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Afghan Koran 'burning': US apologises
3 years ago

Afghan Koran 'burning': US apologises

Half-burnt Koran held during protest outside Bagram Airbase
A violent protest sprang up outside Bagram base as news of the incident spread
US Defence Secretary Leon Panetta has apologised to the Afghan people for an incident in which copies of the Koran were reportedly burned.

Mr Panetta said the US military respected the religious practices of the Afghan people "without exception".

 

The Nato commander in Afghanistan, US Gen John R Allen, has already announced an inquiry into the incident.

 

Reports suggest the US had confiscated materials that they suspected Taliban prisoners were using to send messages.

 

News of the incident has triggered angry protests outside the US base at Bagram, north of Kabul.

 

One person was wounded and five were detained when Nato forces used rubber bullets to disperse the crowd.

 

"This morning Gen Allen notified me of the deeply unfortunate incident involving the inappropriate treatment of religious materials, including the Koran, at Bagram Airbase," a statement from Mr Panetta said.

 

"He and I apologise to the Afghan people and disapprove of such conduct in the strongest possible terms.

 

"These actions do not represent the views of the United States military.

 

We honour and respect the religious practices of the Afghan people, without exception."

 

Mr Panetta said he supported Gen Allen's decision to launch an inquiry.

 

"I will carefully review the final results of the investigation to ensure that we take all steps necessary and appropriate so that this never happens again," he said.

 

Afghan President Hamid Karzai condemned the reports that the Koran had been burnt. The Taliban said the incident would hurt the feelings "of one billion Muslims around the world".

 

Reports said the Korans had been found in piles of rubbish that Nato had transported in a lorry on Monday night to a pit on the base where waste is burned.

 

Afghans working at the pit are believed to have seen the religious books and stopped the disposal process.

 

Two senior Afghan officials told the BBC that religious materials held by Taliban prisoners had been confiscated because US officials suspected they were using them to send secret messages to each other.

 

'Not intentional'

 

Gen Allen said that any "improper disposal" of religious materials had been inadvertent.

 

"We are thoroughly investigating the incident and we are taking steps to ensure this does not ever happen again. I assure you… I promise you… this was not intentional in any way," he said.

 

"We are thoroughly investigating the incident and we are taking steps to ensure this does not ever happen again. I assure you… I promise you… this was not intentional in any way," he said.

 

Witnesses said that about 2,000 protesters gathered outside the base as word of the incident spread.

 

"We Afghans don't want these Christians and infidels, they are the enemy of our soil, our honour and our Koran," said one protester, Haji Shirin.

 

"I urge all Muslims to sacrifice themselves in order to pull out these troops from this soil."

 

Bagram includes a prison for Afghans detained by Nato forces.

 

Some Afghans claim inmates there have been ill-treated and Mr Karzai has demanded that those detained be transferred to Afghan security.

 

Nato and Afghan security forces have been put on alert over fears of a repeat of violence that followed news of a Koran being burnt last year by a hardline preacher in Florida. At least 24 people in Afghanistan died in angry protests triggered by that incident.

 

 

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-17116595

Afghan Koran burning at Bagram sparks fresh protests
3 years ago

Afghan Koran burning at Bagram sparks fresh protests
Breaking news

Anti-American demonstrations are under way in the Afghan cities of Kabul and Jalalabad over the burning of copies of the Koran by Nato troops.

 

Shots have been fired in Kabul, where protesters have gathered outside a US military base.

 

On Tuesday, the US commander in Afghanistan, Gen John Allen, apologised after soldiers put copies of the Koran in an incinerator at Bagram airbase.

 

The charred remains of the books were found by local labourers.

 

One person was wounded and five detained after troops at Bagram fired rubber bullets at protests on Tuesday.

 

Reports suggest the Korans were seized because soldiers at the base believed Taliban prisoners were using the books to send messages.

 

US Defence Secretary Leon Panetta said he and Gen Allen apologised to the Afghan people "and disapprove of such conduct in the strongest possible terms".

 

Hundreds of people have gathered outside a military base on the main road linking Kabul and Jalalabad to the east, closing the main trade route, a Kabul police spokesman told the Associated Press.

 

The US embassy in Kabul has tweeted that it is on lockdown and all travel is suspended.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-17123464

3 years ago

Afghan Koran burning at Bagram sparks fresh protests

Afghan protester (21 Feb)
Demonstrations began on Tuesday after reports of the Koran being burned first spread

Related Stories

Anti-American demonstrations are under way in the Afghan cities of Kabul and Jalalabad over the burning of copies of the Koran at a US airbase.

 

At least three people have been injured in Kabul, while shots were fired outside a US military base.

 

On Tuesday, the US commander in Afghanistan, Gen John Allen, apologised after copies of the Koran were put into an incinerator at Bagram airbase.

 

The charred remains of the books were found by local labourers.

 

Two senior Afghan officials told the BBC that religious materials held by Taliban prisoners had been confiscated because US officials suspected they were using them to send secret messages to each other.

 

Pro-Taliban slogans

 

Protesters in Kabul shouted, "Death to America!" and threw stones at the main US base in the city.

 

Witnesses at the protests in Kabul said security guards were firing into the air. There are also reports of people chanting pro-Taliban slogans.

General John R Allen: 'When we learned of these actions, we immediately intervened and stopped them.'

 

Demonstrators blocked the road linking Kabul with the eastern city of Jalalabad.

 

A riot police unit was attacked by protesters in Kabul and fled, the AFP news agency reported.

 

One protester, 18-year-old Ajmal, told Reuters: "When the Americans insult us to this degree, we will join the insurgents."

The US embassy in Kabul has tweeted that it is on lockdown and all travel is suspended.

 

US Defence Secretary Leon Panetta said he and Gen Allen apologised to the Afghan people "and disapprove of such conduct in the strongest possible terms".

