to the South Atlantic as part of routine operations
Argentina's foreign minister has accused the UK of sending a nuclear-armed submarine to the South Atlantic, after making an official complaint to the UN over the Falklands dispute.

Hector Timerman demanded that the British confirm the location of nuclear submarines in the region. But UK officials said the accusations of militarisation were "absurd". UN chief Ban Ki-moon earlier called on both sides to avoid an "escalation" in tensions over the Falkland Islands.

 

The two countries went to war in 1982 over the British overseas territory.

 

Mr Timerman told a news conference at the UN in New York that the UK was "militarising the region", repeating accusations made by Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner earlier this week.

 

"Argentina has information that, within the framework of the recent British deployment in the Falklands, they sent a nuclear submarine with the capacity to transport nuclear weapons to the South Atlantic," Mr Timerman said.

 

 

He did not elaborate on the information, but said the vessel was Vanguard-class, a group that carries Trident nuclear missiles.

 

 

He added that Mr Ban had agreed to talk to the British about Argentina's complaints.

 

The Latin America and the Caribbean region is designated a nuclear-free zone under a treaty signed in the 1960s. In response, Britain's UN envoy Mark Lyall Grant said the government does not comment on the "disposition of nuclear weapons, submarines etc".

 

And he dismissed the accusation that the UK was militarising the situation as "manifestly absurd". "Before 1982 there was a minimal defence presence in the Falkland Islands," he said.

 

 

"It is only because Argentina illegally invaded the Falkland Islands in 1982 that we had to increase our defence posture.

 

Nothing has changed in that defence posture in recent months or recent years."

 

The UK had earlier said it was carrying out routine operations in the South Atlantic, which includes the deployment of one of its most advanced destroyers, HMS Dauntless.

 

Prince William, the grandson of Queen Elizabeth II and second in line to the throne, has also been sent to the islands for a tour of duty in his job as a helicopter rescue pilot.

 

 

Sensitive issue

 

The BBC's Barbara Plett at the UN in New York says the dispute is raised every year at the UN, and usually involves both sides sending letters to the secretary general.

 

But this year is the first time Argentina has provided such a detailed and public account of its grievances, she says. It is not clear if Argentina plans to pursue any further action at the UN beyond the current protest.

 

The UN General Assembly has already passed non-binding resolutions urging the two to solve the dispute through negotiations. 

 

The UK says the islanders have the right to self-determination, and London will enter into negotiations on the status of the Falklands only if the islanders request it.

 

The status of the islands, known in Argentina as the Malvinas, is still a highly sensitive issue for Buenos Aires. 

 

In recent months, the Argentine government has stepped up its rhetoric on the issue and has sought support among its South American neighbours. 

 

In December, regional trading bloc Mercosur closed its ports to ships flying the Falkland Islands flag.

 

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-16993391

Video
2 years ago

Argentina to make formal UN complaint over Britain

Argentina is to make a formal complaint to the United Nations over what it calls the British "militarisation" of the Falkland Islands in the South Atlantic.

 

Argentine President Cristina Fernandez said Britain's recent actions amounted to a threat to international security.

 

Britain announced it was sending a destroyer, HMS Dauntless, to the Falkland Islands, which Argentina calls the Malvinas.

 

London described it as a routine deployment, but it has heightened tensions in the run-up to the 30th anniversary of the Falklands war.

 

Caroline Wyatt reports.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-16940313

Video
2 years ago

 

Argentina claims UK sent nuclear submarine to Falklands

Argentina's foreign minister has accused the UK of sending a nuclear-armed submarine to the South Atlantic, near the disputed Falkland Islands.

 

Hector Timerman made the claim at the United Nations on Friday, as Argentina made an official complaint about the UK's "militarisation" of the area.

 

The two countries went to war in 1982 over the British overseas territory.

 

 

2 years ago

Not sure that Great Britain can rely on US support now like when Reagan was in office. Barry isn't likely to be in favor of supporting an enemy of his fellow Marxist leader in Argentina nor does he have any love at all for one of (really any of) the US's primary allies! The sooner we get rid of the First Clown the better off everyone will be! As we see in North Africa and the Mid East his policies and weaknesses are causing a lot of strife and aggressive behavior.

Video and Radio
2 years ago

British Ambassador: 'Falklands defence hasn't changed'

Argentina has accused the United Kingdom of deploying nuclear weapons.

 

In a complaint to the UN, the Argentine Foreign Minister suggested Britain was militarising the waters and airspace around the Falkland Islands.

 

Argentina insists that the British military activity in the South Atlantic is uncalled for.

 

Mark Lyall Grant, the British Ambassador to the UN, responded to the accusations saying "the only thing that appears to have changed is the politics in Argentina".

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-16992848

 


I have also included in this post is a Video of a Radio broadcast of Former PM Mrs Thatcher that was that was broadcast to the British Public 5 years ago, which give's the British feeling of the Falklands. 

 

further to this there is a further 2 Radio reports one of them call "I counted them all out"

 

the BBC reporter is reoprting on the start of the War to re-take the Falkland in 1982 

I have also otained a Falkland Radio Broadcast, this was a British Report under the controls from Argentina 

 

2 years ago

I find the UN's response particularly puzzling.  This 'dispute' has as much negotiable merit as Cuba claiming Florida.

2 years ago

David, when has the UN ever made sense?  I shake my head all the time and wish there were a way around our involvement but that would be suicide, too.

2 years ago

Falklands dispute: Argentine union to boycott UK ships

Hollywood actor Sean Penn and Argentine President Cristina Fernandez
Oscar-winning actor Sean Penn weighed into the dispute after meeting Argentina's president
Argentina's transport workers' union says it will boycott ships flying the British flag because of the dispute over the Falkland Islands.

The union - which includes dock workers - said the measure would apply to all UK vessels reaching Argentina.

 

It is not clear how much impact the boycott will have.

 

Tension between the UK and Argentina over the Falklands has been rising in recent months as the 30th anniversary of the Falklands war approaches.

 

"We have resolved to boycott any ship with the British flag, or with the lying and invented flag of the Falklands, or with any flag of convenience which the British pirates use," the Argentine Confederation of Transport Workers said in a statement.

 

The announcement is the latest in a series of measures aimed at pressing Argentina's claim to sovereignty over the islands, which it calls the Malvinas.

 

In December, the South American trading bloc Mercosur closed its ports to ships flying the Falkland Islands flag.

 

And last week Argentina took its case to the UN general assembly, where it accused the UK of "militarising" the region and sending a nuclear-armed submarine to the South Atlantic.

 

The UK government has dismissed the claim of militarisation as "absurd" and says its defence posture in the Falklands has not changed.

 

It says there can be no negotiations on sovereignty as long as the Falkland Islanders wish to remain British.

 

Actor intervenes

The latest figure to back the Argentine cause is the Hollywood actor and activist Sean Penn.

 

After meeting Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner in Buenos Aires, he urged the UK to join talks on the dispute.

 

"I think that the world today is not going to tolerate any kind of ludicrous and archaic commitment to colonialist ideology," the Oscar-winning actor said.

His intervention has caused bemusement among the islanders.

