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State Opening of Parliament
2 years ago

A-Z of Parliament with Quentin Letts:

 

Q is for Queen Speech 

A-Z graphic

 

 

Quentin Letts works through the alphabet of the strange world of the UK Parliament as he looks at Q for Queen's Speech.

 

Her address at the State Opening of Parliament is usually held annually, but Wednesday's speech will be the first for two years.

 

See more A-Z of Parliament films  Please click on link

 

 

Video Queen's Speech what it all about - click on link below 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-17915714

 



This post was modified from its original form on 08 May, 11:56
Queen's Speech - previewing coalition government plans
2 years ago

Queen's Speech - previewing coalition government plans

Preparations are underway for the second Queen's Speech of this Parliament - and the first in two years - as the monarch heads to Westminster to unveil government plans.

 

Giles Dilnot talks to the political commentator Iain Martin, and Peter Riddell from the Institute for Government, about what could be in it, and how important the speech is for the coalition government.

Video  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-17990817

Queen's Speech 2012: What's expected - Bill-by-bill
2 years ago

Queen's Speech 2012: What's expected - Bill-by-bill

The Queen, pictured delivering the speech in 2010

The Queen's Speech on Wednesday will set out the government's plans. BBC political reporter Kayte Rath looks at what may be in it:

Banking Reform Bill

The most widely trailed measure expected to be included in the Queen's speech is the long awaited move to split banks into their retail and investment banking functions. The aim is to prevent the investment activities of a bank jeopardising its retail (high street) operations. The move was recommended by Sir John Vickers, after he was given the job of reviewing the banking sector in the wake of the financial crisis. It also suggested that only ring-fenced banks should be permitted to offer retail (high street) banking services. The retail arms would not be allowed to trade in derivatives or other exotic financial instruments blamed for the financial crash. Banks would have until 2019 to make the changes. A white paper is expected in June with draft legislation to follow in the autumn.

 

Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Bill

 

A wide-ranging bill which will reportedly bring in changes to the pay of top executives, rules on employment tribunals and redundancy and cut red tape for businesses. Companies such as Aviva and Barclays have recently seen embarrassing shareholder votes on the pay of their senior managers. Business Secretary Vince Cable is said to be keen change the rules to give shareholders a binding vote on on top pay policies. A requirement for a majority of 75% of shareholders to approve pay deals is thought to have been dropped following opposition from business leaders. It has been reported that the government wants a more "streamlined" employment tribunals system, with ministers said to favour the restriction of tribunals to cases of serious discrimination only.

 

Crime, Communications and Courts Bill

 

Driving under the influence of drugs of drugs could be made its own specific offence in this bill. In the future, police will be equipped with handheld detection devices to test saliva at the roadside in a similar way to using a breathalyser to test for alcohol. Offenders could face a fine of up to £5,000, a driving ban of at least 12 months as well as a prison term. The exact drugs covered by the offence and the specified limits for each will be decided following advice from a scientific review panel and public consultation.


Lords Reform Bill

 

Despite tension between the Coalition partners, a bill to bring in an elected senate to replace the House of Lords is expected to be announced. The Liberal Democrats have championed the changes, but all three main parties committed to reform in their 2010 manifestos. Under current Government plans the new senate would be made up of 300 members, with 80% of them elected. The bill could prove controversial and face substantial opposition in both chambers. Conservative backbench MPs have warned that reform is a distraction from more pressing concerns about the economy. The bill, which is expected to prove difficult to pass, may mean that other bills, for example on social care, dropped in order to make room for it.

 

National Crime Agency

 

Back in 2010, the Government pledged to establish a new National Crime Agency "to lead the fight against organised crime", enhance border security and fight fraud and cyber crime. Some have dubbed it 'Britain's FBI'. Legislation was promised at the "earliest suitable opportunity" and it is likely to be included in this Queen's Speech, with the new agency fully operational by December 2013.

 

Public Sector Pensions

Proposed changes to public sector pensions have led to large scale industrial action, but the Government looks set to move forward with its proposals. Chief Secretary to the Treasury Danny Alexander has talked of the need to legislate for changes, such as a move to career average schemes, in the next parliamentary session. This will allow the new schemes to start from 2015.

 


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2 years ago

 

Grocery Code Adjudicator Bill

 

This was introduced as a draft bill in the 2010-12 session and is now expected to be introduced as full legislation. It would create a new body to adjudicate between suppliers and retailers such as big name supermarkets to make sure suppliers get a fair deal. Those failing to do so could be 'named and shamed' or fined.

