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anonymous Chow Chow September 06, 2007 5:06 PM

For more heat, add chopped jalapeño to the vegetables.

Ingredients

5 green bell peppers
5 red bell peppers
2 large green tomatoes
2 large onions
1/2 small cabbage
1/4 cup pickling salt
3 cups sugar
2 cups white vinegar (5% acidity)
1 cup water
1 tablespoon mustard seeds
1 1/2 teaspoons celery seeds
3/4 teaspoon turmeric

PreparationChop first 5 ingredients.

Stir together chopped vegetables and salt in a large Dutch oven. Cover and chill 8 hours. Rinse and drain; return mixture to Dutch oven. Stir in sugar and remaining ingredients. Bring to a boil; reduce heat, and simmer 3 minutes.

Pack hot mixture into hot jars, filling to 1/2 inch from top. Remove air bubbles; wipe jar rims. Cover at once with metal lids, and screw on bands.

Process in boiling-water bath 15 minutes.

Yield

5 1/2 pints

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anonymous  August 22, 2007 2:36 PM

Green Tomato Relish

 
Makes about 3 pints
Recipe may be doubled; increase cooking time by 10-15 minutes




10 calories, 0g fat, 60mg sodium, 0g fiber, per Tablespoon

2 lb. green tomatoes, cored and chopped
1 lb. white or yellow onions, chopped
3/4 lb. sweet red peppers, cored and chopped
1/2 lb. tart cooking apples, such as 'Granny Smith', cored and chopped
6 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 cup apple cider vinegar
1 Tablespoon kosher or sea salt
4 jalapeno peppers, cored, seeded if desired, and finely chopped
2 Tablespoons chopped cilantro
1 teaspoon ground cumin (optional)

Combine the tomatoes, onions, peppers, apples, garlic, vinegar, and salt in a large,nonreactive saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, until thickened, about an hour.

Stir in the jalapenos, cilantro, and cumin and simmer for 5 more minutes. Carefully puree the mixture using a stick blender
or in a traditional countertop blender (in batches if necessary) until still somewhat chunky.

If canning, return the pureed relish to a boil, then ladle the hot mixture into hot jars, leaving 1/4-inch head space. Process 15 minutes in a boiling-water canner. Store in a cool, dark place.
 [report anonymous abuse]
 
anonymous  August 22, 2007 4:47 AM

Michael...way to go!!!  They always look so pretty when you remove them from the canner...I remember my mom putting them on a thick towel to cool...love them cooked with red potatoes and served with pickeled beets...mmmmmm

From Willow...also posted in the autumn recipes...


Willow T.
StarsButterflies 

 Tuesday, 9:14 AM

Crockpot Apple Butter

7 cups applesauce, unsweetened
2 cups apple cider
1 1/2 cups honey
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
1/2 teaspoon allspice

In a crockpot, mix all ingredients. Cover and cook on low heat for 14 to 15 hours, or until the mixture is deep brown. Pack while hot into 4 hot pint jars. Process in hot-water bath for 10 minutes, counting the time after the jars have been immersed and the water comes again to a rolling boil. Makes 4 pints.



This post was modified from its original form on 22 Aug, 4:47  [report anonymous abuse]
 
 August 16, 2007 7:23 PM

We pressure caned half ruiner green beans today 30 quarts.
10 psi for 25 minutes. We have a 7 quart canner And have about that much more to pick and can tomorrow.
 [ send green star]
 
anonymous  August 16, 2007 4:19 PM

Cranberry Sauce 

Ingredients:
4 1/4 cups cranberries
1 3/4 cup water
2 cups sugar

Directions:

Wash cranberries; drain. combine cranberries and water in a large sauce pot. Boil until skins burst. Press mixture through a sieve or food mill. Add sugar to cranberry pulp and juice. Boil mixture almost to jelling point.

Ladle hot sauce into hot jars leaving 1/4 inch headspace. Adjust two piece caps. Process 10 minutes in a boiling water canner.

Variation: Stick cinnamon or whole cloves tied in a spice bag may be cooked with the sauce to give a spicy flavor. remove spice bag before canning sauce.

Note: to serve jellied sauce as a mold, pack sauce in wide mouth canning jars for easy removal.

This recipe for Cranberry Sauce serves/makes 2 pints

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anonymous  August 12, 2007 11:54 AM

FREEZING PUMPKIN
  1. Select full-colored, mature pumpkin with texture that is fine rather than coarse and stringy
  2. Wash, cut into quarters or smaller pieces, and remove seeds. Cook pumpkin pieces until soft in boiling water, in steam, in a pressure cooker or in an oven.
  3. Remove pulp from rind and mash or press it through a sieve.
  4. To cool, place pan containing pumpkin in cold water, stirring occasionally.
  5. Pack into containers, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Seal, label and freeze.

CANNING PUMPKINS-CUBED

QUANTITY: An average of 16 pounds is needed per canner load of 7 quarts; an average of 10 pounds is needed per canner load of 9 pints--an average of 2-1/4 pounds per quart.

QUALITY: Pumpkins should have a hard rind and stringless, mature pulp of ideal quality for cooking fresh. Small size pumpkins (sugar or pie varieties) make better
products.

PROCEDURE: Wash, remove seeds, cut into 1 inch-wide slices and peel. Cut flesh into 1-inch cubes. Boil 2 minutes in water. CAUTION: DO NOT MASH OR PUREE. Fill hot jars with cubes and cooking liquid, leaving 1-inch
headspace. Add ½ teaspoon salt to pints, 1 teaspoon salt to quarts.) Adjust lids and process.

Pressure -process at 10 pounds pints for 55 minutes, quarts for 90 minutes. Remove jars; complete seals if necessary.

For making pies, drain jars and strain or sieve cubes.

 [report anonymous abuse]
 
anonymous  August 07, 2007 4:31 PM

Tutti-Frutti Jam
with powdered pectin

  • 3 cups chopped or ground pears (about 2 pounds pears)
  • 1 large orange
  • ¾ cup drained crushed pineapple
  • ¼ cups chopped maraschino cherries (3-ounce bottle)
  • ¼ cup lemon juice
  • 1 package powdered pectin
  • 5 cups sugar

Yield: About 6 or 7 half-pint jars

Procedure: Sterilize canning jars and prepare two-piece canning lids according to manufacturer's directions.

To prepare fruit. Sort and wash ripe pears; pare and core. Chop or grind pears. Peel orange, remove seeds and chop or grind pulp

To make jam. Measure chopped pears into a kettle. Add orange, pineapple, cherries, and lemon juice. Stir in pectin. Place on high heat and, stirring constantly, bring quickly to a full boil with bubbles over the entire surface. Add sugar, continue stirring, and heat again to full bubbling boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat; skim.

Fill hot jam immediately into hot, sterile jars, leaving ¼ inch headspace. Wipe rims of jars with a dampened clean paper towel; adjust two-piece metal canning lids. Process in a Boiling Water Canner.

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anonymous lots of helpful info...great for beginners August 07, 2007 4:29 PM

http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can4_vegetable.html  [report anonymous abuse]
 
anonymous Creamy Apple Butter August 05, 2007 9:26 AM

2 pounds apples, peeled, cored, quartered
1-1/2 cups apple cider
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
1 tablespoon lemon juice

Instructions:
Place apples and cider in large stock pot or dutch oven. Cover and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat and simmer 30 minutes. Stir in sugars, apple pie spice and lemon juice. Simmer an additional hour, until very thick.