 

"Ha Ha if Penn supported UK Brits would probably ask what gives an actor the right to have an opinion on the Falklands?" Lisa Watson, editor of the Falklands newspaper the Penguin News wrote on Twitter.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-17022603

2 years ago

MPs to visit Falklands amid UK tensions with Argentina

Port Stanley, Falkland Islands capital
This April marks the 30th anniversary of the start of the Falklands War
MPs from the Commons defence committee are set to visit the Falklands at a time of rising tensions with Argentina over the islands' future.

 

The trip was agreed in late 2011, but Labour member Thomas Docherty said it was "not a ramping-up thing".

 

He said it was "an appropriate place" for the committee to visit given the presence of British troops there. The last visit was in 1999.

 

The UK has rejected Argentina's calls for talks on the islands' sovereignty.

David Cameron has insisted there can be no negotiations as long as the Falkland islanders wish to remain British.

 

The 30th anniversary of the Falklands War between the UK and Argentina is approaching.

 

HMS Dauntless

 

Conservative committee member Julian Brazier told the BBC: "It's true that we have had a visit to the Falklands planned for some time.

 

"It's a location where there are British troops and as a such it's an appropriate place for the select committee to visit. It's actually several years since our last visit, but there's no specific date in the diary."

 

A committee spokesman said the visit had ben "decided at the back end of last year". Asked if the trip had been organised in response to recent events, Mr Brazier said: "It doesn't result from the last few weeks."

 

The Times reported that the visit had sparked anger from Argentine veterans.

The president of their association, Juan Mendicino, told the newspaper: "Argentina does not want war. It wants peace and the return of our islands through diplomatic negotiation. But the only thing that the English think about is war.

 

"We don't want visitors from your Parliament. We want the UN to intervene as it has done in disputes across the world."

 

Mr Docherty said the committee carried out a visit to a British base every six weeks and although the logistics of going to the Falklands were more complicated, "it's no different for us than visiting Colchester, Portsmouth or the Clyde".

 

He told the BBC News website: "I say this as kindly as I can about my colleagues, but the idea that a bunch of middle-aged parliamentarians is an escalation of Britain's military presence flatters us beyond belief.

 

"If the Argentine government genuinely believes that, well, they have other things to worry about.

 

"This is not a ramping-up thing. It's been on the books for some time. The last defence committee had wanted to go, but they simply couldn't get dates that worked for everyone."

 

He added: "I personally hope there will be an opportunity to pay our respects to those on both sides who lost their lives [in the war]."

 

'Colonialist'

The Times reported that the latest trip would take place in March and, if so, it would coincide with Prince William's tour of duty in the Falklands.

HMS Dauntless, one of the UK's largest and most powerful air defence destroyers, is also due to arrive in Falkands' waters next month.

 

The move has prompted an official complaint by Argentina's foreign minister to the United Nations about the UK's "militarisation" in the South Atlantic, but Britain has insisted the deployment is routine.

 

Argentina continues to press its claim of sovereignty over the islands - which it calls the Malvinas - but Mr Cameron has accused Buenos Aires of a "colonialist" attitude.

 

His comments were condemned by Argentina's Senate.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-17039197

 

 

Falklands War surrender telex to be auctioned
2 years ago

15 February 2012 Last updated at 15:10

 

Falklands War surrender telex to be auctioned

 

Bonhams undated handout photo of a copy of the original Falklands War Surrender Telex

News of the auction comes at a time of rising tensions between Britain and Argentina over the islands' future
A copy of the telex announcing to the UK government that Argentina had surrendered in the Falklands War is to be auctioned, a day after the 30th anniversary of the start of the war.

Sent by the commander of the British land forces, Maj Gen Jeremy Moore, the message states that the Argentinian forces have laid down their arms.

 

The telex adds the Falkland Islands are "once more under the government desired by their inhabitants".

 

It is expected to fetch up to £3,000.

 

News of the auction comes amid rising tensions between Britain and Argentina over the islands' future.

On Wednesday, it was announced that MPs from the Commons defence committee are to visit the islands.

 

Meanwhile, Prince William is on a tour of duty there and HMS Dauntless, one of the UK's largest and most powerful air defence destroyers, is due to arrive in Falklands waters next month.

 

The plan to send Dauntless prompted an official complaint by Argentina's foreign minister to the United Nations about the UK's "militarisation" in the South Atlantic, but Britain has insisted the deployment is routine.

 

The telex reads: "In Port Stanley at 9 o'clock pm Falkland Islands Time tonight 14th June 1982, Major General Menendes (sic) surrendered to me all the Argentine Forces in East and West Falkland, together with all their impedimenta.

 

'God save the Queen'

"Arrangements are in hand to assemble the men for return to Argentina, to gather in their arms and equipment, and to mark and make safe their munitions.

General Sir Jeremy Moore, former commander of British Land Forces Falkland Islands
Maj Gen Jeremy Moore was the author of the telex

"The Falkland Islands are once more under the government desired by their inhabitants. God save the Queen. Signed JJ Moore."

 

The message was sent via special forces to the Government Communications Headquarters on 14 June 1982 - six days before the hostilities officially ceased.

It came to auctioneers Bonhams from what was described as a naval-related source.

 

Bonhams chairman Robert Brooks said: "This remarkable document encapsulates perfectly the very moment of total capitulation by Argentina's 12,000-strong occupying forces in the Falklands.

 

"It is a rare find of great historical importance and will excite considerable interest from around the world."

 

It will go under the hammer on 3 April.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-17047498

2 years ago

The Argentinians are absolutely correct about one thing--the UN doesn't care in the least about the right of self-determination for the people most affected by this issue who are perfectly happy to remain British subjects.

2 years ago

David, I could not agree more.  I am of the firm opinion (yes this is opinion) that the UN should be shut down.  All it represents is a place where the other member countries can turn to the U.S. to do their dirty work and pay the bills for their dirty work.  I completely lost respect for that organization over the Iraq situation.  If they had put teeth into their demands with Saddem Hussein the U.S. never would have been there in a conflict.  They put sanctions on Iraq, sent in investigators that made little to no attempt to accomplish anything, going where they were led with no attempt to make thorough investigations.

 

They are totally ineffective and rely 100% of the US, UK and the other allies of the U.S.  I am hoping that the UK stays firm in their position supporting the people of the Falkland Islands and that the U.S. supports the U.K, as well.  I hope that Obama will show as much concern and support for this as he felt he had to show Egypt and Libya.

Falklands tension: Argentina condemns UK MPs visit
2 years ago

Port Stanley, Falkland Islands capital
This April marks the 30th anniversary of the start of the Falklands War
Argentina has condemned a planned visit to the Falkland Islands by UK MPs as another sign of Britain's "militarisation" of the South Atlantic.

The plans for a visit by members of the Commons defence select committee emerged on Tuesday.

 

Tension over the islands - which Argentina claims as the Malvinas - has been rising in the run-up to the 30th anniversary of the Falklands war.

 

The UK has rejected Argentina's calls for talks on the islands' sovereignty.

 

"The UK has transformed the Malvinas into the cornerstone of a system of military bases thousands of kilometres from London to control the South Atlantic, inter-oceanic routes, and the approaches to Antarctica," Argentina's foreign ministry said in a statement.

 

It also repeated its claim that Britain had sent a nuclear submarine to the region.