 

After previous incidents, many Afghans find it hard to understand how US forces could have allowed the Koran to have been burned, our correspondent says.

 

Last year, at least 24 people died in protests after a hardline US pastor burned a Koran in Florida.

 

On Tuesday, one person was wounded and five detained after troops at Bagram, 60km (40 miles) north of Kabul, fired rubber bullets at protests.

 

Bagram includes a prison for Afghans detained by Nato forces.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-17123464

3 years ago

The inmates were using these "holy texts" to send messages to each other so they were then defiled anyway. How come we are so "sensitive" to feelings of the members of this cult while our alleged "POTUS" uses his HHS to trash the religious teachings of US citizens in violation to the Constitution he supposedly took a "vow" to uphold?

3 years ago

At this point why don't we just bring our troops home and let the Afghani and the Taliban (and al Quaeda) go at each other; continue to abuse women and children and all their other inhuman treatment of their own countrymen.  

 

Then it was pointed out to me to question whether these were truly Afghani people and could possible be Pakistani.  I suspect that it is probably both working together, and the Afghani are being stirred up by the Pakistani.

3 years ago

22 February 2012 Last updated at 15:39

 

Six dead in Afghanistan Koran burning protests

Second day of protests spread over Afghan Koran burning

 

At least six people have been killed and dozens injured in Afghanistan after protests spread over the burning of copies of the Koran at a US airbase. One person was killed in Kabul, one in the eastern city of Jalalabad and at least four in Parwan province.

 

US officials apologised on Tuesday after Korans were "inadvertently" put in an incinerator at Bagram airbase. Officials at Bagram reportedly believed Taliban prisoners were using the books to pass messages to each other.

 

The charred remains of the volumes were found by local labourers.

Pro-Taliban slogans. Protesters in Kabul shouted, "Death to America!" and threw stones at Camp Phoenix, the main US base in the city.

 

Riot police used water cannon to disperse protesters, some of whom were blocking the road leading to Jalalabad, one of the main trade routes into the capital. Witnesses said security guards were firing into the air. There were also reports of people chanting pro-Taliban slogans. One protester in Kabul was killed and 10 wounded.

 

Four further deaths were confirmed in the Shinwari district of Parwan province, north of Kabul. There were also peaceful protests in the eastern province of Kunar.

 

In Jalalabad, protesters burned an effigy of US President Barack Obama, and BBC Afghan reporter Babrak Miakhel said oil tankers had been set on fire. A doctor told the BBC one person had been killed and 10 injured.

 

One protester in Kabul, 18-year-old Ajmal, told Reuters: "When the Americans insult us to this degree, we will join the insurgents." The US embassy in Kabul is on lockdown and all travel is suspended. The Taliban called on Afghan police and soldiers to redeem themselves by turning their guns away from protesters and towards Nato-led troops. The Afghan parliament held an emergency debate.

 

In a statement, MPs condemned what had happened, called for punishment of those responsible and asked the Afghan government to send its own delegation to Bagram to establish exactly what happened and why. "Everyone is emotional," Kabul resident Mohammad Naseer Malikzai told the BBC. "I am hurting and disappointed.

 

"I created a Facebook group where I was disputing with a lot of people. The American apology is useless." Another Kabul resident, Farhad Raza, said abusing Islam would prolong the war in Afghanistan. "These kind of actions [abusing Islam] create a gap between Afghans and Nato forces, and make people hate Nato forces, which will make this war longer than it is now," he told the BBC.

 

Isaf investigation

 

US Defence Secretary Leon Panetta said he and the top commander of US and Nato forces in Afghanistan, Gen John Allen, had apologised to the Afghan people "and disapprove of such conduct in the strongest possible terms". After previous incidents, many Afghans find it hard to understand how US forces could have allowed the Koran to have been burned, says the BBC's Andrew North, in Kabul.

 

Afghanistan is a very religious country, he adds, but also one where many people are illiterate and susceptible to attempts to whip up anger.

Muslims consider the Koran the literal word of God and treat each book with deep reverence. The Nato-led Isaf force is now investigating the incident, a spokesman told the BBC.

 

"It was the local workers who discovered the nature of the material and therefore stopped worse things from happening," said Brig Gen Carsten Jacobson. "But it was a mistake and that's what we're investigating at the moment: how did this come to be, what orders were given? "But at the end of the day we have to stand to the fact a mistake was made and the commander apologised." Last year, at least 24 people died in protests across Afghanistan after a hardline US pastor burned a Koran in Florida.

On Tuesday, one person was wounded and five detained after troops at Bagram, 60km (40 miles) north of Kabul, fired rubber bullets at protesters.

Bagram includes a prison for Afghans detained by Nato forces.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-17123464

3 years ago

JohnC ~ green star coming your way!!

3 years ago

Diane O: Thanks!! This is a a huge overreaction as usual!!!

3 years ago

Indeed, John!!

Barack Obama apology to Afghanistan over Koran burning
3 years ago

Barack Obama apology to Afghanistan over Koran burning

Afghan police and plain-clothed security officials fire shots into a crowd of about 500 protesters in Kabul

 

President Barack Obama has apologised to the Afghan people for the burning of Korans by American troops at a US base.

 

In a letter to President Hamid Karzai, Mr Obama expressed his "deep regret" and said the incident earlier this week was a genuine mistake.

Demonstrations against the desecration have continued for a third day across northern and eastern Afghanistan.

 

Two US soldiers and two Afghans were killed in an attack on a military base. Elsewhere there were four other deaths.

 

On Wednesday, another seven people were killed and dozens injured in protests.

 

Mr Obama's letter, delivered by the US ambassador to Afghanistan, assured the Afghan president that US authorities would question all those responsible.

 

"I convey my deep sympathies and ask you and the people to accept my deep apologies," the letter said.

 

"The error was inadvertent; I assure you that we will take the appropriate steps to avoid any recurrence, to include holding accountable those responsible," it continued.