If freezing, pour hot apple butter into freezer containers, leaving 1/2-inch head space. Cover and freeze.

NOTE: Apple butter should be of smooth consistancy for easy spreading. If apple butter is lumpy, beat with a hand mixer to reach desired consistency.
 [report anonymous abuse]

 
 July 31, 2007 7:06 AM

Yum!

Shannon

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anonymous  July 30, 2007 2:27 PM

Bottled Apricots with VanillaThe recipes and text below is reprinted with permission from Perfect Preserves by Hilaire Walden. If you’re unfamiliar with the boiling-water canning method of preserving foods, you’ll want to check out this book for detailed instructions (do not attempt canning if you don’t have proper instructions).

Instead of using whole vanilla beans, strips of orange rind or cinnamon sticks can be added to the jars for a different flavor. Or, you could experiment with more exotic spice such as cardamom and star anise.

About 3 lbs. firm but ripe apricots
2/3 cup sugar
1/2 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 2/1 cups water
2 whole vanilla beans

Makes About 10 Cups

1. Immerse the apricots in a pan of gently boiling water for 20 to 30 seconds. Immediately remove the apricots from the water and off their skins using a small sharp knife or your fingers, if they come easily. Leave to cool.

2. Put the sugar, lemon juice, and water in a saucepan over low heat, stirring, until the sugar has dissolved. Bring to a boil.

3.; Add the apricots to the syrup, in batches, if necessary, and poach for 10 minutes.

4. Using a slotted spoon, immediately transfer the apricots to two warm, sterilized 5-cup jars. Slit the vanilla beans lengthwise with a knife and add two halves to each jar.

5. When all the apricots have been removed from the pan, boil the syrup for 5 minutes. Pour into prepared jars to within 1/2 inch of the top. Swirl the jars to expel any air bubbles and seal them. Process in a boiling water canner.

6. Store in a cool, dark, dry place for one month before eating. Use within 12-18 months.

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anonymous Sorry....full instructions for the peach jam July 26, 2007 7:51 PM

Peel and pit, then chop peaches.
Measure exactly 3 cups peaches into large bowl.
Add sugar and lemon juice; mix well.
Let stand 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.
Mix water and pectin in small saucepan. Bring to boil on high heat, stirring constantly.
Continue boiling and stirring 1 minute.
Add to peach mixture; stir 3 minutes or until sugar is dissolved.
Add spices quickly. < Fill all plastic containers to 1 2 inch tops. Wipe off edges of containers; immediately cover with lids.
Let stand at room temperature 24 hours.
Jam is now ready to use.
Store in refrigerator up to 3 weeks or freeze extra containers up to 1 year.
Thaw in refrigerator before using.

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anonymous  July 26, 2007 7:40 PM

Peach Freezer jam recipe

Making your own freezer jam can be quick and fun!
The combinations are endless,delicious, aromatic and rewarding.It a great and quick way to capture summer's bounty to enjoy in the middle of winter

The basic recipe is :
Ingredients
3 cups prepared fruit (about 2 lb. ripe peaches)
4-1/2 cups sugar
2 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice
½ teaspoon of cinnamon
¼ teaspoon of nutmeg
3/4 cup water
1 box SURE.JELL Fruit Pectin (found in most grocery stores)

Peel and pit, then chop peaches.
Measure exactly 3 cups peaches into large bowl.
Add sugar and lemon juice; mix well.
Let stand 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.
Mix water and pectin in small saucepan. Bring to boil on high heat, stirring constantly.
Continue boiling and stirring 1 minute.
Add to peach mixture; stir 3 minutes or until sugar is dissolved.
Add spices quickly.  [report anonymous abuse]

 
anonymous  July 24, 2007 8:20 PM

Italian Vegetable Pickle

When neatly packed, these jars of pickles look so satisfyingly impressive on the pantry or cupboard shelf that it makes the troubles and care taken seem worthwhile. But their attractiveness is their downfall, because all too soon someone won’t be able to resist temptation and will delve indiscriminately into a jar to try some of its contents (why is it nearly always from the bottom) and the whole effect will be ruined.

1/2 lb. zucchini, cut into matchstick strips
1/2 lb. trimmed fennel, cut into matchstick strips
3/4 lb. eggplant, cut into matchstick strips
1 lb. red bell pepper, cut into strips
1 yellow bell pepper, cut into strips
2 celery sticks, sliced
1/3 lb. baby radishes
1/4 lb. button mushroom, stalks trimmed
3/4 cup Kosher salt
7 1/2 cups water
5 garlic cloves, cut into slivers
4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
3 tablespoons walnut oil
6 1/4 to 8 3/4 cups white wine vinegar
4 dried chili peppers
8 small sprigs each of fresh thyme and rosemary
8 small bay leaves

Makes About 8 2/3 Cups

1. Layer the vegetables, except the garlic, in a large, non-metallic bowl, sprinkling with salt between layers. Pour the water over the vegetables. Put a weighted plate on top to keep the vegetables under the water. Leave in a cool place overnight.

2. The nest day, pour the vegetables into a colander and rinse under cold running water. Drain, and dry thoroughly with a clean cloth. Spread out on another dry, clean cloth and let air-dry completely.

3. Transfer vegetables to a bowl and mix in the garlic and oils.

4. Pour a thin layer of vinegar into hot sterilized jars. Divide half the chilis and herbs among the jars. Pack in the vegetables as tightly as possible. When jars are about half filled, add the remaining chilis and herbs. Continue filling he jars.

5. Pour in enough vinegar to cover the vegetables and come within 1/4 inch of he top of the jars, pressing the vegetables down. Swirl the jars to expel air bubbles and seal. Let cool, then label and store in a cool, dark, dry place for at least one month before eating. Keeps for up to 6 months in a cool, dark, dry place.



This post was modified from its original form on 24 Jul, 20:21  [report anonymous abuse]
 
anonymous  July 22, 2007 9:56 AM

Peach-Raspberry-Lavender Jam

 

Lavender adds a floral note, but you can omit it if you like. Prep and Cook Time: 45 minutes, plus 2 hours to chill. Notes: To see whether the jam has cooked long enough to thicken to your taste, put a tablespoonful onto a plate you've chilled for 20 minutes in the freezer. The jam will cool and thicken to its final consistency.

Ingredients

2 teaspoons dried culinary lavender buds
1 pound (about 5) ripe peaches, peeled, pitted, and chopped into 1-inch pieces
3 ounces (1/2 pint) red raspberries, rinsed
1 1/2 cups sugar
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

Preparation1. Put lavender buds in a small bowl. Pour 1/4 cup boiling water over the buds and let steep 10 minutes. Strain the scented water into a bowl and set aside; discard buds.

2. In a 4-quart pan over medium-high heat, combine peaches, raspberries, sugar, and lemon juice. Bring to a boil and cook, stirring often, until liquid has the consistency of thick maple syrup, about 14 minutes. Stir in the lavender water and boil, stirring often, another 2 minutes, or until mixture reaches desired thickness (see notes).

3. Remove jam from heat and let cool for 15 minutes. Chill, covered, at least 2 hours before using. Jam keeps, chilled, up to 4 weeks.

Note: nutritional analysis is per tablespoon.