 

'Appropriate'

 

Members of the select committee have said their visit was not intended to exacerbate tensions with Argentina.

 

Labour member Thomas Docherty said the Falklands were "an appropriate place" for the committee to visit, given the presence of British troops there. The last such visit was in 1999.

 

The UK government has dismissed Argentine accusations of militarisation as "absurd" and says its defensive military posture has not changed.

 

Prime Minister David Cameron has insisted there can be no negotiations on sovereignty as long as the Falkland islanders wish to remain British.

 

The MPs' visit is expected to take place in March.

 

If so, it would coincide with Prince William's tour of duty in the Falklands as an air force helicopter rescue pilot.

 

HMS Dauntless, one of the UK's most modern warships, is also due to arrive in Falkands' waters next month in what the government says is a routine deployment.

 

On 2 April, both nations will mark the 30th anniversary of the Falklands War, which began with an Argentine invasion of the islands and ended in victory for a British task force sent to recover them.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-17053609
UK minister to visit Falklands amid Argentina tensions
2 years ago

UK minister to visit Falklands amid Argentina tensions
Universities and Science Minister David Willetts
David Willetts will stop over in the Falklands en route to the British Antarctic Survey in Rothera

Science Minister David Willetts has become the latest UK politician to announce a visit to the Falklands.

 

On Wednesday, it emerged that MPs from the Commons defence select committee were planning a trip to the islands - news which prompted anger in Argentina.

 

A spokesman for Mr Willetts said he would make a "transiting visit" en route to an engagement in Antarctica.

 

Tensions have risen in recent weeks between the UK and Argentina over the sovereignty of the Falklands.

 

April marks the 30th anniversary of the start of the Falklands War.

Policy matters

Mr Willetts' spokesman said he was making a "long-planned" tour of the British Antarctic Survey in Rothera and would call at the Falklands on the outbound and inbound legs of his journey to pick up connecting flights.

 

He said the Conservative minister did not have any "official" engagements planned during his stopover.

 

But the Times newspaper reported that Mr Willetts would hold talks with British military commanders while on the islands.

 

He is also due to host a dinner with Governor Nigel Haywood and hold discussions on policy matters, including whether the islands' students should have to pay tuition fees, the newspaper said.

 

Mr Willetts also reiterated the position expressed by Prime Minister David Cameron that the Falklands would remain British as long as islanders wanted to do so.

 

"What matters is the right of self-determination of the people in the Falklands," he told the Times.

 

Argentina has called on the UK to enter into negotiations over the islands' future - something Britain has refused to do.

 

The impasse has sparked strong words from both sides and prompted United Nations secretary general Ban Ki-moon to issue a statement expressing "concern about the increasingly strong exchanges".

 

News of the visit by the defence select committee was described by Argentina's foreign ministry as another sign of Britain's "militarisation" of the South Atlantic.

 

It has also accused the UK of sending a nuclear submarine to the region and condemned the current tour of duty being carried out in the Falklands by Prince William.

 

Labour MP Thomas Docherty, a member of the defence committee, insisted the visit was "not a ramping-up thing" and it was right for MPs to travel to a place where British troops were stationed.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-17063628
2 years ago

Waiting for the UN to do ANYTHING is a pie in the sky thought!  In my opinion we should throw the UN out of the US -- raze the building and build something that will actually DO something to improve relationships with countries throughout the world.

 

As for Argentina --Remember the song ---"Don't cry for me Argentina".  I'm sure the Brits are saying "don't cry to us Argentina". 

2 years ago

Tara Jane, I love the way you state: I'am sure the Brits are saying "don't cry for us Argentina".

 

the feeling of the British Public at the moment is that something will happen, but we don't know when, and the people who I know, who are in the forces are now on standby, so they tell me, we will just have to wait and see what happens, it is still early days. 

2 years ago

Ray, I would like to see the U.S. step up and stand behind the U.K. and the people of the Falklands in this; I think that Argentina would back off if they saw that this was more than the U.K.  Who can predict what Obama will do.

2 years ago

I can predict what Obama will do.....if it can "hurt" the United States...Obama will sign off on it.

2 years ago

And if it will benefit him, "I will send my troops to assist you so that I can claim that I  helped the Falklanders and that the U.K. could not do this without my intervention."  Is that enough I's and my's?

2 years ago

It's pure Obama.   He actually feels, the community organizer he was, that he is the smartest and most clever President to ever occupy the White House.   Unfortunately, his popularity rating is going up because of the bump in the economy.   What Americans need to know is this;    if not tampered with by the government, a recession has always recovered on its own.   There's an excellent study "Recessions Since 1948 in America."   Everyone needs to research this and read it.   I read it for the first time three years ago and it spells it out....the duration of each recession.    Obama intentionally tampered long and hard with the real estate recovery so much so that we are still five years from it's "natural" recovery.    It would've taken 16 months to recover if Obama had done the right thing in early 2009...take care of our SMALL BUSINESSES, the job engine in our country.   However, Obama didn't do that.   His choice was to direct one solid year of his time on his legacy healthcare bill.  

 

Everything Obama touches fails.   Has anyone else noticed that?

Argentina intellectuals query Falkland Islands policy
2 years ago

23 February 2012 Last updated at 21:44

 

Argentina intellectuals query Falkland Islands policy

A left-wing activist sets fire on a British flag during a demonstration outside British drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline Laboratories in Buenos Aires February 16
The Falklands row has sparked protests in recent weeks in Argentina
A group of Argentine intellectuals has challenged the government's ambition to take control of the Falkland Islands from the British.

 

The 17 writers urged the government to recognise the right of the islanders to decide their own future.

 

They also say Argentina's demand for negotiations with the UK contradicts its insistence on sovereignty.

 

Tension has been rising in the run-up to the 30th anniversary of the war the two countries fought over the islands.

 

The intellectuals issued a joint statement titled An Alternative Vision of the Malvinas (Falklands).

 

Among the signatories are the journalist Jorge Lanata, historians Luis Alberto Romero and Hilda Sabato, cultural critic Beatriz Sarlo, and constitutional law expert Daniel Sabsay.

 

'Nationalist agitation'

 

They argued that the government's actions were out of proportion to the importance of the issue, and had little relation to the "major political, social and economic problems" the country faces.

 

"A climate of nationalist agitation driven once again by both governments seems to be affecting a great number of our leaders from both the government and opposition," the document said.

 

It argued that Argentine society had still not faced up to its responsibility for the invasion of the Falklands in 1982, and should recognise that the use of force was "unjustifiable".

 

It pointed out that Argentina's demand for bilateral negotiations with the UK including the issue of sovereignty contradicted the insistence - enshrined in the national constitution - that Argentina's claim to sovereignty was "non-negotiable".

 

The statement urged genuine dialogue with the UK and the Falkland Islanders, and a recognition that the islanders have the right to self-determination.

 

"Respecting their way of life means giving up the intention to impose on them a sovereignty, citizenship and government they don't want," it said.

 

'Traitors'

 

Many Argentine web users have reacted negatively to the statement.

 

Readers posting comments on the website of the newspaper La Nacion rejected the arguments, with some labelling the authors "traitors" and "sell-outs".

 

Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner's government has stepped up its diplomatic campaign to assert sovereignty over the islands in recent months, rallying regional support and accusing the UK of "militarising" the South Atlantic.