 

Defamation Bill

 

The Government has already investigated ways in which to reform libel laws, which could include claimants having to show they have suffered serious harm before suing for defamation. There could also be a system of preliminary hearings in which a judge could throw out spurious cases. Following a draft bill last year, a full bill is now expected.

 

Televising court proceedings

 

Reports have suggested that measures in the Queen's Speech could allow courts in England and Wales to start televising some of their proceedings. It is likely experiments would start with the Court of Appeal, but sentencing of criminals and the summing up of judges may also be included.

 

Internet surveillance

 

Back in April, David Cameron announced that he wanted to see "gaps" in national security plugged, which included plans for increased internet monitoring. This caused friction with his Liberal Democrat partners. President of the party, Tim Farron MP said they would "kill" any such plans. However, a draft bill is reportedly due to be announced.

 

Water Bill

 

A Water Bill that would introduce new controls on taking water out of rivers and give new guidance for water companies for longer term planning is expected to be included in the Queen's speech, but only in draft form. Although the Government originally committed to bring forward a full bill "as soon as parliamentary time allows", sources now say no bill will be put before MPs until the third session of parliament.

But what looks like it hasn't made it into the programme?

 

Social care

 

Possibly the biggest casualty of creating room for House of Lords reform, a bill to reform social care for the elderly and disabled now looks unlikely to be included in the Queen's Speech. A white paper on the issue was due by Easter but has been delayed until the summer. Campaigners have written to David Cameron urging him to prioritise reforms amid fears that some changes - such as who pays for care - could be delayed until after 2015.

 

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This post was modified from its original form on 08 May, 12:16
2 years ago

Gay marriage

 

In his 2011 conference speech, David Cameron announced his support for gay marriage but it has not proved popular with some of his Conservative colleagues. George Osborne told the BBC that whilst he supported the move personally, opposing views had to be listened to in a future consultation. This suggests it is unlikely to feature as a bill, or even a draft bill, in this Queen's Speech.

 

Higher Education Bill

 

 

This bill, as promised in the Higher Education White Paper, was expected to open up the university sector to private providers. However, reports in January this year suggest these reforms will be delayed indefinitely, possibly until after the next election.


High Speed Rail

 

 

The Government has committed to build a high speed rail link between London and Birmingham, and in time to Manchester and Leeds. A hybrid bill, like the one needed to build Crossrail in London, will have to be passed before work can start on the project. But reports suggest that there will be no such bill this time round.

 

Overseas aid

 

 

A long held goal to enshrine a target of spending 0.7% of GDP on overseas aid may now fall by the way side amid reports that it has been dropped from the Government's next legislative programme.

 

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This post was modified from its original form on 08 May, 12:21
2 years ago

Ray, I honestly enjoyed reading what the Queen will be speaking about...seems to me the UK and the US are mirroring each other in many ways especially all the delays in the "white paper."

2 years ago

Diane, What I find very comical about the Opening of Parliament, when the Queen, leave for Parliament, an MP is taken hostage by Buckingham Palace, Buckingham Palace will keep the MP there until the Queen return safe and well from Houses Parliament.,

 

furthermore, Houses of Parliament are searched for Gun Powder, once this has been done the Queen will make her way to the throne only then she will sit on the throne, all this is explaind in post one.

 

Mind you when watching the MP's when the Queen order's them into the House of Lords by Black Rod, the MP's have to walk in with the look of, couldn't careless, some parts of the State Opening of Parliament do date back to the English Civil War. It will be on TV in the morning around 10:00am.

 



This post was modified from its original form on 08 May, 14:46
2 years ago

Priceless, Ray. 

A to Z: Black Rod
2 years ago

Daine and Linda, in this post there is two video in relation to Black Rod, he is without doubt a very important man in British History, in the frist video gives details of his job, 

In video two shows Black Rod at work on the 2nd May 2012 on The closing moments of this session of Parliament as MPs and Lords do not sit for a week as Parliament has been prorogued until the 9th May 2012


A to Z: Black Rod

Pippa Simm takes a look at the man who plays a leading role among the pomp and ceremony at the State Opening of Parliament.

 

Video 1  http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/9718480.stm

 


Prorogation: MPs, Lords and Parliament are not sitting

Help

The closing moments of this session of Parliament as MPs and Lords do not sit for a week as Parliament has been prorogued, ahead of the Queen's Speech next Wednesday.

 

Lieutenant-General Arundell David Leakey, known as Black Rod, and Lord Strathclyde, Leader of the House of Lords, play their parts in closing the houses for a week, in the event known as prorogation.