Yield

Makes about 3 cups

Nutritional Information

CALORIES 28(0.0% from fat); FAT 0.0g (sat 0.0g); PROTEIN 0.1g; CHOLESTEROL 0.0mg; SODIUM 0.1mg; FIBER 0.2g; CARBOHYDRATE 7.3g

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anonymous Thank You Nancy Lou!!! July 20, 2007 4:13 PM

Here is a nice fall recipe...

Carrot Pumpkin Butter 4:10 PM

Ingredients:


1 1/2 cups cooked, mashed pumpkin (not canned!)
1 1/2 cups cooked carrots, coarsly mashed
2 cups granulated sugar* (see note)
1/2 teaspoon oil of cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon oil of cloves
1/2 teaspoon lemon juice

You will need:
5-6 half-pint glass canning jars and lids

*Note: Brown sugar may be substituted for the granulated sugar in this recipe for a darker "butter".

Instructions:
Combine all ingredients in 3-quart enamel pan and stir well. Bring to boil and reduce heat. Simmer uncovered, 30 minutes until mixture is thickened.

Ladle into half-pint jars, wipe jar rims, and attach lids. Process in boiling water bath 15 minutes. Invert onto towel 5 minues, then set upright to cool. You should hear the lids pop when vacuum seals.

Yield: About 2 1/2 pints.

 [report anonymous abuse]
 
anonymous Relish July 11, 2007 5:58 AM

1relishdsu00202.jpg

5 large onions

12 large unpeeled cucumbers

1 or 2 red peppers

1/2 cup pickling salt

Grind vegetables in food processor and place in a large container. Pour pickling salt over and let stand 2 hours.  Drain and rinse.

Syrup:

3 cups vinegar

3 cups white sugar

1 tsp dry mustard

3 tsp celery seed

1 tsp ginger

3/4 tsp tumeric

1 cup water

Boil ingredients together.  Add vegetables and boil for another 20 minutes.  Put into jars and seal.

Makes about six pints.

 [report anonymous abuse]
 
anonymous Sauerkraut July 11, 2007 5:56 AM

1cabbagehead1.jpg

5 cups water

2 tbsp vinegar

2 tbsp pickling salt

Shred cabbage into jars. Add till the neck of jar. Boil water, vinegar and pickling salt for 5 minutes.  Cool.   (approx 3 heads, depending on size)

Add brine enough to neck of jar.  Don't screw lids on too tight as the juice will run over.  Should say nice and white in color. 

Ready to taste 1 month

Makes approx 3 quarts

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anonymous Dilled Carrots July 11, 2007 5:55 AM

My kids loved these pickled carrots~one can use in variation ~yellow beans to this recipe also

1carrottee_got_carrots_sm.gif

4 cups water

4 cups vinegar

2 cups sugar

3/4 cup pickling salt

carrots, sliced thinly

dill

garlic cloves

Pack sealers with 1 clove of garlic, dill and thinly sliced carrots.  You can use baby carrots, and not slice~

Boil vinegar, sugar and pickling salt together.  Pour over carrots and seal.

Let stand at least 1  month before using.

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anonymous  July 11, 2007 5:54 AM

1cucumbers.jpg

Season with cucumbers is soon~ some love having the taste sooner the better~

Refrigerator Pickles

3 cups white sugar  
 2 cups  vinegar
 1 tsp coarse pickling salt
 1 tsp turmeric
 1 tsp celery seed
 1 tsp mustard seed
 

2 to 3 large onions

Boil above mixture together and let it cool to lukewarm. Fill an ice cream bucket about 3/4 full of washed, slice cukes.

(Slice like bread and butter pickles)

Onion slices are optional for added flavor.  Pour lukewarm  mixture over them, cover and refrigerate.

Stir occasionally.

The cukes will sink down into the juice. These are ready to eat within 1 or 2 days. Must be kept in the fridge.

1cucumber.jpg

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anonymous  July 10, 2007 5:43 PM

Dill Pickles

  • 6 lbs. 3-4" long pickling cucumbers
  • 4 1/2 cups white vinegar
  • 10 cups water
  • 2/3 cups pickling salt
  • 16 cloves garlic, peeled and halved
  • 8 sprigs fresh dill weed
  • 8 heads of dill weed

Wash cucumbers and place in the sink with cold water. Refresh. Sterilize 8 (1 qt.) cannings jars and lids in boiling water for at least 10 minutes.

In a large pots over medium-high heat, combine the vinegar, water and pickling salt. Bring the brine to a rapid boil.

In each jar, place 2 half-cloves of garlic, one head of dill, then enough cucumbers to fill the jar (about 1 lb.). Then add 2 more garlic halves, and 1 sprig of dill. Fill jars with hot brine. Seal jars, making sure you have cleaned the jar's rims of any residue.

Process sealed jars in a boiling water bath. Process quart jars for 15 minutes.

Store pickles for a minimum of 8 weeks before eating. Refrigerate after opening. Pickles will keep for up to 2 years if stored in a cool, dry place.

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anonymous  July 06, 2007 4:18 AM

PEPPER JELLY
Source: Ball "Blue Book"

7 sweet green bell peppers
1 jalapeno pepper
1 1/2 c. vinegar, divided
1 1/2 c. apple juice
1 package powdered pectin
1/2 tsp. salt
5 c. sugar
green food coloring, optional

Wash peppers, remove stems and seeds, cut into 1/2 inch pieces (suggest wearing rubber gloves while handling jalapeno, juices can "seep" into skin and resist washing out right away; OUCH if you rub your nose or eye -- I speak from experience!)

Puree half of peppers and 3/4 cup vinegar in blender or food processor, pour into large bowl. Puree remaining peppers and vinegar and add to other. Stir in apple juice. Cover and refrigerate overnight. Strain pureed mixture through damp jelly bag or several layers of cheesecloth. Measure 4 cups juice, adding additional apple juice if needed to make 4 cups.

Combine juice, pectin, and salt in large saucepan. Bring to boil over high heat, stirring constantly. Add sugar, stirring until dissolved. Return to rolling boil and boil hard 1 minute, again stirring. Remove from heat, skimming foam if needed. Add a few drops of food coloring if desired. Ladle hot jelly into hot, sterilized half pint jars, leaving 1/4 inch head space. Wipe jar lids and adjust two piece lids.

Process 5 minutes (or longer if altitude adjustment is needed) in boiling water canner. Yield: about 6 half pints.

NOTE: Can substitute sweet red peppers and red food coloring.

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anonymous  July 03, 2007 2:03 PM

Making juice for jelly: Wash and drain fruit. Prick or crush the
fruit. Add water if fruit is not juicy enough eg. apples. Add enough
to the kettle that you can see it through the fruit but the fruit is
not floating. Cook uncovered until the fruit is soft and loosing its
color. Have ready a jelly bag [several layers of cheese cloth] . Wet
it, wring it out and line a strainer with it. Let the juice drip
through without squeezing it as this muddies and flavors the jelly.
This juice can be kept up to 6 months before proceeding by freezing
or canning it.