 

Britain, which has controlled the islands since 1833, has said there can be no negotiations on sovereignty as long as the Falkland Islanders wish to remain British.

 

On 2 April, both nations will mark the 30th anniversary of the Falklands War, which began with an Argentine invasion of the islands and ended in victory for a British task force sent to recover them.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-17148157

Falklands tension: Argentina turns away cruise ships
2 years ago

27 February 2012 Last updated at 17:59


Falklands tension: Argentina turns away cruise ships

Port Stanley, Falkland Islands capital
This April marks the 30th anniversary of the start of the Falklands War
Two cruise ships carrying almost 3,000 passengers have been turned away from an Argentine port, apparently because they had visited the Falklands.

The Adonia and the Star Princess had arrived off Tierra Del Fuego, on the country's southern tip, on Monday but were prevented from docking in Ushuaia.

 

British diplomats in Argentina are trying to clarify what happened.

 

Tensions have risen recently, as the 30th anniversary of the Falklands war approaches.

 

Argentina claims ownership of the islands, which it calls the Malvinas, but the UK has rejected calls for talks on the archipelago's sovereignty.

 

Around 3,000 people live on the islands, most of whom are British citizens.

 

The Adonia and the Star Princess, which are both operated by the Carnival Group, arrived off the port of Ushuaia on Monday morning.

 

The BBC's World Affairs Correspondent Peter Biles said both ships are reported to have been denied entry and both vessels had just visited the Falkland Islands.

 

Jane Archer, one of the passengers on board the Adonia, told the BBC: "It's simply the fact that we were in the Falklands.

 

'No inkling'

"They said the fact that we've been there means that we can't come in to Ushuaia.

 

"I've not heard of anything like this before and I don't think anybody had any inkling at all that this was going to happen."

 

She said: "Everything was planned, we were all going to be going on excursions from Ushaia today. I don't think anybody knew anything was going to go wrong, certainly not the captain as far as I'm aware."

 

The Foreign Office said it was very concerned to hear the two ships had been refused access to Ushuaia.

 

A spokesperson said there could be no justification for interference in free and legitimate commerce.

 

It is understood the two vessels are now heading for Punta Arenas in Chile.

 

Monday is a public holiday in Argentina and no official comment has been made about the incident.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-17184955

Falklands dispute: Argentina 'urges UK import ban'
2 years ago

29 February 2012 Last updated at 00:48


Falklands dispute: Argentina 'urges UK import ban'

P&O cruise ship Adonia docking in Chile after being turned away by Argentina
On Monday two cruise ships were refused entry to Argentina after visiting the Falklands
The Argentine government is calling on the country's top companies to stop importing goods from the UK, according to the state news agency Telam.

 

Industry Minister Debora Giorgi called the bosses of at least 20 firms to urge them to replace imports from Britain with goods produced elsewhere, it said.

The move is linked to the dispute with Britain over the Falkland Islands, which Argentina claims as the Malvinas.

 

Tension has been rising ahead of the 30th anniversary of the Falklands war.

 

The industry ministry is trying to reduce Argentina's trade deficit with the UK and establish policies that favour countries that recognize Argentina's territorial claim, Telam reported.

 

In recent months the government of President Cristina Fernandez has stepped up its campaign to assert sovereignty over the Falklands, rallying regional support for its claim.

 

It also has a policy of restricting imports through formal and informal means to try to stop foreign currency reserves from flowing out of the country.

 

'Sadness'

On Monday two cruise ships were turned back from the Argentine port of Ushuaia, apparently because they had visited the Falklands.

 

UK foreign office minister Jeremy Browne expressed "sadness and frustration" at that move.

 

"We enter the relationship with Argentina in a spirit of friendship, and it's source of sadness to us that they don't always do the same," he told parliament.

 

The UK, which has controlled the Falklands since 1833, says there can be no negotiations on sovereignty as long as the 3,000 Islanders wish to remain British.

 

On 2 April, both nations will mark the 30th anniversary of the Falklands War, which began with an Argentine invasion of the islands and ended in victory for a British task force sent to recover them.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-17200528

Argentina pursuing policy of confrontation, says No10
2 years ago

29 February 2012 Last updated at 17:46

 


 

 

Argentina pursuing policy of confrontation, says No 10
Cruise ships dock in Chile a day after being turned away by Argentina
Two cruise ships were denied mooring in Argentina, apparently because they had visited the Falklands

Downing Street has accused Argentina of pursuing a "policy of confrontation" over the Falkland Islands.

 

It comes amid reports that top Argentine companies are being told by their government to stop importing goods from the UK.

 

PM David Cameron's spokesman said the move was "counterproductive" and was a misreading of British resolve over the disputed islands.

 

Tension has been rising ahead of the 30th anniversary of the Falklands War.

 

According to the state news agency Telam, industry minister Debora Giorgi called the bosses of at least 20 firms to urge them to replace imports from Britain with goods produced elsewhere.

 

Meanwhile, Argentina's top diplomat in the UK - Osvaldo Marsico - was summoned to the Foreign Office on Wednesday to explain the import ban.

 

 

 

A Foreign Office spokesman said: "We made clear that such actions against legitimate commercial activity were a matter of concern not just for the UK, but for the EU as a whole, and that we expect the EU to lodge similar concerns with Argentine authorities."

 

Officials were also expected to discuss Argentina's decision to turn back two cruise ships from the Argentine port of Ushuaia on Monday, apparently because they had visited the Falklands - which Argentina claims as the Malvinas.

 

Mr Cameron's spokesman told reporters at a regular briefing in Westminster:

"It is clearly very sad that Argentina continues with their policy of confrontation instead of co-operation.

 

"We think that is counterproductive and also a complete misreading of Britain's resolve on this issue.

 

"The UK is also a major investor in Argentina and we import goods from Argentina. It is not in Argentina's economic interest to put up barriers of this sort.

 

"The right approach here is one of co-operation, not confrontation," he added.

 

Buenos Aries has complained to the United Nations of British "militarisation" of the south Atlantic after the deployment of a new Royal Navy warship to the Falklands and Prince William's tour of duty on the islands.

 

 

 

The UK, which has controlled the Falklands since 1833, says there can be no negotiations on sovereignty as long as the 3,000 Islanders wish to remain British.

 

On 2 April, both nations will mark the 30th anniversary of the Falklands War, which began with an Argentine invasion of the islands and ended in victory for a British task force sent to recover them.

 

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-17205918

Argentina leader Fernandez seeks Falklands flight link
2 years ago

Argentina leader Fernandez seeks Falklands flight link

Argentine President Cristina Fernandez addressing Congress in Buenos Aires 
President Fernandez says the UK's refusal to negotiate sovereignty is "incomprehensible"

 

Argentine President Cristina Fernandez says she wants to renegotiate an agreement with the UK on flights to the Falkland Islands from South America.

The islands are currently served by weekly flights from Chile.

 

But Ms Fernandez said she wanted the air link to be operated by Argentina's state-owned airline direct from Buenos Aires.

 

In response, the UK government said any discussions on flights were a matter for the Falkland Islands government.

 

But the Foreign Office said it expected Argentina to honour its commitments under a 1999 agreement allowing flights from Chile.