 

President Karzai told members of the Afghan parliament that a US officer was responsible for the burning.

 

But he said it was done out of "ignorance".

 

In addition to those killed, many people have been injured in the protests, some of them critically, while armed men on Thursday also attacked at least two military installations.

 

Crowds shouting "death to Obama" have been throwing stones and setting fire to the US flag.

 

Meanwhile the Taliban has called on Afghans to kill and beat all invading forces in revenge for "insulting" the Koran.

 

In a statement a Taliban spokesman said Afghans should "not stop at protesting" but instead target military bases and personnel to "teach them a lesson that they will never again dare to insult the Holy Koran".

 

'Death to America'

 

The BBC's Andrew North, in the Afghan capital, says many officials sympathise with the outrage the US has provoked across the country.

 

He says Friday prayers may spark more tensions, depending on the tone set by religious leaders.

 

Protests mapThe protests have become more widespread

Police, local officials and tribal elders have told the BBC there have been major protests in a number of areas across the country, involving many hundreds of people.

  • In Khogyani in Nangarhar province, a man wearing an Afghan army uniform killed two US soldiers. Two protesters were also killed and seven injured as Nato forces opened fire when armed men attacked the US/Afghan base
  • In Uruzgan province, two people were killed and at least eight others wounded, three of them police, in clashes between protesters and Afghan security forces, local officials told the BBC's  Bilal Sarwary
  • In northern Baghlan province, one civilian was killed and two others injured, while two police were also hurt
  • One person was killed in Laghman province, east of Kabul, where local police said several hundred people were chanting "Death to America"
  • More than 3,000 people gathered in Mehtar Lam, the capital of Laghman province, with some burning an effigy of President Obama
  • Fights broke out in Kabul as hundreds of protesters were stopped from entering the centre
  • In Asadabad, some 1,500 demonstrators were said to be burning US flags and tyres and shouting anti-American slogans.
  • A French military base to the east of Kabul was attacked

Muslims consider the Koran the literal word of God and treat each book with deep reverence.

 

Last year, at least 24 people died in protests across Afghanistan after a hardline US pastor burned a Koran in Florida

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-17144726

Afghanistan Koran protests claim more lives
3 years ago

24 February 2012 Last updated at 17:57


Afghanistan Koran protests claim more lives

BBC's Orla Guerin: "Apologies from US officials are not cooling anger on the streets of Afghanistan"  [Video]

 

 

Thousands of enraged Afghans have taken to the streets for a fourth day, after US soldiers inadvertently set fire to copies of the Koran.

 

In the deadliest day of unrest so far, at least 12 people died across the country, as mobs charged at US bases and diplomatic missions.

 

More than 20 people have been killed since the unrest began, including two US soldiers who died on Thursday.

 

President Barack Obama has apologised for the Koran-burning incident.

In a letter to his Afghan counterpart Hamid Karzai, Mr Obama said the books had been "unintentionally mishandled".

 

US personnel apparently put the books into a rubbish incinerator at Bagram air base, near Kabul.

 

Spreading unrest

 

Most of the deaths reported on Friday were in western Herat province, which had seen little unrest previously.

 

A group of demonstrators tried to attack the US consulate in Herat city, burning police vehicles and leaving several officers injured.

 

Hospital officials confirmed four people had been killed, but it was unclear how they had died.

 

Another four people died near the town of Adraskan, 70km (45 miles) south of Herat city.

 

Elsewhere in Afghanistan:

  • About 1,000 people took to the streets of Baghlan, north of Kabul, and one person was reported killed
  • In Kabul, hundreds of people poured on to the streets to take part in several rallies after Friday prayers; police said a protester was shot and killed accidentally when other demonstrators opened fire
  • Two demonstrators were killed in Khost province
  • Several thousand people protesting in Nangarhar blocked a main road

Reports say isolated protests have also broken out in Pakistan, where there is a tradition of angry anti-US rallies.

'Major error'

Earlier on Friday, Nato commander in Afghanistan, Gen John Allen, appealed for calm.

Nato Gen John Allen: "American soldiers do not stand for this"

[VIDEO]

 

"I call on everyone throughout the country - Isaf members and Afghans - to exercise patience and restraint as we continue to gather the facts," Gen Allen said in a statement.

 

"Working together with the Afghan leadership is the only way for us to correct this major error and ensure that it never happens again."

 

Muslims consider the Koran the literal word of God and treat each book with deep reverence.

 

And the various apologies from Nato and the US have not cooled the anger on the streets, says the BBC's Orla Guerin in Kabul.

 

On Thursday the Taliban had called on Afghans to attack "invading forces" in revenge for "insulting" the Koran.

 

Last year, at least 24 people died in protests across Afghanistan after a hard-line US pastor burned a Koran in Florida.

 

Page 1    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-17152705

3 years ago

Map of Afghan protests

 

Analysis

After the anger expressed in the Afghan parliament on Wednesday, where mullahs were prompted to encourage demonstrations, it was certain that protests would last until Friday.

 

The fact that crowds targeted police stations shows how frustrations were driven not just by Koran burnings but also by issues such as such insecurity, poor governance, corruption and unemployment.

 

Afghan forces, particularly the intelligence agency, clearly need to improve their performance as they failed for a second day to identify groups and individuals wanting to take advantage of the chaos.

 

Some protesters in Kabul were armed and managed to open fire on the police.

 

It seems likely that protests will fizzle out on Saturday, unless there is appetite in the establishment for more anger to be vented.

 

But it will take the US a long time to repair its image, and this may prove a costly mistake in the campaign to win hearts and minds.