Making jelly: Measure the strained juice and put it in an enamel or
stainless steel pan. Simmer 5 min. Skim off froth. Measure and warm
sugar in a pan in the oven and add it. Stir until dissolved. Cook at
a gentle simmer until the point of jelling. To test, place a small
amount of jelly on a spoon, cool it slightly and let it drop back
into the pot from the side of the spoon. As the syrup thickens, 2
large drops will form along the edge of the spoon. when these two
drops run together and fall as a single drop the "sheeting" stage has
been reached- 220 to 222 deg F and the jelly will be firm when
cooled. It can take anywhere from 10 to 30 min for jelly to reach
this stage depending on the fruit and the amount of sugar. Take the
jars from the sterilizing bath and invert on a cake cooler. They
should be hot but dry when filled. Fill to 1/4" from the top. Cover
with melted paraffin 1/8" deep.
 [report anonymous abuse]
 
anonymous  July 03, 2007 1:58 PM

About Jams Jellies & Preserves

The less sugar you use the greater the flavor impact of the fruit. If
honey is used there will be a flavor change and the jellies/jams must
be cooked longer. If you use artificial sweeteners use only the
Cyclamate type to avoid bitterness and follow the manufacturer's
instructions. Cooked down jellies in which the juice is extracted by
the open kettle method contain 60% fruit versus commercial products
[pressure cooked to extract more juice but pectin destroying] with
only 45%

Jelly: has great clarity from dripping the cooked fruit through a
cloth before adding sugar and finishing.

Jams, Butter and Pastes: are whole fruit purees of increasing density.

Marmalades, Preserves and Conserves: are bits of fruit in a heavy
syrup.

High Pectin Fruits: Apples, Crabapples, Quinces, Red Currants,
Gooseberries, Plums and Cranberries. These need no additional pectin.
If you get syrupy jelly you used too much sugar or did not cook the
juice long enough after adding the sugar.

Low Pectin Fruits: Strawberries, Blueberries, Peaches, Apricots,
Cherries, Pears, Blackberries, Raspberries, Grapes, Pineapple and
Rhubarb. These require combining with high pectin fruits or adding a
commercial pectin.

To Test Pectin Content: Put 1 tbl cooled fruit juice in a glass. Add
an equal amount of grain alcohol and shake gently. The alcohol will
bring the pectin together in a gel. If a large amount of pectin is
present it will appear in a single mass or clot when poured from the
glass. Use equal amounts of juice and sugar. If the pectin collects
in several small particles use have as much sugar as juice.

To sterilize jelly glasses: fill jars 3/4 full of water and place
them in a shallow pan partly filled with water. Simmer 15 min and
then keep hot until filled. If the lids are placed on the steaming
jars they will be sterilized simultaneously.

Tips: -Use enamel or stainless steel pots not aluminum or copper.
-On average, use 3/4 c sugar to 1 c fruit or juice depending on
pectin content[see above].
-Very acid fruits can tolerate a whole c of sugar.
-Sterilize jars and seal tightly.
-For fruit that tends to discolor add lemon juice or Ascorbic
acid.
-Keep in a cool dark place but do not refrigerate.

Making Jam: is easiest and most economical as it needs only one
cooking step and uses the pulp. Measure the fruit. In putting it in
the pan, crush the lower layers to provide moisture until more is
drawn out by cooking or add a little water. Simmer the fruit until it
is soft. Add sugar and stir until dissolved. Bring to a boil,
stirring to avoid sticking. Reduce heat and cook until thickened- up
to 1/2 hr.

Making Preserves and Conserves: Place fruit in a pot with an equal
amount of sugar in layers ending with sugar on top and allow to rest
overnight. Bring slowly to a boil and simmer until fruit is
translucent. Drain fruit and put in sterile jars. Simmer syrup longer
if necessary to thicken it and pour over fruit. Seal and store.
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anonymous  June 28, 2007 7:55 PM

Bread and Butter Pickles

1 ga Thin sliced cucumbers
6 Medium onions
3 cl Garlic
1/3 c Canning salt
2 tb Whole mustard seed
1 1/2 ts Celery seed
3 c White vinegar
5 c Sugar
1 1/2 ts Tumeric

Mix thin sliced cucumbers and onions and garlic with salt. Cover with ice and let sit for 3 hours. Then drain and add remaining ingredients. Bring to a boil and can in sterile pint jars.

 [report anonymous abuse]
 
anonymous  June 22, 2007 5:10 AM

Sweet Cherry Jam:Wash, pit and finely chop enough cherries to equal 4 1/2 cups. The chopping can be done in a food processor. Put cherries into saucepan and add 6 1/4 cups sugar. Bring the mixture to a full rolling boil and add 1 package of powdered pectin. Return to a rolling boil, and boil 1 minute longer. Remove from heat and skim off any foam with a spoon. Ladle into sterilized canning jars filling to within 1/8 inch of tops. Wipe jar rims and threads. Cover with flat lids then screw bands tightly. Process in a water bath for 10 minutes.  [report anonymous abuse]
 
anonymous  May 30, 2007 5:40 PM

Jalapeno Jelly

Ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup jalapeno peppers
  • 2 medium green bell peppers, seeded & sliced
  • 6 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 1/2 cup distilled white vinegar
  • 6 ounces bottle liquid pectin
  • 1 tablespoon dried red pepper flakes
  • green food coloring, (optional)

Place jalapeno peppers, green peppers, and vinegar in bowl of food processor. Using metal blade and quick on and off turns, finely grind peppers. Scrape peppers mixture into heavy saucepan. Stir in sugar. Cook over high heat, stirring constantly, until liquid comes to a full, rolling boil. Boil for 10 minutes. Remove from heat. Stir in liquid pectin, red pepper flakes, and 2-3 drops food coloring, if desired. Immediately pour into hot sterilized jars and vacuum seal. Hot water bath method, or may be refrigerated up to 6 weeks.

 [report anonymous abuse]
 
pickled okra May 27, 2007 4:00 AM

Pickled Okra
10 pints small okra (about 4 pounds)
3/4 cup salt
8 cups vinegar
1 cup water
10 red or green hot peppers
10 cloves garlic
dill weed or seed if desired

Boil 10 pints canning jars for 15 minutes. Leave in hot water until ready to use. Wash okra, place in hot jars. Place 1 clove of garlic, 1 teaspoon dill and 1 pepper in each jar. Heat vinegar, salt, and water to boiling. Pour into each jar covering okra. Remove air bubbles, wipe sealing edges, and close with new jar lids following manufacturer's instructions.
Process in boiling water bath for 5 minutes. Remove from water, cool. Store for one month before using to develop flavor.
 [ send green star]
 
anonymous Penny...that is a winner...what a combination May 16, 2007 4:57 PM

Beetroot PickleMakes four 1lb. (450g) jars
Description/Notes:

A spicy beetroot pickle that is an ideal accompaniment to cold meat

Ingredients:
  • 6 medium beetroot, cooked, skinned and thinly sliced
  • juice of one lemon
  • 3 large onions
  • half a pint (285ml) water
  • 2 tsp. dill seed
  • 10 oz. 9275g) caster sugar
  • 1 lb. (450g) cooking apples
  • half a tsp. salt
  • 1 rounded tbsp. ground mustard
  • 12 fl. oz. (340 ml) red wine vinegar

  • Cooking Instructions:
    1. Peel and core the apples then slice them
    2. Peel and thinly slice the onions
    3. Put the apples in a pan, cover with water then add the lemon juice
    4. Simmer gently for about 5 minutes until the apples are just soft then drain from pan
    5. Place the sliced beetroot, onions, dill and apples in warmed wide necked jars
    6. Bring the water and vinegar to the boil then remove from heat
    7. Add a little water to the mustard and mix to form a paste then add the salt and sugar
    8. Add the mustard mixture to the vinegar and water and bring to the boil
    9. Pour onto the jars while still hot
    10. Secure the jars tightly
     [report anonymous abuse]
     
    Chocolate Raspberry Jam recipe May 15, 2007 3:08 AM

    Chocolate Raspberry Jam recipe

    6 cups prepared fruit (about 7 pints fresh raspberries)
    3 squares unsweetened chocolate
    4 cups granulated sugar
    1 box Sure Jel (for lower sugar recipes pectin)
    1/2 teaspoon margarine or butter

    Crush berries thoroughly, 1 cup at a time. If using frozen berries, use both liquid and solids; they all were part of the original fresh berry. (Sieve 1/2 of the pulp to remove some seeds if desired. You can sieve it all if preparing for those with dental problems. Removing seeds causes waste, so be sure you have enough berries.) Measure 6 cups of crushed fruit into 6- or 8-quart heavy saucepan. Break the chocolate squares into smaller pieces and add them to saucepan.