 

In recent months Argentina has stepped up its territorial claim to the Falklands, which it calls the Malvinas.

 

President Fernandez was speaking in a state-of-the-nation address to the Argentine parliament.

 

Blockade fear

 

She repeated her demand that the UK enter negotiations on the sovereignty of the Falklands, and again accused Britain of "militarising" the South Atlantic.

 

And she said she had asked her foreign minister to renegotiate the 1999 agreement with Britain allowing flights from Chile to the Falklands.

 

"We want flights to the islands from mainland Argentina - Buenos Aires - operated by our flag-carrier, Aerolineas Argentinas," she said.

 

There have been concerns in the Falklands that Argentina might block the flights operated by Chilean airline LAN, which are the islands' only air link with South America.

 

"The weekly flight to and from Chile is a well-established route, and is valued greatly by the Falkland Islanders, including the Chilean community and others," a UK Foreign Office spokeswoman told the BBC.

 

"It would be deeply disappointing and utterly unjustifiable if Argentina put pressure on this flight to be suspended".

 

The spokeswoman added that if Argentina wanted to promote air links between the continent and the islands, it should reconsider a ban on charter flights through its airspace.

 

"President Fernandez's current policy of seeking to isolate and dictate to the Falkland Islanders - from the harassment of fishing vessels to the closure of shipping ports - is indefensible and will not succeed," she said.

 

Rising tension

Argentina has stepped up diplomatic pressure on Britain to negotiate over the Falklands in the run-up to the 30th anniversary of the Falklands War, which falls next month.

 

Earlier this week two cruise ships were turned back from an Argentine port after visiting the Falklands, and Argentina's industry minister urged Argentine companies to stop buying goods from Britain.

 

The UK says it will not discuss sovereignty as long as the Falkland Islanders wished to remain British.

 

Tension over the islands has been inflamed by offshore oil exploration by British companies, something Argentina sees as an attempt to "steal" natural resources.

 

Critics in Argentina have accused Ms Fernandez of using the dispute to distract attention from domestic problems, including high inflation.

 

On 2 April, both nations will mark the 30th anniversary of the 1982 Falklands War, which began with an Argentine invasion of the islands and ended in victory for a British task force sent to recover them.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-17227792

Argentina to open Falklands museum, says Fernandez
2 years ago


Argentina to open Falklands museum, says Fernandez

Argentine President Cristina Fernandez addressing Congress in Buenos Aires
President Fernandez has stepped up diplomatic pressure on Britain to negotiate over the Falklands

Argentina will open a museum to honour its soldiers who died during the Falklands conflict with the UK in 1982, President Cristina Fernandez has said.

 

She said the $20m (£13m) museum would be inaugurated in August 2013.

It would be in the former navy school used as a detention centre during military rule in Argentina in 1976-83.

 

Argentina has stepped up its territorial claim to the Falkland Islands ahead of next month's 30th anniversary of the conflict.

 

Last week, President Fernandez said she wanted to renegotiate an agreement with London on flights to the islands from South America.

 

The Falklands, which Argentina calls the Malvinas, are currently served by a weekly flight from Chile.

 

The Argentine industry minister last week urged the country's companies to stop buying goods from Britain.

 

The UK says it will not discuss sovereignty as long as the Falkland Islanders wish to remain British.

 

On 2 April, both nations will mark the 30th anniversary of the 1982 Falklands War, which began with an Argentine invasion of the islands and ended in victory for a British task force sent to recover them.

 

During the conflict, 649 Argentine and 255 British men were killed. Three Falkland islanders also died.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-17267714

 

 

Falkland Islands oil dispute: UK hits back at Argentina
2 years ago

 

Falkland Islands oil dispute: UK hits back at Argentina

Foreign minister of Argentina, Hector Timmerman: "We will defend our natural resources"

 

The UK has hit back at Argentina's threats of court action over Falkland Islands oil exploration, calling its behaviour "illegal intimidation".

 

Foreign minister Hector Timmerman had threatened legal action against firms drilling off the UK territory, over which Argentina claims sovereignty.

 

But the UK Foreign Office said it was a legitimate commercial venture.

 

Prime Minister David Cameron said Britain would "continue to protect and defend" the islands.

 

In threatening legal action against oil prospectors, Mr Timmerman had told reporters: "The gas and oil that is found in the South Atlantic belongs to the Argentinian people.

 

"All these companies are entering illegal territory."

 

UN resolutions

 

He warned that legal action would target oil companies as well as firms providing them with financial and logistic support.

 

It was the latest in a series of measures taken in recent months by Argentina to assert its claim to sovereignty over the Falklands, which it calls the Malvinas.

 

Mr Timmerman said companies involved in oil exploration in Falklands waters were "violating UN resolutions" calling for talks on sovereignty.

 

The UK Foreign Office said the right to develop the hydrocarbon sector was an "integral part" of the Falkland islanders' right to self-determination.

 

"These latest attempts to damage the economic livelihoods of the Falkland Islands people regrettably reflect a pattern of behaviour by the Argentine government," the Foreign Office said.

 

"From harassing Falklands shipping to threatening the islanders' air links with Chile, Argentina's efforts to intimidate the Falklands are illegal, unbecoming and wholly counter-productive," it added

 

Several British companies are searching for oil and gas in Falklands waters.

 

One of them - Rockhopper - says it has found significant reserves and is seeking investment partners to begin production.

 

The search for oil has inflamed tension over the disputed islands ahead of the 30th anniversary of the Falklands War.

 

On 2 April 1982 Argentina invaded the Falklands, only to be defeated by a British task force sent to recover them.

 

The UK says there will be no negotiations on sovereignty as long as the Falkland islanders wish to remain British.

 

Mr Cameron said: "The people of the Falkland Islands could not be clearer that they want to continue their status as an overseas territory of the United Kingdom.

 

"As long as they want that, that is not going to change."

 

Nearly three decades after the Falklands War, why do the UK and Argentina each claim the islands are theirs?

 

 

More on This Story



This post was modified from its original form on 16 Mar, 5:05
2 years ago

Excellent thread, Ray, as usual!!  

U.S. stays neutral on U.K.'s Falkland dispute
2 years ago

 

U.S. stays neutral on U.K.'s Falkland dispute

Agence France-Presse March 17, 2012

 

 

 The United States will remain neutral in Britain's dispute with Argentina over sovereignty of the Falkland Islands, a senior U.S. official said Friday after British Prime Minister David Cameron's White House visit.
"Our position remains one of neutrality," the official, who did not wish to be named, said, adding that Washington also recommends a negotiated solution to the decades-long dispute.
Cameron met with President Barack Obama on Wednesday at the White House to discuss the U.S.-British alliance.
The prime minister concluded his U.S. trip Thursday by visiting the New York City memorial to victims of the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.
Cameron said he discussed the Falklands with Obama, and the president said he preferred the "status quo" regarding sovereignty over the South Atlantic islands.
The roughly 3,100 residents of the Falklands prefer to remain under British protection, Cameron said, and he anticipated no changes in Britain's claim to the islands.
"The United States recognizes the de facto U.K. administration of the islands, but takes no position regarding the sovereignty claims of either party," the U.S. official said.
"The U.S. government supports U.K. and Argentine cooperation on practical matters and urges a peaceful resolution to the overall issue."
Cameron said the dispute has heated up ahead of the 30th anniversary of the twomonth war between Britain and Argentina over control of the Falklands.
Argentine troops seized the islands on April 2, 1982, only to be routed by British forces 74 days later. In all, 649 Argentine troops, 255 British troops and three Falkland Islanders were killed in the conflict.
Adding to the renewed tensions is Britain's decision to allow offshore oil drilling near the islands, which lie 400 kilometres east of the South American mainland.