 

Page 2      http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-17152705

3 years ago

Many (I don't claim all just a significant number) Muslims don't need a reason to riot.  Agreed, John. The Qur'ans were already defiled when they were burned.  Obama has no respect for religious freedom in this country unless you're Muslim. In which case it's defended or incidents played down such as at Ft. Hood where it is now being called 'work place violence'.   What you said bears repeating, "our alleged "POTUS" uses his HHS to trash the religious teachings of US citizens in violation to the Constitution he supposedly took a "vow" to uphold?"                                                 

 

Why should we be bending over backwards to apologize to these people?   Where is the tolerance and religious freedom for Christians in Muslim countries?  ...oh, that's right, there isn't any, is there?!   Pastor Youcef Nadarkhani is to be executed in Iran for converting to Christianity.

http://www.examiner.com/baptist-in-charlotte/christian-pastor-youcef-nadarkhani-sentenced-to-die-iran

 

Video: CAIR Rep Says Quran Burnings Show Religious Insensitivity

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GpnuDK4OZaY 

3 years ago

I fully understand and accept that the Qur'an is a holy book and sacred to the Muslims; the Bible is a sacred book and sacred to Christians as well.  So explain why the Obama Administration does not protest the Holy Bibles that are being burned in Pakistan, Somalia, and other countries of the World.  

 

I also feel that the whole story should have been released before all the media hype, but then we are dealing with the media and what more is there to say.

3 years ago

2 days ago

At this point why don't we just bring our troops home and let the Afghani and the Taliban (and al Quaeda) go at each other; continue to abuse women and children and all their other inhuman treatment of their own countrymen.

 

A most excellent idea!  If they wish to live like animals, let them.  In the future, if they choose to aid terrorists, well, I would say bomb them into the stone age without putting troops on the ground, but they already live in the stone age.  Was there any such thing as a 'dust age'?

3 years ago

David, you sound like my husband!      "bomb them into the stone age"  He has said similar on many an occasion.  

3 years ago

It would be nice if there were a less harsh way of dealing with them, but since our first national encounter with Islam in form of the Barbary States, it has been proven repetitively that diplomacy will not work since they see it as weakness and inability to defend ourselves, not as a preference for avoiding bloodshed.  This, in turn, demonstrates a lower value on human life which is foreign to most of us.  In the end, we cannot allow the problem to be multiplied because of our (in my reckoning sane) aversion to unnecessary bloodshed.

3 years ago

David and Sandy, my daughter would add her voice to this.  Sandy, tell your husband that it must stem from having been in the Middle East in the military.  My daughter feels much the same; why waste any more of your men and women's lives.  They have no respect for human life.  Sounds inhumane, but then what are they doing that is humane?  So this brings me back to the idea that if we can't bring ourselves to "bomb them into the stone age", we at least can let them continue their method of killing each other off.  If there was just a way to keep them busy with each other and to leave the rest of the world alone, but those days are behind us I am afraid.

Nato pulls out of Afghan ministries after Kabul attack
3 years ago

25 February 2012 Last updated at 16:10 Nato pulls out of Afghan ministries after Kabul attack

Scene close to Afghan interior ministry, 25 Feb 2012
Any attacker would have had the highest clearance
Nato has withdrawn all its personnel from Afghan ministries after two senior officers were shot dead in the interior ministry building in Kabul.

 

Nato said an "individual" had turned his gun on the officers, believed to be an American colonel and major, and had not yet been identified or caught.

 

Nato commander Gen John Allen condemned the attack as "cowardly".

 

The shootings come amid five days of deadly protests over the burning of copies of the Koran by US soldiers.

 

Taliban statement

 

The interior ministry was put in lock-down after the shootings, officials said.

The BBC's Orla Guerin in Kabul says eight shots were reported inside the building, which should be one of the safest in the capital, and that any Afghan who carried out the attack would have had the highest clearance.

Local media reports said the gunman was an Afghan policeman but this has not been confirmed.

The reports suggest the incident followed a "verbal clash".

 

Gen Allen said he condemned the attack, adding: "We will pursue all leads to find the person responsible. The perpetrator of this attack is a coward whose actions will not go unanswered."

 

He said: "For obvious force protection reasons, I have also taken immediate measures to recall all other Isaf personnel working in ministries in and around Kabul."

 

But Gen Allen added: "We are committed to our partnership with the government of Afghanistan to reach our common goal of a peaceful, stable and secure Afghanistan in the near future."

 

The UK Foreign Office confirmed it had "withdrawn civilian mentors and advisers from institutions in the city as a temporary measure".

 

Isaf spokesman Brig Gen Carsten Jacobson said that Nato could not yet reveal the identity of those killed.

 

He also said: "We cannot confirm where the killer came from, what his nationality was, whether he was in uniform or not, all these questions are not known."

BBC's Orla Guerin: "People demand tough action against US troops"

 

Early reports suggest the two officers were shot in the ministry's command and control centre.

 

The BBC's Bilal Sarwary in Kabul says this is where representatives of 34 provinces meet to plan security.

 

He quotes sources as saying that Interior Minister Bismullah Khan was having a meeting with senior Western officials elsewhere in the building when the shooting took place.

 

The Taliban said in a website statement that it carried out the attack in response to the Koran burnings.

 

But Gen Jacobson would not be drawn on any link to the protests.

 

He said: "We have seen an emotional week, we have seen a busy week - but it would be too early to say this incident was linked."

 

He added: "It is very regretful to see the loss of life again on this day, and that includes the loss of life that we have seen around demonstrations."

 

Page 1    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-17165410

Nato pulls out of Afghan ministries after Kabul attack
3 years ago

Obama apology

 

Angry protests over the burning of the Korans continued on Saturday, with a UN compound in the city of Kunduz set alight.

 

Protests in Kunduz, 25 Feb
Angry protests in Kunduz on Saturday over the Koran burnings

Four people were killed and dozens injured in clashes in the city, according to local doctors. Three more people were killed in the southern province of Logar.