    Measure sugar into separate bowl. Mix 1/4 cup sugar from measured amount with pectin in small bowl. Stir pectin-sugar mixture into fruit in saucepan. Add butter. Bring quickly to full rolling boil and boil exactly 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Skim foam and ladle into pint or half-pint jars, leaving 1/4-inch headspace and process 10 minutes in boiling water canner.

    http://www.recipegoldmine.com/canfruit/canning258.html

     [ send green star]
     
    anonymous  May 14, 2007 8:24 PM

    TRADITIONAL STRAWBERRY JAM (COOKED)

    Type of Recipe: Other

    Difficulty: Easy

    List of Ingredients:
    5 cups crushed berries (start with 2 qts. whole berries)
    7 cups sugar
    1 box powdered fruit pectin

    Directions:
    Stir powdered pectin into the berries. Bring berries and pectin to a boil and add sugar all at once. Again, bring the mixture to a boil for one minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat and fill jars.

     [report anonymous abuse]
     
    anonymous Sweet cherry and lemon conserve April 26, 2007 7:28 PM

    Editor's note: This recipe is adapted from Justin Rashid of American Spoon Foods in Petoskey, Michigan.

    To read more about Rashid and the northwestern Michigan cherry harvest, click here.

    "In northwestern Michigan, we have more cherries than we know what to do with, so everyone cans to preserve the summer harvest," says Rashid. "I usually make this conserve with our local Schmidts, which are very black and sweet. But regular Bings, or any sweet variety, can be substituted. Be sure they're ripe, but not overripe — plump, glossy, and firm."

    The conserve is great on toast, croissants, or biscuits, or with bagels and cream cheese. It can even be thinned with a little red wine and used to glaze a roasted duck.

    serving size

    Makes two 8-ounce jars.

    ingredients1 quart fresh dark cherries
    1 medium lemon
    1 1/2 cups sugar

    Two clean, sterilized 8-ounce canning jars with two-piece screw lids

    preparationPlace a clean plate in your freezer.

    Pit and halve cherries, reserving juice. Cherries and juice together should make about 3 packed cups.

    Juice the lemon. You should have about 3 tablespoons. Cut membrane away from lemon peel and discard membrane. Slice peel (zest and pith) very finely — slices should be approximately 1/16-inch thick and 3/4-inch long. You should have about 1/2 cup peel.

    Combine cherries and their juice, lemon juice, peel, and sugar in a nonreactive bowl. Stir, and let stand at room temperature 1 hour.

    Pour mixture into a large, heavy-bottomed saucepan or preserving kettle. (To allow space for foaming as mixture boils, ingredients should take up no more than 1/3 of volume of saucepan.)

    Bring mixture to boil over medium heat. Boil, uncovered, 15 minutes, stirring frequently with a wooden spoon to minimize foaming.

    When reduced by almost half (foam will disappear and small, clear bubbles will form), remove plate from freezer and place a teaspoon of conserve on surface of plate. Allow to cool 1 minute, then test consistency with your finger, and taste. If conserve has a thick, syrupy consistency, it's done. If it doesn't, boil for a few minutes more and repeat cold plate test, continuing until desired consistency is achieved.

    Immediately after turning off heat, use a ladle and funnel to carefully fill canning jars with hot conserve. Wip lip of each jar to remove any stickiness. Top with lids and screw bands, then use pot holder or dry kitchen towel to hold jars while twisting screw bands closed.

    Immediately invert jars and place them upside-down on counter. After five minutes, return jars to right-side up. Allow to cool and thicken overnight.

    Note: For safety, if you plan to keep the jars unrefrigerated, click here for instructions on processing them in a boiling-water canner after filling.

     [report anonymous abuse]
     
    anonymous  April 22, 2007 6:55 PM

    DILLY BEANS 

    2 lbs green beans
    1/4-1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper or Tabasco sauce (according to your heat preference)
    2 cloves garlic, whole and peeled
    1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds (optional)
    1 head dill (or 1/2 tsp. dill weed)
    5 cups distilled vinegar
    1/2 cup pickling salt
    5 cups water

    Prepare jars for canning. Wash and trim beans at ends. Do not snap beans.

    Bring vinegar, salt and water to a boil.

    In the bottom each hot sterilized jar, put the garlic cloves, mustard seed, and dill.

    Pack jars with fresh green beans, packed lengthwise.

    Do not snap beans.

    Process for 20 minutes at 1000' altitude, or adjust time according to your altitude.

    6 Pints.

     [report anonymous abuse]
     
    peach tea jelly April 19, 2007 4:27 AM

    Peach Tea Jelly


    Ingredients
    2 1/2 cups water 
    6 tea bags, peach flavored 
    1 cup unsweetened white grape juice 
    2 tablespoons lemon juice 
    1 package Ball 100% Natural® Fruit Jell® Pectin 
    3 cups sugar 


    Instructions
    Prepare Ball® and Kerr® jars and closures according to instructions found in Canning Basics.

    Combine water and peach flavored tea bags in a medium saucepan. Bring to a boil; boil 2 minutes. Remove from heat and let

    stand 5 minutes. Remove tea bags and measure 2 cups tea. Place tea in a 6- or 8-quart saucepot. Add white grape juice and

    lemon juice. Gradually stir in pectin. Bring mixture to a full boil over high heat, stirring constantly. Add entire measure of sugar,

    stirring to dissolve. Return mixture to a full, rolling boil and boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Skim

    foam if necessary. Ladle hot jelly into hot jars, leaving 1/4-inch headspace. Wipe rim and threads of jar with a clean damp

    cloth. Place lid on jar with sealing compound next to glass. Screw band down evenly and firmly just until a point of resistance

    is met-fingertip tight.

    Process 10 minutes in a boiling-water canner.
    Yield: about 4 half-pints.

    For altitude adjustment, increase processing as indicated below.
    1,001-- 3,000 ft....5 minutes
    3,001-- 6,000 ft...10 minutes
    6,001-- 8,000 ft...15 minutes
    8,001- 10,000 ft...20 minutes

    http://www.homecanning.com/usa/ALRecipes.asp?R=755

     [ send green star]

     
    anonymous  April 17, 2007 6:53 PM

    Preserving Food for Special DietsJams and Jellies

    Jams and jellies are made by cooking crushed fruit or fruit juice with sugar. Sugar must be present in the proper proportions with pectin and acid to form a gel. Sugar preserves the product, helping to prevent the growth of microorganisms. Products without sugar, with reduced sugar, or with artificial sweeteners cannot be made by leaving the sugar out of regular jam and jelly recipes.

    Jams and jellies without added sugar can be made in the following ways:

    1. Regular pectin with special recipes--These special recipes have been formulated so no added sugar is needed. However, each package of regular pectin does contain some sugar. Artificial sweetener is often added.