This post was modified from its original form on 18 Mar, 12:37
Peru cancels Royal Navy visit over Falklands
2 years ago

Peru cancels Royal Navy visit over Falklands

HMS Montrose
HMS Montrose was due to dock near Lima for a friendly visit to Peru

Peru has cancelled a visit by a Royal Navy frigate as an act of solidarity with Argentina in its dispute with the UK over the Falkland Islands.

 

HMS Montrose had been due to dock at the El Callao naval base this week.

 

The UK Foreign Office said officials could have raised concerns with Foreign Office Minister Jeremy Browne when he was in the country last week.

 

Argentina insists the Falkland Islands, which it calls Las Malvinas, belong to it.

 

'Routine deployment'

Peruvian Foreign Minister Rafael Roncagliolo told news agency Andina Peru he supported Argentina's "legitimate rights" over the Falkland Islands.

 

He said: "This decision has been taken in the spirit of Latin American solidarity commitments undertaken in the framework of Unasur (Union of South American Nations) with regard to the legitimate rights of Argentina in the sovereignty dispute over the Falkland Islands, South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands and the surrounding waters."

 

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) said the UK regretted Peru's decision .

 

A spokesman said: "HMS Montrose was scheduled to make a short visit to Peru as part of a routine deployment to the region.

 

"This was agreed as an act of friendship and co-operation between Peru and the UK. Ship visits are a sovereign decision for states, but we regret that Peru has revoked its previous agreement to this visit.

 

"This is despite the Peruvian government having had the opportunity on Friday to raise any concerns it had about this agreed co-operation."

 

The FCO said it had informed the Peruvian foreign ministry that the ship would have been delayed for technical reasons, but "there was no mutual decision to cancel".

 

Argentina has taken several steps recently to assert its claim that the Falklands belong to its government.

 

The UK and Argentina are preparing to mark the 30th anniversary of the Falklands War.

 

On 2 April 1982, Argentina invaded the Falklands, only to be defeated by a British task force sent to recover them.

 

The UK says there will be no negotiations on sovereignty as long as the Falkland islanders wish to remain British.

 

'No negotiations'

Last week Argentine minister Hector Timmerman threatened legal action against firms drilling off the islands.

 

But the UK Foreign Office said it was a legitimate commercial venture.

 

Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner's government has also accused the UK of "militarising" the South Atlantic and criticised Prince William's deployment there after he was posted to work as a RAF rescue helicopter pilot.

 

Prime Minister David Cameron has said Britain will "continue to protect and defend" the islands and Downing Street has accused Argentina of pursuing a "policy of confrontation" over the Falkland Islands.

 

Following the Peruvian government's actions, the FCO spokesman added: "The UK government remains fully committed to the Falkland islanders' right to self determination. This position will not change."

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-17442215

 

Pregnant woman's extradition to Argentina blocked
2 years ago

20 March 2012 Last updated at 14:28


Pregnant woman's extradition to Argentina blocked

Scales of Justice
The woman had returned to the UK after fleeing from Argentina while on bail

A woman due to give birth in May has avoided being extradited to Argentina to face drugs charges because of prison conditions in the country.

 

Lucy Wright, also known as Robertson, argued at the High Court extradition would breach her human rights.

 

Ms Wright, 29, originally from Bolton but now living in London, was arrested in Buenos Aires in 2007 while carrying more than 6kg of cocaine.

 

Her successful appeal is a rare example of the courts blocking an extradition.

 

Ms Wright was detained in March 2007 at the Argentine capital's international airport, shortly before she was to board a flight to the UK. She was bailed before trial, but fled to Brazil and from there back to the UK.

 

Two years later, she was arrested at the request of the Argentine authorities and taken to court in London to face extradition on the original drugs charge. A judge approved the application, but Ms Wright appealed.

 

The court heard that Ms Wright could not be extradited currently because she is in an advanced stage of pregnancy. If she were to be extradited following the birth in May, she would be required to leave her child in the care of her sister in the UK, it heard.

 

Alun Jones QC, defending Ms Wright, said she could be held for more than two years before trial in Argentina and could expect to serve a sentence in inhuman and degrading prison conditions.

 

The High Court also heard that Ms Wright had planned to challenge the Metropolitan Police and the Crown Prosecution Service for failing to investigate or charge her. Her lawyers said that she had been offering for three years to plead guilty to drugs offences in the UK.

 

Conspiracy to import

Mr Justice Silber said: "The appellant, who wishes to be tried in this country, has stated first that she admits she would plead guilty to a charge of attempting to import cocaine into the United Kingdom if charged in this jurisdiction, and/or being a party to a conspiracy to import into this country the cocaine found in her possession in Buenos Aires Airport."

 

The High Court stopped the extradition on human rights grounds, saying that Ms Wright could be subjected to inhuman and degrading treatment.

 

"It follows, in the light of our decision on the extradition proceedings that the Crown Prosecution Service will be free to bring proceedings against the appellant," said Mr Justice Silber.

 

The judge, sitting with Lord Justice Thomas, said they had blocked the extradition to Argentina partly because its authorities had failed to provide information relating to the prison conditions that Ms Wright would face.

 

"There is no basis whatsoever for assuming or believing that future attempts by the government of Argentina to obtain extradition orders will fail," said Mr Justice Silber.

 

"Our decision may well have been different if the government of Argentina had adduced proper evidence or given undertakings."

 

Ms Wright's case is a highly unusual victory amid continuing controversy over the UK's 2003 Extradition Act. Critics of the legislation and the related treaties with countries outside of Europe say the courts should have the power to decide whether a suspect should be tried in the UK.

 

British judges do not usually intervene in extraditions unless there are exceptional human rights considerations.

 

An independent review of extradition arrangements concluded the system was broadly fair. However, amid pressure from backbench MPs, Prime Minister David Cameron says Theresa May, the Home Secretary, is now conducting her own "proper, sober, thoughtful review".

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-17449535

Prince William returns home after duty in Falklands
2 years ago

21 March 2012 Last updated at 11:41


Prince William returns home after duty in Falklands

Prince William's deployment was 'entirely routine', Buckingham Palace said (Footage courtesy of the MoD) [ Video]

Prince William has returned to Britain after being deployed to the Falkland Islands.

 

His deployment, as an RAF helicopter search and rescue pilot, caused a diplomatic row with Argentina, which claims the islands, known there as the Malvinas.

 

It came amid tensions between the UK and Argentina, as the 30th anniversary of the Falklands conflict looms.

 

Clarence House said he had returned after an "entirely routine" tour.

 

A spokesman for St James's Palace said: "He will have a short period of leave like the rest of his crew, before returning to work at RAF Valley."

 

Buenos Aires, which claims the Falklands are occupied Argentine territory, had condemned the prince's tour as a "provocation".