 

The governor's house in Laghman province also came under attack on Saturday and there were demonstrations in Paktia, Nangarhar and Sari Pul provinces.

 

Nearly 30 people have died since the protests began on Tuesday.

 

US personnel apparently inadvertently put the books into a rubbish incinerator at Bagram air base, near Kabul.

 

US President Barack Obama has apologised for the Koran-burning incident.

 

In a letter to his Afghan counterpart Hamid Karzai, Mr Obama said the books had been "unintentionally mishandled".

 

Muslims consider the Koran the literal word of God and treat each book with deep reverence.

 

Page 2         http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-17165410

3 years ago

The day muslims apologize for killing christians and burning of the bible is the day ill start caring for them and there koran but dont hold your breath on that .

3 years ago

From a video posted at another group.  Well said, Kira Davis:

 

My Apology to President Karzai on Behalf of Americans

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZYEctbGSkkw&feature=youtu.be

 

 

3 years ago

After watching the video of this apology all i can say is I Love You and BRAVO to you Kira.

3 years ago

So, our leader is apologizing, yet again, to another country, for what he deems as our sins! 

 

Why are these people rioting?  If I was the leader of that country I'd just give everyone a pipe and open up the poppy fields! 

3 years ago

Sandy, thank you for the link.  Has anyone heard Obama make any explanation about the reason for why these 4 books were burned?  I have yet to hear that from the White House or directly from him.  It does shed a great deal of light on the situation and based on this, was perfectly justified.  Have any of you heard him express concern for the U.S. soldiers that have been killed, more than likely the rioters were further inflamed by his apology so he would then have some responsibility for these latest deaths?

 

It is rather sad when the pages of a book (whether it be the Holy Bible or the Koran) become more important than human life; I know that the Holy Bible has never been expected to be greater than human life.  

 

These terrorist prisoners had already defiled their Koran, so why then is there the outcry.

 

There is only one apology that I would like to hear from Obama, and that is a apology to the American people for his poor performance, anti-American policies, disrespect for the Constitution, and disrespect for our Military.

3 years ago

I have a thought.  Since our Moslem neighbors have a much higher regard for their book than for human life, perhaps we should have preserved the books corrupted with proscribed messages and dispensed with the offending inmates?  After all, that seems to be more congruent with their preferences.

3 years ago

Dave, well put and seems appropriate to me.

3 years ago

David, that makes perfect sense.  Great idea!  Next time, and no doubt there will be a next time all too soon, we ought to do that! 

3 years ago

David, so sorry.  My fella is David, also and goes by either Dave or David and so I got confused.  Please accept my apology for referencing you as Dave.

3 years ago

Send a Green Star to Tara Jane Hampton

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3 years ago

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3 years ago

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1 hrs ago

David, so sorry.  My fella is David, also and goes by either Dave or David and so I got confused.  Please accept my apology for referencing you as Dave.

 

I alternately answer to both as well.  In fact, I can deal with being called most things other than late to dinner!  

3 years ago

There was another attack on US troops again today by an Afghan "ally" and seven were wounded. Guess the apologies aren't working too well. Now it wouldn't surprise me one bit if 9/11 (or a similar attack now) occurred on Obumbler's watch that he would then attack the Vatican or the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury and apologize to all muslims for anyone thinking islam was involved!

3 years ago

27 February 2012 Last updated at 05:40

 


Afghan airport hit by Taliban 'revenge' car bombing

Map locator

A Taliban suicide car bomber has killed at least nine people and wounded 10 others in an attack at Jalalabad airport in eastern Afghanistan.

 

The insurgents said the bombing was in revenge for a Koran-burning incident at a US air base a week ago.

 

The burning, which the US says was unintentional, has sparked violent protests across the country.

 

Nato said it had no reports of international forces being among the casualties in Jalalabad.

 

The airport serves both civilian and international military aircraft. Witnesses reported seeing at least four destroyed cars at the gates.

 

Taliban spokesman Zabiullah Mujahid said in an email to media: "This attack is revenge against those soldiers who burned our Koran.''

 

President Hamid Karzai has appealed for calm amid anger at the incident at Bagram air base near Kabul.

 

In his televised address on Sunday, Mr Karzai "condemned with the strongest words" the treatment of the Korans but added: "Now that we have shown our feelings it is time to be calm and peaceful."

 

Manhunt

Protest in Jalalabad province over Koran burning
Protests have swept Afghanistan since the Koran burning incident

More than 30 people have been killed in the past five days, and further violence broke out on Sunday.

 

A grenade was thrown into a Nato base in northern Kunduz province during a protest, injuring several Nato personnel.

 

Also on Sunday, some 4,000 people took to the streets in Aybal, in northern Samangan province, attacking a police station and a US base.

 

Meanwhile, Afghan authorities are still hunting a 25-year-old Afghan policeman believed to have shot dead two senior Nato officers at the interior ministry in Kabul on Saturday.

 

Afghan officials named the suspect as a police intelligence officer, Abdul Saboor, from Parwan province.

 

The dead Nato officers are believed to have been American officers.

 

On Sunday, France and Germany followed the US and Britain in withdrawing civilian staff from Afghan government institutions in the wake of the killings.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-17175568

 



This post was modified from its original form on 26 Feb, 22:05
3 years ago

Thank you David.

 

John C, that is way to close to a reality.  That is exactly what will happen I am afraid.  The Iranians are planning a strike on Israel so he pressures Israel to hold off and not to stir things up; then when Iran follows through he will apologize to them for not getting Israel to sit still and take it.

3 years ago

Heard two news reports today but not sure how accurate they are yet. One was the senior commander in Afghanistan will punish those who accidentally burned the alleged "holy books" even though the same "holy books" have been found discarded in trash, in creeks, and other places in Pakistan (by adherents of the alleged "religion of peace" of course). The second was more a comment on a talk show where our alleged State Department has been quietly giving US owned islands in the Alaska area and in other areas of the Pacific to Russia and other "nations" without congressional approval and even some with US citizens in residence. Not surprising about this farce based on past actions by our Fearful "Leader" and his "diplomatic corpse".