    2. Special modified pectins--These pectins are not the same as regular pectin. They will say "light" or "less sugar" on the label. Follow the directions on the package. Some products are made with less sugar and some with artificial sweeteners.

    3. Recipes using gelatin-- Some recipes use unflavored gelatin as the thickener for the jam or jelly. Artificial sweetener is often added.

    4. Long-boil methods--Boiling fruit pulp for extended periods of time will make a product thicken and resemble a jam, preserve, or fruit butter. Artificial sweetener may be added.

    Because these products do no have sugar as a preservative, be sure to process or store them as directed. Some require longer processing in a boiling water bath while some require refrigeration.

    Apple or Grape Jelly with Gelatin

    4 teaspoons unflavored gelatin
    2 cups unsweetened apple juice or 3 cups unsweetened grape juice
    2 Tablespoons liquid sweetener*
    1 1/2 Tablespoons lemon juice
    Food coloring, if desired

    Yields 1 pint

    Soften gelatin in 1/2 cup of juice. Bring remaining 1 1/2 cups juice to a boil, then remove from heat. Add softened gelatin, stirring to dissolve. Add liquid sweetener, lemon juice, and coloring. Bring to a full, rolling boil. Ladle into clean jars and seal. Keep in refrigerator. 1 Tablespoon = 9 calories.

    *Note: 1/8 teaspoon of liquid sweetener equals the sweetening power of 1 teaspoon of sugar. If other forms of sweeteners are used, substitute on an equivalent sweetening basis. Aspartame sweeteners may not be successful because they are affected by heat. If used, add aspartame sweeteners after mixture is heated.

     [report anonymous abuse]
     
    anonymous  April 17, 2007 6:51 PM

    Preserving Food for Special DietsHYG-5352-97

    Preserving foods to meet special dietary needs can be done easily in the home. The cost of commercially prepared food suitable for those on special diets is costly because the quantity handled is small and production procedures are slightly different than conventionally canned foods. Preserving food at home can be a practical way to save money if fresh produce and the necessary equipment are available.

    Reduced-Salt DietsCanning

    Salt can be safely omitted from home canned vegetables, meats, poultry, and fish. Salt is used as a flavor enhancer rather than a preservative in canning if the recipe calls for only 1-3 teaspoons per pint or quart of food. Use the same process times as for conventionally canned foods (vegetables, meats, poultry, fish). If using a salt substitute, add it when serving the product; an unpleasant aftertaste can develop from the canning process if salt is added before canning.

    Pickling

    Salt concentrations should not be changed in pickle recipes. Reduced-sodium salts such as "Lite Salt" may be used in quick process pickle recipes. However, the pickles may have a slightly different taste than expected. Never alter salt concentrations or use reduced-sodium salt when making fermented pickles or sauerkraut. Proper fermentation depends on correct proportions of salt and other ingredients.

    Reduced-Sodium Sliced Sweet Pickles

    Brining soluntion
    4 pounds (3- to 4-inch) pickling cucumbers
    1 quart distilled white vinegar (5 percent)
    1 Tablespoon canning or pickling salt
    1 Tablespoon mustard seed
    1/2 cup sugar
    Canning Solution
    1 2/3 cups distilled white vinegar (5 percent)
    3 cups sugar
    1 Tablespoon whole allspice
    2 1/4 teaspoon celery seed

    Yields 4 to 5 pints

    Wash cucumbers and cut 1/16 inch off blossom end and discard. Cut cucumbers into 1/4 inch slices. Combine all ingredients for canning syrup in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Keep syrup hot until used. In a large kettle, mix the ingredients for brining solution. Add the cut cucumbers, cover, and simmer until cucumbers change color from bright to dull green (about 5 to 7 minutes). Drain the cucumber slices. Fill pint jars, and cover with hot canning syrup; remove air bubbles, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process pint jars for 10 minutes in a boiling water bath canner (at altitudes of 1,001-6,000 feet, increase process time to 15 minutes).

    Freezing

    Foods frozen at home typically have no salt added during preparation, making them an excellent choice for reduced-sodium diets. Add salt or reduced sodium salts at serving time, if desired.

    Reduced-Sugar Diets (for a Diabetic Diet)

    Granulated table sugar (sucrose) is the most frequently used sweetener in canning and freezing. Sugar helps preserve the color, texture, and flavor of the food, but is optional. The sugar in jams and jellies helps the gel to form, increases the flavor, and, in the large amount called for, acts as a preservative. Honey, corn syrup, and brown sugar can be used as substitutes for granulated sugar; however these alternatives do not reduce calories and cannot be used for a diabetic diet.

    Canning

    Fruit can be safely canned without sugar for the diabetic or reduced-calorie diet. Sugar is generally added to canned fruit to improve flavor, help stabilize color, and retain the shape of the fruit. Sugar does not act as a preservative in canned fruit. Fruit canned without added sugar will be somewhat softer than a similar product packed in syrup. Flavor changes and loss of color may also be expected. The fruit still contains natural sugars, which must be considered in the diabetic diet. To can fruit without added sugar, try some of the following options:

    • Crush or slice some of the fruit and can it in its own juice.

    • Extract juice from other fruit, preferably from a mild-flavored fruit.

    • Use water as the packing liquid.

    Artificial sweeteners such as saccharine or aspartame should be added just before serving. Bitterness and off-flavors develop when saccharine is used in canning.

    Freezing

    Fruits can be frozen without added sugar because sugar is not used as a preservative. It does, however, help maintain flavor, color, and texture. Plan to use frozen fruit within one year for best quality. Serve fruit before it is completely thawed. This is especially important for fruit frozen without sugar.

    Sugar substitutes may be used in place of sugar. Labels on the products give the equivalents to a standard amount of sugar. Follow the directions to determine the amount of sweetener needed. Artificial sweeteners give a sweet flavor but do not furnish beneficial effects of sugar, such as thickness of syrup and color protection.



    This post was modified from its original form on 17 Apr, 18:52  [report anonymous abuse]
     
    pear honey April 12, 2007 4:32 AM

    Pear Honey

    Original recipe yield: 4 pints

    PREP TIME  45 Min COOK TIME  3 Hrs  READY IN  3 Hrs 45 Min

    INGREDIENTS
    8 cups peeled, cored and chopped pears
    1 cup unsweetened pineapple juice
    8 cups white sugar

    DIRECTIONS
    Place chopped pears into a large pot, and pour pineapple juice over them to prevent them from browning. Stir in sugar, and

    bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Stir frequently to prevent scorching. When the pears are at a full boil, reduce heat to

    medium, and cook until the mixture is the color and texture of honey. The longer you cook it, the thicker it gets. Cooking time

    is usually 2 to 3 hours.

    Ladle into hot sterile jars, filling to within 1/4 inch of the top. Wipe rims with a clean damp cloth, and seal jars with lids and

    rings. Process in a boiling water canner for 10 minutes, or the amount of time recommended by your local extension for your

    area.

