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Can you name it ????
8 months ago



This post was modified from its original form on 19 Feb, 1:33
8 months ago

I an not sure, but I believe some other people from this group might be able to help you out.



This post was modified from its original form on 22 Feb, 17:23
I must admit ....
8 months ago

I know what our little friend is .... I was asking as a game to see if we could actually get people talking and joining and taking part in here .....

Go to the top of the class Diva, @ least you answered

Brambling
8 months ago

Latin name

Fringilla montifringilla

Family

Finches (Fringillidae)

Where to see them

In winter likes beech woodland, farmland fields near woods. Look in flocks of chaffinches and other finches. In autumn look along east coast woodlands and fields. Will visit gardens in winter.

When to see them

Watch out for them from mid-September until March and April. Occasional birds stay into May or even later.

What they eat

Seeds in winter; insects in summer.

How about this Pair???
8 months ago

Siskin
7 months ago

Latin name

Carduelis spinus

Family

Finches (Fringillidae)

Where to see them

In the breeding season, look for it in the tops of trees in suitable habitat in Scotland and Wales, where they are fairly common. In winter they are seen more widely across England as well.

When to see them

All year round.

What they eat

Seeds, especially of conifers, alders and birch, and some insects.

The male has a black crown (tipped grey in autumn), and a black chin. Both these features distinguish the Siskin from all other yellow-green finches. The rump, eye stripe, neck and breast are yellowish. They have a yellow wing-bar and a grey-white belly. The outer tail feathers are black and yellow. The female is grey with no black on the head, and whitish streaked under parts. They are distinguished from the Serin at all ages by the yellow patches at the base of the tail.

How about this little beauty ???
7 months ago

Superb Fairywren
6 months ago

The Superb Fairywren (Malurus cyaneus), also known as the Superb Blue-wren or colloquially as theBlue Wren, is a passerine bird of the family Maluridae, common and familiar across southeastern Australia. The species is sedentary and territorial, also exhibiting a high degree of sexual dimorphism;the male in breeding plumage has a striking bright blue forehead, ear coverts, mantle, and tail, with a black mask and black or dark blue throat. Non-breeding males, females and juveniles are predominantly grey-brown in colour; this gave the early impression that males were polygamous, as all dull-coloured birds were taken for females. Two subspecies groups are recognized: the larger and darker Tasmanian formcyaneus and the smaller and paler mainland form cyanochlamys.

Like other fairywrens, the Superb Fairywren is notable for several peculiar behavioural characteristics; the birds are socially monogamous and sexually Promiscuous, meaning that although they form pairs between one male and one female, each partner will mate with other individuals and even assist in raising the young from such pairings. Male wrens pluck yellow petals and display them to females as part of a courtship display.

The Superb Fairywren can be found in almost any area that has at least a little dense undergrowth for shelter, including grasslands with scattered shrubs, moderately thick forest, woodland, heaths, and domestic gardens. It has adapted well to the urban environment and is common in suburban Sydney,Canberra and Melbourne. The Superb Fairywren mainly eats insects and supplements its diet with seeds.

Australian again ???
4 months ago

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