 

Video 2       http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-17924716

Queen's Speech: Lords reform and parental leave top coalition plans
2 years ago

9 May 2012 Last updated at 11:42

 

Queen's Speech: Lords reform and parental leave top coalition plans

Coverage of the Queen's Speech


The Queen has set out the government's plans for the year ahead in a speech to both Houses of Parliament.

 

They include legislation to reform the House of Lords, plans to split up the banks and reform executive pay.

 

There are also moves to make parental leave more flexible and exempt the UK from future eurozone bailouts.

 

But Prime Minister David Cameron and deputy Nick Clegg have stressed their top priority remains cutting the deficit and restoring economic growth.

 

It is the first Queen's Speech - the grandest event on the parliamentary calendar - since shortly after the coalition was formed in 2010. The statement usually takes place each autumn.

 

The 14 bills and four draft bills - fewer than last time - have been billed as a fightback for the coalition after the Conservatives and their Lib Dem partners suffered heavy losses at last week's local elections.

 

But some fear that the inclusion of House of Lords reform in the legislative programme will stoke tensions between the two governing parties, with some Tory MPs strongly opposed to the plans.

 

Key legislation in the Queen's Speech includes:

 

  • Children and Families Bill: Mothers in England, Scotland and Wales will be able to transfer maternity leave to their partners. There will be better support for special needs pupils and improved access arrangements for divorced fathers in England. The adoption process in England will also be reformed to end delays and place less emphasis on the ethnicity of the child
  • Banking Reform Bill: Splitting banks into separate retail and investment arms
  • Draft Communications Bill: Making it easier for police and other agencies to access, store and share data on private phone calls and email communications
  • Crime and Courts Bill: Moving towards televised court proceedings and creating a specific offence of driving under the influence of drugs. Establishing a National Crime Agency
  • Groceries Code Adjudicator Bill: Curbing the power of large supermarkets and ensuring suppliers are "treated fairly and lawfully" through a new independent adjudicator
  • Electoral Registration and Administration Bill: Introducing individual voter registration to cut down on fraud

There is also a bill to establish a Green Investment Bank, make it easier for firms to sack workers by reforming the employment tribunal system and to strengthen shareholders' ability to curb directors' pay.

 

But Lords reform is likely to prove the most hotly-contested measure, with some Conservative MPs likely to fight plans for a smaller and mostly-elected second chamber.

 

Mr Cameron and Mr Clegg have stressed that the economy - rather than changing the composition of the Lords - is their top priority.

 

"The primary task of the government remains ensuring that we deal with the deficit and stretch every sinew to return growth to the economy, providing jobs and opportunities to hard-working people across Britain who want to get on," said the two party leaders in a joint statement.

 

But despite fears among MPs on all sides that the House of Lords Reform Bill will eat up too much Parliamentary time, they insisted it was in the best interests of the country to press ahead with the plans.

 

"We believe that power should be passed from the politicians at Westminster back to the people of Britain, which is why we will keep the promise in our parties' manifestos and reform the House of Lords, because those who make laws for the people should answer to the people."

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-17994738

 

 

 

Queen's Speech: David Cameron says plans will rebuild Britain
2 years ago

9 May 2012 Last updated at 16:39

 

Queen's Speech: David Cameron says plans will rebuild Britain

The Queen sets out the government's plans for the year ahead

[ Video ]

The Queen's Speech

David Cameron has hailed the coalition's plans for the year ahead as a "Queen's Speech to rebuild Britain".

 

They include flexible parental leave, breaking up the banks and exempting the UK from euro bailouts.

 

Lords reform is the most controversial measure in a slimmed down programme but the PM said boosting growth and cutting the deficit were his top priorities.

 

He denied Labour claims the plans include nothing to get young people into work or kick start the economy.

 

The prime minister told MPs: "Let me say exactly what this Queen's Speech is about. It is about a government taking the tough, long-term decisions to restore our country to strength.

 

"Dealing with the deficit, rebalancing the economy and building a society that rewards people who work hard and do the right thing."

 

Labour leader Ed Miliband said his party would support measures such as parental leave and a Green Investment Bank - but the Queen's Speech contained nothing for the young unemployed, working families and "millions of people who don't think the government is on their side".

 

David Cameron say the government is "taking tough decisions to help families who work hard and do the right thing" [Video]

 

"No change, no hope - that is the real message this Queen's Speech," Mr Miliband told MPs.

 

The legislative programme - unveiled by the Queen in a speech to MPs and peers - contained 15 bills and four draft bills, a much slimmer programme than in previous years.

 

It had been billed as a fightback for the coalition after the Conservatives and their Lib Dem partners suffered heavy losses at last week's local elections.