 

But UK Foreign Secretary William Hague said there was nothing provocative about "routine military movements".

 

The Duke of Cambridge was part of a four-man crew in the territory providing cover for both the civilian and military population.

 

The six-week deployment saw Flight Lieutenant Wales operate as a Sea King co-pilot, a post he has held at RAF Valley in Anglesey since qualifying.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-17458841

 

Falkland Islands: Argentina's dissenters
2 years ago

28 March 2012 Last updated at 01:12

Falkland Islands: Argentina's dissenters

dissenters By Vladimir HernandezBBC Mundo, Buenos Aires

Port Stanley - file photo

 

28 March 2012 Last updated at 01:12 Falkland Islands: Argentina's dissenters By Vladimir HernandezBBC Mundo, Buenos Aires

 

Tensions have risen as the 30th anniversary of the Falklands War approaches

 

For many Argentines, their country's claim of sovereignty over the Falkland Islands, or Malvinas as they are called in Spanish, is clear. Recent opinion polls suggest that two-thirds of the population support this view. 

 

Amid such strong backing for the government's position, dissenting voices find it hard to engage debate.

 

"I'm not really bothered about the claim over the Malvinas.

 

I don't think it changes much to have them [as part of Argentina] or not," says historian Luis Alberto Romero. 

 

"What does worry me is the rise of a nationalistic feeling that can cause traumas in our society," he says, referring to public support for the country's military regime when it decided to invade the South Atlantic islands in 1982.

 

After the war, many Argentines realised they had supported a regime that was leading one of the fiercest repressions in Latin America at the time.

Mr Romero is part of a group of 20 well-known Argentine intellectuals that recently issued a statement criticising the government's stance over the islands. 

 

"The idea of getting the islands back cannot be the priority of the [Argentine] claim. There must be a negotiation process," says sociologist Vicente Palermo, one of the signatories.

 

That must involve dialogue with the Falkland islanders themselves, Mr Palermo says. "Right now that is probably difficult, but not impossible."

 

Those who signed the statement - including leading academics, journalists and historians - have found that their views echoed in other parts of Argentine society.

 

"I definitely think that the islanders must be taken into account, as after all they are the ones who live there," says Horacio Benitez, an Argentine veteran of the Falklands War. 

 

Mr Benitez was on the front line during the conflict. He experienced hand-to-hand combat against British troops, and he was shot in the head. It almost killed him.

 

"I have proven my patriotism, so I'm not afraid to say what I think about Malvinas. The government is leaving out the islanders in their claim," he says.

 

Page 1  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-17271430



This post was modified from its original form on 28 Mar, 4:01
2 years ago

Backlash

 

This is a controversial position in Argentina.

 

A day after the intellectuals published their statement, Argentina's main tabloid, Cronicas, put four of them on the front page under the headline: "Supporting the Pirates."

 

In Argentina, the word pirates is used pejoratively to describe the British when referring to the Falklands issue.

 

In other media, too, there were strong words against the group.

 

"As soon as you say anything different about the subject you are immediately branded a traitor," says Mr Romero.

 

"And that is what happens when you put such an emphasis on sovereignty. You end up with extreme nationalistic feelings," he says.

 

The Falklands issue can lead to passionate debates among friends and within families.

 

"I think it touches a deep and sensitive fibre in our society," says documentary film-maker Tamara Florin.

 

Ms Florin was born in 1981, a year before the Falklands war started. She says she knows many people of her age who have similarly critical views about the current Argentine sovereignty claim.

Vicente Palermo


Vicente Palermo and other intellectuals want to see a dialogue with those living in the Falkland Islands

"The self-determination of the islanders is being ignored. Nobody seems to remember that they actually live there."

 

Five years ago, Ms Florin went to the Falklands to make a documentary. She says was astonished at how different the islanders were.

 

"I met many people who had lived in the islands for a long time. I was the one treated like an invader," she says.

 

She believes that Argentines who support the sovereignty claim do not know how different, culturally, the Falklands are.

 

"We cannot be neighbours to a population and not listen to their own views".

 

"Why do we actually want these islands? Nobody [in the Argentine government] responds to this question," she says.

 

For some Argentines, the main problem is the lack of free debate about the issue.

 

"You can hardly exchange arguments, because you will be immediately attacked. That worries me," says Mr Palermo.

 

"Many people act like football hooligans when referring to the Falklands, but they are only repeating a militaristic view which led to a war 30 years ago," says Ms Florin.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-17271430

The Falklands War: Key dates
2 years ago

30 March 2012 Last updated at 10:16

The Falklands War: Key dates

Thirty years ago Argentina invaded the Falkland Islands, which had been held by Britain for 150 years, leading to a short but bloody war.

 

In the two months of fighting that followed, 255 British and about 650 Argentine servicemen were killed, along with three Falklands civilians, before Argentine forces surrendered.

 

Argentina still claims sovereignty over the islands, which it calls Las Malvinas.

Here are the key dates in the conflict.


2 April 1982 Argentina invades

 

The Sun newspaper with the headline IT'S WAR [video]

 

Argentine forces invade the Falkland Islands, entering the capital Port Stanley early in the morning. The 80-man garrison of Royal Marines is outnumbered and Governor Sir Rex Hunt orders it to surrender at 09:15 local time. Other British South Atlantic territories including South Georgia are seized shortly afterwards.

 

 


 

 

3-4 April 1982 UN condemns Argentina

British Task Force chiefs inspect a map of South America 

 

 

The UN Security Council condemns the invasion and demands the immediate withdrawal of Argentine forces. Soon afterwards, the British nuclear submarine HMS Conqueror sets sail from Faslane naval base in Scotland.

5 April 1982     Task force sets sail     

British soldiers prepare to leave for the Falkland Islands [video]

 

Aircraft carriers HMS Hermes and HMS Invincible sail from Portsmouth as part of a task force of more than 100 ships. It will take nearly three weeks to travel the 8,000 miles to the South Atlantic. Foreign Secretary Lord Carrington resigns over the invasion and is replaced by Francis Pym.

 


 

 

19 April 1982 Haig plan dismissed

Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and US Secretary of State Alexander Haig

 

 

US Secretary of State Alexander Haig attempts to mediate with the Argentine military junta, travelling between London and Buenos Aires to negotiate. His proposals include calls for Argentina to withdraw and for an interim administration on the islands. However, the junta rejects the proposals and signals its insistence on adding guarantees for eventual Argentine sovereignty. The talks are effectively over.

 

 


 

 

21 April 1982 Weather hampers SAS

 

Sea King helicopters attempt to land

 

The British destroyer HMS Antrim arrives off South Georgia, but a reconnaissance operation by the SAS on Fortuna Glacier almost ends in disaster after two helicopters crash in severe weather conditions. A third helicopter manages to extract the SAS men.

 


 

 

25 April 1982 South Georgia recaptured

Royal Marines

 

 

South Georgia is retaken by Royal Marines, who quickly overcome the small Argentine garrison following a bombardment by Royal Navy ships. Argentine submarine Santa Fe is badly damaged after being attacked by British helicopters off the capital Grytviken. Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher tells reporters to "rejoice" at the news

 

Page 1   http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-17444526



This post was modified from its original form on 30 Mar, 8:15
2 years ago

 

1 May 1982 Stanley airfield bombed

 

British Vulcan bomber

 

Following initial landings by SAS and SBS special forces on the islands, British Vulcan bombers launch the first air raid on Stanley airfield. The mission is a logistical nightmare, involving several tanker aircraft refuelling bombers during the 8,000-mile round trip from Ascension Island.