    NUTRITION INFORMATION
    Servings Per Recipe: 64

    Amount Per Serving

    Calories: 111

    Total Fat: 0.1g
    Cholesterol: 0mg
    Sodium: < 1mg
    Total Carbs: 28.6g
        Dietary Fiber: 0.5g
    Protein: 0.1g


     [ send green star]
     
    pickled corn on the cob April 12, 2007 4:27 AM

    Pickled Corn on the Cob

    Original recipe yield: 2 quarts

    PREP TIME  15 Min COOK TIME  15 Min READY IN  30 Min

    INGREDIENTS
    6 ears corn - husked, cleaned and quartered
    1 tablespoon salt
    3 cups white vinegar
    1 cup white sugar
    1 tablespoon pickling spice
    2 bay leaves
    1 (3 inch) cinnamon stick

    DIRECTIONS
    Rinse the corn, and place in a large bowl with the salt and enough water to cover. Refrigerate until needed. Sterilize two

    1quart jars in simmering water for 5 minutes.

    In a large stock pot, stir together the vinegar, sugar and pickling spice. Add the bay leaves and cinnamon stick. Bring to a boil

    over medium heat, stirring occasionally to be sure the sugar has dissolved.

    Drain and rinse the corn under cold water. Add to the pot with the pickling mixture. Return to a boil, reduce heat to low, and

    simmer for 10 minutes. Remove corn with a slotted spoon, and fill the sterile jars. Remove the cinnamon stick and bay leaves

    from the liquid, and discard. Fill the jars of corn with the vinegar mixture to within 1/2 inch of the top. The corn should be

    completely covered. Wipe the rims of the jars with a clean cloth. Seal with lids and rings.

    Process the jars in a hot water bath for the time recommended by your local extension in your area. Most areas require about

    10 minutes in a water bath of 180 degrees F (82 degrees C). Refrigerate after opening.

    NUTRITION INFORMATION
    Servings Per Recipe: 12

    Amount Per Serving

    Calories: 106

    Total Fat: 0.5g
    Cholesterol: 0mg
    Sodium: 588mg
    Total Carbs: 25.7g
        Dietary Fiber: 1.4g
    Protein: 1.5g


     [ send green star]
     
    Cinnamon Plum Jam April 12, 2007 4:22 AM

    Cinnamon Plum Jam

    Original recipe yield: 56 servings

    PREP TIME  15 Min COOK TIME  10 Min READY IN  25 Min

    INGREDIENTS
    7 cups sugar
    5 cups coarsely ground peeled plums
    1/2 cup water
    1/3 cup lemon juice
    1 (1.75 ounce) package powdered fruit pectin
    1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

    DIRECTIONS
    In a large kettle, combine sugars, plums, water and lemon juice. Bring to a full rolling boil, stirring constantly. Stir in pectin;

    return to a full rolling boil. Boil 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from the heat; stir in cinnamon. Skim off foam. Pour hot

    jam into hot jars, leaving 1/4-in. headspace. Adjust caps. Process for 10 minutes in a boiling-water bath

     [ send green star]
     
     April 12, 2007 4:14 AM

    Thanks Marty, love any spiced jellies & jams, gives it an extra kick!  [ send green star]
     
    anonymous  April 11, 2007 12:18 PM

    Spiced Concord Grape Jelly
    This type of jelly is sometimes called venison jelly because it is served with venison meat.
    Makes 4 half pints

    3 or 31/2 pounds (2 quarts) Concord grapes
    2 cinnamon sticks
    10 allspice berries
    3 cup sugar
    4 sterilized 1/2 pint canning jars with lids and rings


    1. Stem and wash grapes, discarding any that are withered or blemished. Put them in a 4- to 6-quart stainless steel pot; mash them with a potato masher, extracting as mush juice as possible. Cook mixture over medium heat until it comes to a boil. Simmer, stirring, 10 minutes.

    2. Strain through strainer. You should have 4 cups. Return juice to the same kettle. Add cinnamon sticks and allspice berries. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat and add sugar. Boil, stirring, for 20 minutes. To test for jelling, put a teaspoonful in a dish and put the dish in the freezer for a minute. If the jelly wrinkles when gently pushed with a finger, it's ready.

    3. Strain to remove cinnamon sticks and allspice berries. Pack into hot sterilized jars. Label and date. Store in the refrigerator up to 6 months.

    Cooking Tip
    You'll notice that unlike some jelly recipes, this one has no added pectin, the substance that helps to create jelling. That's because Concord grapes are naturally high in pectin.

     [report anonymous abuse]
     
    anonymous  April 05, 2007 7:10 AM

    I love apple butter...thanks!!!  [report anonymous abuse]
     
    marinated peppers April 05, 2007 3:15 AM

    MARINATED PEPPERS

    Bell, Hungarian, banana, or jalapeno

    4 lbs. firm peppers*
    1 cup bottled lemon juice
    2 cups white vinegar (5%)
    1 tbsp oregano leaves
    1 cup olive or salad oil
    1/2 cup chopped onions
    2 cloves garlic, quartered (optional)
    2 tbsp prepared horseradish (optional)

    * Note: It is possible to adjust the intensity of pickled jalapeno
    peppers by using all hot jalapeno peppers (hot style), or blending
    with sweet and mild peppers (medium or mild style).

    For hot style: Use 4 lbs jalapeno peppers.

    For medium style: Use 2 lbs jalapeno peppers and 2 lb sweet and mild
    peppers.

    For mild style: Use 1 lb jalapeno peppers and 3 lbs sweet and mild
    peppers.

    YIELD: About 9 half-pints

    PROCEDURE: Select your favorite pepper. CAUTION: IF YOU SELECT HOT
    PEPPERS, WEAR RUBBER OR PLASTIC GLOVES WHILE HANDLING THEM OR WASH
    HANDS THOROUGHLY WITH SOAP AND WATER BEFORE TOUCHING YOUR FACE.
    Peppers may be left whole. Large peppers may be quartered. Wash,
    slash two to four slits in each pepper, and blanch in boiling water
    or blister in order to peel tough-skinned hot peppers.

    Peppers may be blistered using one of the following methods: Oven or
    broiler method: Place peppers in a hot oven (400 degrees F) or
    broiler for 6-8 minutes or until skins blister. Range-top method:
    Cover hot burner, either gas or electric, with heavy white mesh.
    Place peppers on burner for several minutes until skins blister.

    Allow peppers to cool. Place in pan and cover with a damp cloth. This
    will make peeling the peppers easier. After several minutes of
    cooling, peel each pepper. Flatten whole peppers. Mix all remaining
    ingredients in a saucepan and heat to boiling. Place 1/4 garlic clove
    (optional) and 1/4 teaspoon salt in each half pint of 1/2 teaspoon
    per pint. Fill jars with peppers, add hot, well-mixed oil/pickling
    solution over peppers, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Wipe rims and
    threads clean with a clean damp cloth. Apply lids that have been
    treated according to manufacturer's directions. Process in a
    simmering hot water bath at 170 to 180 degrees F.

    Recommended process time for MARINATED PEPPERS in a boiling-water
    canner half pints or pints, 15 minutes.


     [ send green star]
     
    hot pickled cherry tomatoes April 05, 2007 3:12 AM

    Fireballs: Hot pickled cherry tomatoes

    14 lbs small green cherry tomatoes
    4 cloves garlic
    4 stalks celery
    4 hot red peppers
    4 heads dill
    1 quart water
    1/2 cup pickling salt
    2 quarts white vinegar
    1. Pack about 3 1/2 pounds of the tomatoes per quart jar.
    2. To each quart then add a garlic clove, a celery stalk, a hot red
    pepper and a head of dill.
    3. Combine water, salt and vinegar.
    4. Bring to a boil.
    5. Fill jars to 1/2-inch from top.
    6. Process 10 minutes in boiling water bath.