 

BBC Political Correspondent Norman Smith said it was a "hotch potch" of bills with "no over-arching theme", explicitly designed to prevent the government from becoming "bogged down" with difficult legislation when it should be focusing on the economy.

 

But some fear that the inclusion of House of Lords reform in the legislative programme will stoke tensions between the two governing parties, with some Tory MPs strongly opposed to the plans.

 

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2 years ago

 

Key legislation in the Queen's Speech includes:

  • Children and Families Bill: Mothers in England, Scotland and Wales will be able to transfer maternity leave to their partners. There will be better support for special needs pupils and improved access arrangements for divorced fathers in England. The adoption process in England will also be reformed to end delays and making inter-racial adoption easier
  • Banking Reform Bill: Splitting banks into separate retail and investment arms
  • Draft Communications Bill: Making it easier for police and intelligence agencies to access, store and share data on private phone calls and email communications
  • Crime and Courts Bill: Moving towards televised court proceedings and creating a specific offence of driving under the influence of drugs. Establishing a National Crime Agency
  • Groceries Code Adjudicator Bill: Curbing the power of large supermarkets and ensuring suppliers are "treated fairly and lawfully" through a new independent adjudicator
  • Electoral Registration and Administration Bill: Introducing individual voter registration to cut down on fraud

There is also a bill to establish a Green Investment Bank, make it easier for firms to sack workers by reforming the employment tribunal system and to strengthen shareholders' ability to curb directors' pay.

 

But Lords reform is likely to prove the most hotly-contested measure, with some Conservative MPs likely to fight plans for a smaller and mostly-elected second chamber.

 

In a joint statement, Mr Cameron and his Lib Dem deputy Nick Clegg said: "The primary task of the government remains ensuring that we deal with the deficit and stretch every sinew to return growth to the economy, providing jobs and opportunities to hard-working people across Britain who want to get on."

 

But they insisted pushing ahead with Lords reform was in the best interests of the country.

 

"We believe that power should be passed from the politicians at Westminster back to the people of Britain, which is why we will keep the promise in our parties' manifestos and reform the House of Lords, because those who make laws for the people should answer to the people."

 

Labour's Sadiq Khan said it was "not clear" how ministers planned to reform the House of Lords, or whether it remained a priority for the government. He also noted it made no mention of a referendum.

 

'Snooper's charter'

 

Proposals to give parents the right to request flexible working, such as fewer hours and job sharing, throughout their working lives also appear to have been dropped.

 

And there was no mention of legalising gay marriage, which will please some Conservative backbenchers who have criticised it as a distraction from fixing the economy, but the Home Office said it remained committed to introducing same-sex civil marriage "by the end of this Parliament" and a consultation was "still ongoing".

 

Planned reforms to adult social care in England also look a way off after the much-delayed publication of a government White Paper, which is now expected in the summer.

 

A bill to make it easier for the police and security services to intercept personal data has been published in draft form only, allowing for greater scrutiny before it becomes law, will please Lib Dem and Tory backbenchers angry at what they saw as plans for a "snooper's charter".

 

There is also a measure to deal with negative headlines generated by Chancellor George Osborne's decision to increase tax on charitable donations from the super rich, announced in last month's Budget

 

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This post was modified from its original form on 09 May, 11:58
2 years ago

 

When Black Rod summoned MPs, Dennis Skinner said: "Jubilee year, double-dip recession, what a start" Must see Video

 

A Small Donations Bill will provide a top up payment similar to Gift Aid to charities that receive small cash donations of £20 or less, enabling them to claim 25p for every £1 collected in the UK, on up to £5,000 of small donations.

 

In his Commons response to the speech Labour leader Ed Miliband also questioned why Lords reform was in the speech when senior ministers had said it was not a big priority.

 

He contrasted it with the absence of other coalition pledges, such as reforming adult social care, enshrining in law a commitment to spend 0.7% of national income on foreign aid and reform of lobbying rules.

 

He said Mr Cameron's proposals showed the government "just don't get it".

 

More detail on measures

 



This post was modified from its original form on 09 May, 11:59
In pictures: Queen's Speech
2 years ago

Diane and Linda, now that the State Opening of Parliament has finished ane Parliament is open again, I will now return to my UK and EU Political Threads, Pictures of the Queens Speech each Picture has captions so when viewing the picture you will know what the picture is about, please click on the link below

 

In pictures: Queen's Speech

 

The Queen leaves Buckingham Palace for the Palace of Westminster
The Queen delivers the Queen's Speech to formally open Parliament. The monarch travelled from Buckingham Palace to the Palace of Westminster with the Duke of Edinburgh in the Australian State royal carriage

 

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