Afghan Taliban set off car bomb at Jalalabad airport
3 years ago

27 February 2012 Last updated at 15:08


Afghan Taliban set off car bomb at Jalalabad airport

The BBC's Orla Guerin: "The blast he detonated was powerful enough to destroy four cars"

A Taliban suicide car bomber has killed at least nine people and wounded 10 others in an attack at Jalalabad airport in eastern Afghanistan.

The insurgents said the bombing was in revenge for a Koran-burning incident at a US air base near Kabul a week ago.

 

The burning, which the US says was unintentional, has sparked violent protests across the country.

 

Nato said it had no reports of international forces being among the casualties in Jalalabad.

 

The airport serves both civilian and international military aircraft. Witnesses reported seeing at least four destroyed cars at the gates.

 

'Late reaction'

 

Taliban spokesman Zabiullah Mujahid said in an email to media: "This attack is revenge against those soldiers who burned our Koran.''

 

President Hamid Karzai has appealed for calm amid anger at the incident at Bagram air base near Kabul.

 

In his televised address on Sunday, Mr Karzai "condemned with the strongest words" the treatment of the Korans but added: "Now that we have shown our feelings it is time to be calm and peaceful."

 

But the BBC's Bilal Sarwary in Kabul says Western officials have complained that the Afghan leadership, including Mr Karzai, did not do enough to stop the violence.

 

Several Western diplomats said they would have preferred the Afghan president deliver a video address swiftly and ask for an immediate end to violence by demonstrators. But they say his late reaction allowed violent protests to continue, according to our correspondent.

 

Manhunt

 

More than 30 people have been killed in the past five days, and there was further violence on Sunday.

 

Muslims consider the Koran the literal word of God and treat each book with deep reverence.

 

Various apologies from Nato and the US over the last week failed to cool the anger on the streets.

 

Meanwhile, Afghan authorities are still hunting a 25-year-old Afghan policeman believed to have shot dead two senior Nato officers at the interior ministry in Kabul on Saturday.

 

Afghan officials named the suspect as a police intelligence officer, Abdul Saboor, from Parwan province.

 

The dead Nato officers are believed to have been Americans.

 

The US, Britain, France and Germany have now withdrawn civilian staff from Afghan institutions. It is unclear how long the withdrawal will last.

 

Timeline: Koran anger

  • 20 Feb: Korans found by labourers on Bagram air base amid piles of rubbish reportedly sent to be burned
  • 21 Feb: Nato and the US apologise and officials say it was not intentional, but anger escalates
  • 22 Feb: Six killed in protests around the country
  • 23 Feb: US President Barack Obama apologises; two US soldiers are among eight people killed in violent protests
  • 24 Feb: Deadliest single day of protests as 12 people are killed
  • 25 Feb: Two Nato officers shot dead by a policeman in the interior ministry; US withdraws staff from ministries
  • 26 Feb: Other Nato nations withdraw staff from ministries
  • 27 Feb: Nine killed in a car bomb attack at Jalalabad airport
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-17175568
Lt Col Daniel Davis: 'US army does not tell truth
3 years ago

27 February 2012 Last updated at 16:59


Lt Col Daniel Davis: 'US army does not tell truth'

Video BBC Website      http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-17183739

 

As Afghan fury over Koran burning by US forces continues, a serving US army officer has said publicly that the US top brass are not telling the truth.

 

Lt Col Daniel Davis, said there was an "absence of success on virtually every level", despite political reassurances led by Washington that all was well.

 

He was speaking after a suicide car bomb killed nine people at a military airport in eastern Afghanistan.

 

Thirty people have been killed in six days of violent anti-US demonstrations.

 

Nato has said it is investigating the incident and is taking steps to ensure something like this does not ever happen again.

 

 

Nato soldiers shot dead in Afghanistan amid Koran anger
3 years ago


Nato soldiers shot dead in Afghanistan amid Koran anger
Afghan protesters gesture towards police in Kabul on 24 February
Protests erupted in Afghanistan last week over the desecration of the Koran by US soldiers

Nato says two of its soldiers have been shot dead on a base in Afghanistan, the latest of several attacks after the burning of the Koran by US soldiers.

 

It said a man in an Afghan army uniform and another in civilian clothes carried out the shooting in Kandahar province.

 

But officials in Zheray district say only one man - who was on the base to teach Afghans literacy - opened fire.

 

Hours earlier Nato chief Gen John Allen told the BBC the recent violence was a "setback" that would be overcome.

 

An Afghan army spokesman in Kandahar said two gunmen initially opened fire on an Afghan sentry manning a security tower before climbing it and shooting at Nato troops. He said both attackers were killed.

 

But a district chief in the city's Zhari district said the killing was carried out by an Afghan civilian who taught Afghan soldiers and lived on the base.

 

Nato has not released the nationalities of those who died.

 

'Reverence'

 

The BBC's Bilal Sarwary in Kabul says it is unclear how a teacher was allowed to stay on the base and have access to a weapon.

 

Six Nato personnel are amongst more than 30 people killed since protests erupted last week over the burning of the Koran by US troops on a military base.

 

Troubled flared after US personnel apparently inadvertently put copies of the Koran, which reports say had been confiscated from terror suspects, into a rubbish incinerator at Bagram air base, near Kabul.

General John Allen and US ambassador Ryan Crocker on the burning of Korans in Afghanistan

 

Muslims consider the Koran the literal word of God and treat each copy with the utmost respect.

 

Responding to the attacks, Gen Allen said: "We have to understand the significance of the great faith of Islam to these people and we have to account for that.

 

"But it doesn't push the relationship back."

