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Friday Night Recipe Dump: Puttanesca Sauce
1 year ago

Puttanesca Sauce

 

Why this recipe works:

 

To replicate the long-simmered flavor of traditional tomato sauce in our quick-cooking version, we start by caramelizing onions—finely diced for more surface area—in butter. Dried herbs and garlic complete the base flavors. Canned crushed tomatoes, which require no chopping or pureeing, are the bulk of our sauce, and a pinch of sugar rounds out their tang. Stir in a few final ingredients at the end, and guests will think this 20-minute concoction has been simmering on the stove all day.

The Recipe
1 year ago

Makes about 3 cups; enough for 1 pound pasta

The test kitchen’s preferred brands of crushed tomatoes are Muir Glen Organic Crushed Tomatoes with Basil and Tuttorosso Crushed Tomatoes in Thick Puree with Basil.

Ingredients            

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped onion
  • 4 anchovy fillets, rinsed and minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  •   Salt and pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 (28-ounce) can crushed tomatoes
  • 1/4 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/4 cup pitted kalamata olives, chopped
  • 3 tablespoons capers, rinsed and minced
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

Instructions

  • Melt butter in medium saucepan over medium-low heat. Add onion, anchovies, pepper flakes, ½ teaspoon salt, and oregano and cook, stirring occasionally, until onion is golden brown, 3 to 5 minutes. Add garlic and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Stir in tomatoes and sugar, increase heat to high, and bring to simmer. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer until thickened slightly, about 10 minutes. Off heat, stir in olives, capers, and oil. Season with salt and pepper to taste, and serve.

~ Cook's Country

1 year ago

I've very fond of Italian food.    This sauce is one of my favorites.    Hope you'll make this over the weekend and report back!

Cranberry-Pecan Spice Cake
1 year ago

Cranberry-Pecan Spice Cake

Why this recipe works:

 

To infuse our favorite Bundt cake with the flavors of fall, we start by making a cranberry “jam,” cooking frozen berries down with orange juice and sugar before pureeing them in the food processor. We cook pecans until they’re toasted and fragrant and then grind them to a fine powder. This nut “flour” gets stirred into the cake batter, along with pumpkin pie spice for all-in-one flavor. We layer the batter into a Bundt pan with our cranberry mixture, creating a sweet-tart swirl throughout the finished cake. A simple cream cheese glaze is the finishing touch.

 

The Recipe
1 year ago

Makes one cake

Ingredients            

  • 8 ounces (2 cups) fresh or frozen cranberries
  • 1/2 cup (3 1/2 ounces) granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup orange juice
  • 1 1/2 cups pecans, toasted, cooled, and ground fine
  • 1 tablespoon pumpkin pie spice
  • 1 recipe Classic Yellow Bundt Cake batter (see related content)
  • 2 tablespoons cream cheese, softened
  • 2 tablespoons whole milk
  • 1 cup (4 ounces) confectioners' sugar

Instructions

  • FOR THE FILLING: Bring cranberries, granulated sugar, and orange juice to boil in medium saucepan over medium-high heat. Cook, stirring occasionally, until cranberries have broken down and juices have thickened slightly, 8 to 10 minutes. Transfer mixture to food processor and process until smooth, 10 to 15 seconds. Let cool completely.
  • FOR THE CAKE: Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and heat oven to 325 degrees. Grease and flour 12-cup nonstick Bundt pan. Combine pecans and pie spice in small bowl, then stir into cake batter until incorporated. Spoon half of batter into prepared pan and smooth top. Using back of spoon, create ½-inch-deep channel in center of batter. Spoon half of filling into channel. Using butter knife, thoroughly swirl filling into batter. Repeat with remaining batter and filling. Bake until skewer inserted in center comes out clean, 70 to 75 minutes, rotating pan halfway through baking. Let cake cool in pan on wire rack for 10 minutes. Remove cake from pan and let cool completely on rack, about 2 hours.
  • FOR THE GLAZE: Whisk cream cheese and milk together in medium bowl until combined and no lumps remain. Whisk in confectioners’ sugar until smooth. Drizzle evenly over top of cooled cake and let sit until glaze is firm, about 1 hour. Serve.