 

 


 

 

2 May 1982 General Belgrano sunk

 

Argentine General Belgrano sinks after being torpedoed [video]

 

The veteran Argentine cruiser General Belgrano is torpedoed and sunk by British submarine HMS Conqueror. It causes the biggest single loss of life in the Falklands war as more than 320 Argentines are killed. The sinking becomes a cause celebre for British anti-war campaigners, who claim the ship was sailing away from the conflict. But British officials say the task force has the right to defend itself against any potentially hostile vessel.

 


 

 

4 May 1982 HMS Sheffield lost

 

HMS Sheffield

 

British destroyer HMS Sheffield is hit by an Exocet missile that kills 20 crew and starts a fire in the control room, which in turn leads to the ship being abandoned. A British Sea Harrier jump jet aircraft is lost over Goose Green, the first to be shot down during the conflict.

 

 


 

 

14-15 May 1982 Pebble Island raid

 

Pebble Island

 

SAS soldiers attack Argentine forces on Pebble Island, a remote spot on the north coast of West Falkland, leaving six Argentine ground-attack Pucara aircraft - viewed as a major threat to a British landing - burning on the airstrip.

 

 


 

 

19 May 1982 SAS troops killed

 

Sea King helicopter

 

A Sea King helicopter transferring SAS soldiers between ships ditches into the sea, killing 22 men.

 

 


 

 

21 May 1982 British land at San Carlos

 

UK Defence Minister John Nott announces Britain's advance on the Falkland Islands [video]

 

British landings begin at San Carlos on East Falkland, with 3,000 troops and 1,000 tons of supplies brought ashore in order to establish a beachhead. But the British frigate HMS Ardent is sunk by Argentine aircraft, leaving 22 dead. HMS Argonaut and HMS Antrim are hit by Argentine bombs that fail to explode; two die. Fifteen Argentine aircraft are shot down.

 

 


 

 

23 May 1982 HMS Antelope hit

 

Argentine 'Air Macchi' fighter-bombers used during the Falklands War

 

British frigate HMS Antelope is hit by an Argentine bomb which fails to explode. One crewman dies. Ten Argentine aircraft are shot down.

 

 


 

 

24 May 1982 Antelope abandoned

 

HMS Antelope in flames

 

A bomb disposal officer is killed after the bomb he is attempting to defuse explodes aboard HMS Antelope. The badly damaged frigate is abandoned and later sinks. Landing craft RFA Sir Galahad and RFA Sir Lancelot are hit by Argentine bombs which also fail to detonate. Seven Argentine aircraft are shot down.

 

 


 

 

25 May 1982 Two more ships lost

 

An Exocet missile used by the Argentines in 1982

 

British destroyer HMS Coventry sinks after being attacked by Argentine aircraft, with the loss of 19 crew. The British Merchant Navy container ship Atlantic Conveyor is set ablaze after being hit by Exocet missiles. It is abandoned with the loss of 12 crew and three vital Chinook transport helicopters.

 

Page 2          http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-17444526

2 years ago

26 May 1982 British head for Goose Green

British soldier checks the area with binoculars

 

The 2nd Battalion of the Parachute Regiment (2 Para) is ordered to set out for the neighbouring settlements of Goose Green and Darwin, which are held by Argentine forces.

 


27 May 1982 Fury over BBC report

A microphone used for radio broadcasting

 

British forces are furious when the BBC World Service broadcasts that the men of 2 Para are advancing on Goose Green and Darwin, but the Argentine commander is convinced the report is deliberate misinformation.

 


28-29 May 1982

Battle of Goose Green

Goose Green littered with Argentinian helmets, ammunition and water bottles

 

2 Para attack Goose Green and Darwin. After fierce fighting, the Argentines surrender. Seventeen British servicemen die during the battle, including commanding officer Lt Col "H" Jones. Although initial reports speak of 250 Argentine dead, the figure is now thought to have been much lower - possibly below 50. British troops, who are vastly outnumbered, take more than 1,000 prisoners of war.

 


31 May 1982 Advance toward Stanley

British soldiers advancing on Falkland

 

British forces advance towards the capital Port Stanley from San Carlos, taking the Argentine positions on Mount Kent and Mount Challenger.

 


 

8 June 1982 Bluff Cove disaster

RFA Sir Galahad ablaze at Bluff Cove [video]

 

Landing craft RFA Sir Galahad and RFA Sir Tristram, with units of the Welsh Guards on board, are bombed by Argentine aircraft at Bluff Cove while attempting to reinforce British positions at Fitzroy. More than 50 men die.

 


11-12 June 1982 Peaks captured

British troops marching [video]

 

British troops take the key objectives of Mount Longdon, Two Sisters and Mount Harriet from the Argentines after bloody hand-to-hand fighting. British destroyer HMS Glamorgan is badly damaged by a shore-launched Exocet missile. Three Falklands civilians, all women, are killed during a British naval bombardment of Stanley.


13-14 June 1982 Argentine positions overrun

British soldiers position artillery [video]

 

British forces take Argentine positions on mountains overlooking Port Stanley on Mount Tumbledown, Wireless Ridge and Mount William amid further fierce fighting.

 


 

14 June 1982 British forces enter Stanley

British soldiers enter Port Stanley in June 1982 [video]

 

White flags are seen flying over Port Stanley, and by noon British forces have advanced to the outskirts of the Falklands capital. General Mario Menendez surrenders to Major General Jeremy Moore, and 9,800 Argentine troops put down their arms. British troops march into Stanley.

 


16-17 June 1982 President Galtieri resigns

War memorial

 

UK Defence Minister Peter Blaker announces that the official count of British war dead is 255, with approximately 300 wounded. The following day, Argentine President Leopoldo Galtieri resigns as leader of the country's military junta.

 

Page 3      http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-17444526

 

Falklands 30: Brian Hanrahan's memories ( Video )
2 years ago

1 April 2012 Last updated at 00:23

 

Falklands 30: Brian Hanrahan's memories

 

On 2 April 1982, Argentine forces invaded a remote British territory in the South Atlantic, which led to a brief but bitter war which saw more than 900 people killed.

 

One of the most recognisable and memorable BBC voices during the conflict was that of the late Brian Hanrahan. He travelled 8,000 miles with the British military task force to the South Atlantic.

 

Here - with the help of BBC News reports from the time, and Brian's personal thoughts recorded after the fighting - we take a look back at events 30 years ago.

 

Includes BBC News and BBC Radio 2 archive audio. Music by Yazoo, ABC, Dire Straits and Shalamar.

Images from BBC, PA, Getty Images, AP and courtesy Imperial War Museum North.

Slideshow production by Paul Kerley. Publication date 1 April 2012.

Related:

Brian Hanrahan - obituary

Imperial War Museum North

 

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-17542097

2 years ago

Cameron needs to tell that Argentinian Pelosi doppelganger to go pound sand.

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