 

He emphasised that over the 10 years of Nato's presence in Afghanistan, "thousands and thousands" of troops had shown "reverence" for the Islamic faith.

 

He also said he would be willing to walk, unarmed, into the Afghan Interior Ministry in Kabul, where two senior Nato military advisers were shot dead on Saturday.

 

Afghan authorities are also hunting a 25-year-old Afghan policeman over the shooting.

 

Last Thursday, two US soldiers were shot and killed by a man wearing Afghan army uniform during protests at a Nato base in eastern Nangarhar province.

 

A senior Afghan general told the BBC last week: "The virus of Taliban infiltration and rogue soldiers has spread like a cancer. Curing it has not helped. You need an operation."

 

More than 70 Nato troops have been killed by Afghan colleagues in recent years.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-17218152

 

3 years ago

"Muslims consider the Koran the literal word of God and treat each copy with the utmost respect."

 

Bu!! $hit!    If it suits their needs, they have no problem defiling the Qur'an.   Let's not lump all Muslims together as being devout.  And how about respect for life?  Respect for non-Muslims?  There is none by many of these people.

From the Afghanistan Gov't:
3 years ago

Joint Statement by the Delegations Assigned to Probe Bagram Incident

Saturday, 25 February 2012   

In the Name of Allah, the Most Merciful, the Most Compassionate    

Following the insulting and shameful act of burning Quran in Bagram airbase that injured the religious sentiments of the Islamic world and particularly of the Afghan Muslim nation, two delegations comprising of representatives from government, the National Council of Ulemma and the National Assembly were assigned and dispatched to investigate the circumstances and causes that have led to the inhumane incident.

The delegations, while deeply touched by the religious sentiments shown by the Afghan Muslim and Mujahid nation, inform our citizens of the following:

1. In view of the particular security situation in the country, we call on all our Muslim citizens of Afghanistan to exercise self-restraint and extra vigilance in dealing with the issue and avoid resorting to protests and demonstrations that may provide ground for the enemy to take advantage of the situation.

2. After the shameful incident by the US soldiers stationed in Bagram, senior NATO and American officials expressed their deep apologies to the Muslim nation of Afghanistan and assured that such incidents will not happen again.

3. NATO officials promised to meet Afghan nation’s demand of bringing to justice, through an open trial, those responsible for the incident and it was agreed that the perpetrators of the crime be brought to justice as soon as possible.

4. The assigned delegations demand from the government of Afghanistan to take over from the Americans the authority of the Bagram prison so no such incidents can recur and calls on the US government to fully and comprehensively cooperate to this end.

5. The delegations also want from the Afghan government to formally praise those brave Afghan army soldiers and all others who showed feelings against the disrespectful act by preventing more religious books and Quran copies from burning, so that the pure Muslim sentiments of our honored Mujahid nation can remain alive.

http://www.gmic.gov.af/english/index.php/features/255--joint-statement-by-the-delegations-assigned-to-probe-bagram-incident

3 years ago

Sandra: If that statement is an actual document it is despicable and if not is sure a good representation of the mindset of the administration and the dimmies that go along with this phony muslim "outrage". Just heard that two more US troops were killed by "friendlies" at another instillation today. Also heard on the radio that there have been other instances of these fatal attacks and also rapes of US military women that is being suppressed. This was a third hand comment so not sure how accurate it is but wouldn't be surprised since this administration and the lap puppies it has put in charge in DoD (even many of the senior uniformed personnel) would suppress anything that would make them, their favorite "religion", or their policies (like more women in exposed military jobs or "overlooking" problem personnel like the Ft Hood shooter) look bad.

3 years ago

John, there have been more killings?  How can that be?  Obama says that his apologies have calmed things down.

 

About GMIC:

The Government Media & Information Center (GMIC) was established in 2007 to respond to the great information need of the Afghan public, media, and other national and international stakeholders. With the presidential decree enacted in 2007, Government Media & Information Center started operation robustly and immediately.

 

GMIC aims at building trust amongst Afghan publics and other stakeholders through provision of timely and accurate information, continuous and consistent information dissemination, facilitation of coordination and information sharing amongst acting agencies in the Afghan government, independent media, and capacity building for Government’s information and communication portals.

http://www.gmic.gov.af/english/index.php/about/gmic

3 years ago

Sandra: Obumbler "says" a lot but little of it is true so people need to keep that in mind when The One preaches from the Mountain on anything. Unfortunately, there are a lot of mindless drones out there that drink in his "gospels" as "revelation". Sort of like his spiritual model, Mohammad the alleged "Prophet", who "divinely" dreamed up the Koran! The way things are going now we need a real leader who will turn a lot of places into radioactive slag to kill this cancer that is growing in many areas of the Mid East, Africa, and parts of Asia. The trend over the last three or so years in relation to US and Western security vs the alleged "religion of peace" (sure a lot of "peace" now in Afghanistan) has been very, very bad. I keep waiting for a "peaceful demonstration" of support for us from the "moderate muslims". Not holding my breath on that, though.

3 years ago

And once again LINDA, we are on the exact same page: I refer to - - - (primarily, the first paragraph of your post of one week ago.

As I mentioned, my posts have not been making it to my mail box of late, and I can't figure out why.

But I can find my way in by going into Care2 which I did not used to have to do. Does anyone know what I am doing wrong???




1 week ago



At this point why don't we just bring our troops home and let the Afghani and the Taliban (and al Quaeda) go at each other; continue to abuse women and children and all their other inhuman treatment of their own countrymen.



Then it was pointed out to me to question whether these were truly Afghani people and could possible be Pakistani. I suspect that it is probably both working together, and the Afghani are being stirred up by the Pakistani.



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Drink tea not...
3 years ago

 

 

                   

 

 

3 years ago

Jim, there have been problems with email from Care2 for some lately.    The thread 'Care 2 email' at the group 'Need Help in Care2?' may have the answer (I haven't read through them) and, if the answer to your problem is not there, you could post a question asking for help or start a new thread there.