~ Cook's Country

1 year ago

Heaven, I'm in heaven.  This weekend will be a nice meal.  Thank yoiu Diane and yoiu outdid yoiurself.  

1 year ago

Puttanesca sauce is one of our favorites.  The bundt cake sounds delicious.

1 year ago

Puttanesca is a very easy sauce to make.  I never use up a whole tin of anchovies in a short period of time, so I keep a tube of anchovy paste in the refrigerator to use as needed.

1 year ago

I use the anchovy paste, too.   However, it is not always easy to find in the grocery stores.   Buying a can of anchovies for this recipe is reasonably priced so if you have to throw some of it away it won't break the bank.   

 

Italian sauces are all very easy to make.    It's the same technique over and over witht he exception of the carbonara sauce.   

 

Italian food is what I love to cook the most.  

 

I will add here, too, that if you can find tomato paste in a tube buy it.   It, too, has a long shelf life in the refrigerator like the anchovy paste.    You might have to look beyond your local grocery store if you live in a rural area.

 

I very much enjoy everyone's input on these recipes.     Keep your comments coming....I learn something new every day.

1 year ago

Diane, made both today and they were both a hit.  I got busy baking and made a pumpkin cake as well.  I wasn't sure what the boys would think of the anchovies but they never even noticed them (LOL).

Now, I am with you Diane about the anchovies.  I did look for the paste and didn't find it and didn't want to hit all the different supermarkets looking for it so just bought the tin of anchovies. I do use tomato paste in the tube and you are so right, it keeps for a long time refrigerated.  So many of the recipes we make only want a tablespoon or two and so the smallest can is about twice what we need.  Therefore, we just use the tube and keep it refrigerated.

I tried a new potato soup recipe this week and will share it on your next recipe column, Diane.  It is a different take as the it is more of a cream soup; you run it through the blender  at one point so it has a creamy consistency and it was so good.  I liked it for a change in texture.  Also, I have a new recipe for dinner rolls that only takes 1 hour to make.  Very fast and something that you can do while preparing the rest of dinner; very simple and so nice and and wonderful flavor.
 

1 year ago

Fantastic, Linda!  The potato soup sounds good and it's the right time of the year for soup!   Anchovies dissolve in the sauce and that's probably why your little ones didn't notice them.  Put them on a pizza and that's a different story.

 

And the new roll recipe.....put that one up Friday, too, under my thread.   Please, everyone, join in with your favorite recipes and techniques.

1 year ago

I get my anchovie paste at the commissary or Whole Foods.  Same with the tomato paste in a tube.   The anchovies, as you say Diane, seem to dissolve in sauces or in caesar dressing.  They add flavor without being noticeable.   I like to saute broccoli in a pan with olive oil, anchovies & garlic. My finicky daughter has decided that cooking with anchovies is not so bad afterall.  I can't bring myself to buy a tin of anchovies and waste most of it.  Supposedly, if you cover them with olive oil in the frig they'll keep for 6 months (so it says online).

My mother did like pizza with anchovies.  Not for me.

I'll be looking forward to seeing your recipes Linda.  It's getting to be that time of year when hot soups are great to have.  Interested in the roll recipe, too.   I used to use a blender for cream soups and decided to get an immersion blender a few years ago.  Makes it all easier to do. 

1 year ago

Sandy, I use my immersion blender, too and yes, it is easier and less of a hassle to clean.  I would never be without it again.

Diane, it is soup weather and I have about 5 new soup recipes to try.  The potato was the first and it is so nice.  I am a soup fan in the winter thanks to my Mom.  She would make all homemade soups and it was so nice to come home, both from school from Kindergarten through one year of college and then as an adult with my own children) and smell the soup on the stove simmering as she would start it in the morning right after cleaning up from breakfast and let it simmer all day.  There was usually homemade bread or rolls to go with it, too.  I loved Fall and Winter as a result.  It was the best way to use those last of the garden veggies and then start on the ones she had preserved.  But remember, my great-grandmother, grandmother and mom all lived in farm country and that is what you find; lots of "plain farm cooking"; simpler food and lots of it.  

Do either of you know what "Patty Pan" or white scallop square are?  A summer-type of squash?  The were round and scalloped edge.  Mom used to peel them, cut them into wedges and then cut the wedges into thin slices and she would cook it with onions, crumbled bacon and V-8 juice with a cup of 2 of chicken broth and 1/3 cup of tomato paste and basil, oregano and salt and pepper to taste.  It was so good with fresh rolls and served as a main dish.  I used to fix it for my own children and it was surprising that they would eat squash this way; they wouldn't eat zucchini but they would eat this squash dish.  You cooked it until the squash was translucent.  I may have to try and find some of those squash and fix it as suddenly my mouth is watering.

1 year ago

I have cooked patty pan only once.  It's not something I usually find around here unfortunately.  Didn't peel it though, then grilled it.

1 year ago

Never heard of it....patty pan....but I can say that I want to cook it.    This is what I mean when I a!k that all of you bring forth your recipes.    All of us were raised to know our family meals and I don't want those recipes to be lost.   We need to share them.   Thank you Sandy and Linda.   Let's share those meals that we were raised on.   So much fun.

1 year ago

 They're kinda cute, little squashes.

Some are bigger, but I've only seen the small ones.

Stuffed looks interesting.

1 year ago

Sandy, these are small.  The ones we grew would get to about 4 - 6" in diameter and so nice.  We would peel the skin from them and then dice the squash, add crumbled bacon (a nice amount) and the V-8 juice with tomato paste (the small can size) and the chicken broth (about 2 cups) and then bring it to a boil, reduce heat to simmer and let it cook until the squash was translucent.  (oh, forgot, about 2 squash of the 6" size, 3 of the 4" and 1 large onion chopped). You didn't have to cook the onions or squash ahead of time, but you could saute the onion if you wished.  They were so good.  I know that there are other recipes for them, but that was my comfort one.

Thank you for finding the picture.  Diane, you can grow these.  They grow on a bush similar to zucchini.

1 year ago

Second & Third pictures from the bottom are the large ones & look to be the size you used.  Maybe the larger ones have a thicker skin, but it isn't necessary to peel the small ones at all.  It's just like zucchini, no need to peel.  Your mom's recipe sounds really good, especially the bacon part. 

1 year ago
Squash (Summer) Seeds - "Scallop, Early White Bush" HEIRLOOM - Cucurbita pepo
Squash-Scallop.jpg
Found them at Eden Brothers (Seeds) and following is their link.  This is the actual one that we planted and the skin is a little too thick to eat so we peeled them.  
Product Description:
Heirloom "Scallop Early White Bush" Squash Seeds
 
This interesting heirloom summer squash is also commonly known as “Patty Pan” or “Pattypan”. This is an ancient variety very much prized by the native North American Indians and early European settlers alike. Its culinary uses are almost endless – can be steamed, baked, grilled with butter, used in breads, cakes, casseroles, or more! 

I will have to plant some next Spring as they are really nice summer squash.  And yes, Sandy, lots of bacon.  Mom never skimped on the bacon with this and it made a nice summer meal.  I am going to do some checking for other reciples, too as they are pretty proliferic like zucchini.  Mom would plant just two plants and we were giving them away.  

And I might add that she would cook up the squash in this manner and then put it in heavy freezer bags (seal-a-meal type) and freeze it in meal-sized packages.  Easy to then just take out a package and heat it for a quick dinner.
1 year ago

I need to have hubbie try them next year.  I pleaded with him not to grow anymore cucumber (as well as the hot peppers).  There aren't enough cucumber recipes that I enjoy especially given the number he grew.  Not too many for cooked cucumber either or else I'd just freeze them. 

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