 

http://www.care2.com/c2c/groups/disc.html?gpp=3287&pst=1637643

Nato's crisis of trust in Afghanistan
3 years ago


Nato's crisis of trust in Afghanistan
Abdul Saboor
Abdul Saboor was an obvious risk, it is alleged
The man blamed for killing two Nato officials inside the Afghan interior ministry at the weekend should never have been given security clearance, the BBC has learned. A catalogue of security blunders led to the shootings and his escape.
There are now real concerns for the future of the relationship between Nato and its Afghan security partners, Bilal Sarwary reports from Kabul.

 

The shootings are the latest in a long list of incidents in whichmembers of the Afghan security forces have turned their arms on coalition troops.

 

Officials feel powerless to stop them despite elaborate security mechanisms that are supposed to be in place.

 

Concern about the issue among US and Nato officials has now become so great that trust between them and Afghan security and military officials is at an all-time low. Many fear the long term strategic relationship between the two sides could be affected.

 

The interior ministry documents show that Abdul Saboor was sacked twice by police because on one occasion he got into a scuffle with his colleagues and another time he displayed violent behaviour.

 

But still he was able to get security clearance when he was re-hired by the police for a third time to work as an interior ministry driver.

 

"He should never have been a police intelligence officer," a frustrated Western military official posted in Afghanistan said. "He should have never got the security clearance."

Troops carry the remains of Lt Col John D Loftis, who died in the interior ministry attack
Nato troops are increasingly nervous of their Afghan counterparts

Occurrences in which Afghans turn their weapons on their Western counterparts happen on an almost weekly basis - shortly before the incident at the interior ministry, two US soldiers were shot and killed by an Afghan National Army soldier during protests at a Nato base in eastern Nangarhar province.

 

And on Thursday two more US soldiers were shot dead in the south of the country - Nato said one of the men was dressed in Afghan army uniform.

 

In fact, more than 70 Nato troops have been killed by Afghan colleagues in recent years, leading to what some diplomats say is an irretrievable breakdown of trust between the two sides.

 

Although Nato's Afghan commander Gen John Allen said he would still be willing to walk, unarmed, into the Kabul interior ministry, few coalition troops on the ground have such confidence in their Afghan colleagues - some of whom continue to receive Taliban propaganda on their mobile telephones.

 

The stark fact is that Nato troops are now nervous and twitchy whenever they are with their Afghan counterparts, and an investigation conducted by the BBC into what led to the interior ministry shootings on Saturday clearly explains why.

 

Page 1          http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-17219153

3 years ago

 

Interior ministry paperwork seen by the BBC suggests that the recruitment and vetting of personnel for the Afghan army and security forces is so deeply flawed that any effort to improve it is bound to be a time-consuming and painstaking process.

 

Western officials and their Afghan counterparts are in despair over how easily Abdul Saboor was able to bypass security in what was supposed to be a high security building and carry out the killings - apparently in retaliation to the burning of copies of the Koran by US soldiers.

 

''There are a number of serious security flaws," a senior officer of the National Directorate of Security (ND, told the BBC.

 

"The first thing you do when such an incident happens is lock down the building and detain everyone, including eyewitnesses. But no such drill was carried out in this case."

This allowed the killer to jump three security cordons surrounding the ministry, he said. As if this was not worrying enough in itself, the incident also graphically exposed serious lapses in the vetting process of Afghan soldiers and policemen.

 

Much revolves around the recruitment process itself - many prospective employees have fake identities, fake references and fake signatures.

That begs the question, how many more Abdul Saboor's might there be out there?


 

Violent behaviour

The documents seen by the BBC are hardly reassuring. They show that Abdul Saboor was twice fired from the Afghan National Police for "misconduct".

 

"How on earth then did he succeed in gaining entry to the intelligence wing of the police?" asked an investigating officer.

The mother of Abdul Saboor
Abdul Saboor's family say he began work in the interior ministry in 2007

"Who gave him security clearance to be deployed at such a sensitive spot with his record?"

 

That is a question that is likely to go unanswered - there is currently a blame game between different governments ministries as to who is responsible.

 

Some of Abdul Saboor's relatives believe that there may be a peculiarly Afghan answer to this question, linked to patronage and corruption.

 

They say that he succeeded in winning the trust and backing of former Minister Hanif Atmaar after returning from religious school in Pakistan in 2007 to work in the ministry as a tea boy.

 

Interior ministry sources say that two of Mr Atmaar's top aides acted as his guarantors when he expressed a desire to develop his career and join the police.

 

Mr Atmaar denied having anything to do with Abdul Saboor, who he said was sacked after only four months at the ministry. He says that the priority now is to find out who re-employed him and who gave him such high security clearance.

 

Such informal arrangements - often with employees whose records are never properly checked - are commonplace in government ministries and other public offices.

 

Western diplomats say the problem can only be sorted out once long term problems such as patronage, corruption, personal connections and nepotism are addressed.

 

They say that a turf war between the NDS - the country's main spy agency - and the defence ministry also needs to be resolved.

 

In another peculiarly Afghan dimension to the Abdul Saboor case, Western and Afghan officials say Shiren Agha, the commander in charge of interior ministry security, was responsible for his recruitment. Officials say that Mr Agha is related to Interior Minister Bismillah Khan by marriage.

 

Although Abdul Saboor worked only as a bodyguard and driver for Mr Agha, he was still allowed entry into the most sensitive installations at the interior ministry, where night raids, counter-terrorism and counter-narcotics operations are planned and controlled.

 

"As painful as it might be, it is a reality that a combination of time-honoured problems and serious mistakes allowed Saboor to get into the ministry," a Western diplomat said.

 

"It is a pattern that is being depressingly repeated across the country."

 

 

 

Page 2           http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-17219153

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