     [ send green star]
     
    apple butter April 05, 2007 3:08 AM

    Apple Butter

    Use Jonathan, Winesap, Black Twig, Stayman, Golden Delicious,
    Macintosh or other tasty apple varieties for good results.

    8 pounds apples
    2 cups cider
    2 cups vinegar
    2-1/4 cups white sugar
    2-1/4 cups packed brown sugar
    2 tablespoons ground cinnamon
    1 tablespoon ground cloves

    Yield: About 8 to 9 pints

    Procedure: Wash, remove stems, quarter, and core fruit. Cook slowly
    in cider and vinegar until soft. Press fruit through a colander, food
    mill or strainer. Cook fruit pulp with sugar and spices, stirring
    frequently. To test for doneness, remove a spoonful and hold it away
    from steam for two minutes. It is done if the butter remains mounded
    on the spoon. Another way to determine when the butter is cooked
    adequately is to spoon a small quantity onto a plate. When a rim of
    liquid does not separate around the edge of the butter, it is ready
    for canning. Fill hot into sterile half-pint or pint jars, leaving
    1/4-inch headspace. Quart jars need not be presterilized.

     [ send green star]
     
    anonymous  April 04, 2007 8:31 PM

    The recipe below is called Strawberry Freezer Jam  [report anonymous abuse]
     
    anonymous  April 04, 2007 8:29 PM

    Comments:
    Because this jam is not cooked, it must be stored in the freezer and can be used for up to one year. Just take a jar out of the freezer, thaw in refrigerator and use. If using some of the jam right away, store in the refrigerator for up to 3 weeks, after that it must be thrown out. Once you have opened a jar, refrigerate and use within 3 weeks.

    Ingredients:
    5 cups fresh strawberries, stems removed
    4 cups granulated sugar
    3/4 cup water
    1 package (1 3/4 ounces) powdered fruit pectin

    Instructions:
    Crush strawberries completely. Measure 2 cups strawberries with juices into bowl. Thoroughly mix in sugar; set aside 10 minutes. Combine water and pectin in saucepan. Bring to boil and boil one minute, stirring constantly. Stir pectin mixture into strawberries; continue stirring 3 minutes. Ladle quickly into sterilized freezer jars or containers, allowing 1/2 inch head space. Cover lids. Let stand at room temperature 24 hours. Store in freezer for up to one year, or if jam is to be used with 2 or 3 weeks, store in refrigerator.

    Makes: 2 1/2 cups



    This post was modified from its original form on 04 Apr, 20:30  [report anonymous abuse]
     
    anonymous  March 28, 2007 9:57 AM

    Chili Vinegar Dipping Sauce 


    ingredientsFor chile vinegar
    5 ounces small (2- to 3-inch) fresh hot red or green chiles such as serrano or Thai (about 20), rinsed and patted dry
    1 1/3 cups distilled white vinegar

    To make dipping sauce
    6 tablespoons water
    4 teaspoons sugar
    1/2 teaspoon dried hot red-pepper flakes (optional)

    Special equipment: a 1-pt canning jar with lid and screw band; an instant-read thermometer
    preparationSterilize jar and lid:
    Wash jar, lid, and screw band in hot soapy water, then rinse well. Dry screw band. Put empty jar on a rack in a boiling-water canner or a deep 5- to 6-quart pot and add enough hot water to cover by 2 inches. Bring to a boil, covered, then boil 10 minutes. Remove canner from heat, leaving jar in water. Heat lid in water to cover by 2 inches in a small saucepan until thermometer registers 180°F (do not let boil). Remove from heat. Keep jar and lid submerged in hot water, covered, until ready to use.

    Make chile vinegar:
    Carefully remove jar and lid with tongs, then drain jar upside down on a clean kitchen towel and dry lid.

    Pack chiles into jar. Bring vinegar to a boil in small saucepan, then remove from heat and pour over chiles. Cool to room temperature. Wipe off rim of jar with a dampened clean kitchen towel, then top with lid and firmly screw on screw band. Chill sealed jar 2 weeks.

    Make dipping sauce:
    Bring water and sugar to a boil in a small saucepan, stirring until sugar is dissolved, then stir in red-pepper flakes (if using), 2 tablespoons chile vinegar, and salt to taste. Remove from heat and cool to room temperature.

    Cooks' notes:
    • Chile vinegar keeps, chilled, 6 months.
    • Instead of making your own chile vinegar, you can use the vinegar from bottled pickled jalapeños
     [report anonymous abuse]
     
    anonymous  March 25, 2007 11:40 AM

    Homemade V8 Juice
    Source Sunset 1974
    Yield about 6 quarts.

    15 lb fully ripe tomatoes, chopped
    2 cups celery, chopped
    3 large onions, chopped
    3 garlic cloves, minced/mashed
    1/4 cup sugar; or to taste
    2 tbsp salt
    3/4 tsp pepper
    2 tsp prepared horseradish
    1/3 cup lemon juice
    Worcestershire to taste

    Over medium high heat bring the vegetables to a boil and boil gently for about 20 minutes.

    In a covered blender (food processor) and a portion at a time process until smooth. Strain and discard pulp.

    Add seasonings and bring to just under boiling if canning, or chill and freeze.
     [report anonymous abuse]
     
    anonymous  August 02, 2006 6:13 PM

    CAROLINE'S BEST DILL PICKLES

    2 c. water
    1 1/2 c. white vinegar or cider vinegar
    2 tbsp. pickling salt
    2 tbsp. sugar
    Lots of dill
    Garlic cloves, optional

    Boil first 4 ingredients for 5 minutes. Put dill in bottom and top of jars. Pack clean pickles in jar, add 1-2 garlic cloves. Pour boiling brine over, wipe jar rims clean and seal. Put jars in a large kettle or canner, add enough hot water to cover jars. Let set in water until cold before removing.
     [report anonymous abuse]
     
    anonymous  July 28, 2006 10:31 PM

    "Jams and Jellies"


    If you shy away from making jams and jellies because you don't like to cook the mixture a long time or process the jars, let your microwave and freezer simplify the procedure. These fresh- tasting jams and jellies cook quickly in the microwave and stay fresh up to a year when frozen.

    In the microwave, most of these mixtures boil up high, so be sure to use deep containers when specified.

    By storing the jellies in the freezer, you won't have to sterilize the jars or process them in the boiling water bath. Just freeze the spread in traditional jelly jars or plastic containers made for freezer storage.

    FREEZER PLUM JAM
    3 cups peeled, pitted, and mashed fresh plums

    6 cups sugar

    l 3/4-ounce) package powdered pectin

    3/4 cup water

    Combine plums and sugar, stirring well. Let stand 20 minutes, stirring occasionally.

    Combine pectin and water in a 4-cup glass measure, stirring well. Microwave at HIGH 2 to 2 l/2 minutes or until boiling. Boil l minute, stopping and stirring after 45 seconds. Stir well again, and pour pectin mixture over fruit. Stir 3 minutes.

    Pour mixture into jelly jars or frozen food containers. Cover with lids; let stand 4 hours. Freeze jam up to l year, or refrigerate up to 3 weeks. Serve jam at room temperature. Yield: 7 cups.

    QUICK GRAPE JELLY
    2 cups bottled unsweetened grape juice

    3 cups sugar

    l tablespoon lemon juice

    l (3-ounce) package liquid pectin

    Combine first 3 ingredients in a deep 2-quart casserole. Microwave at HIGH 9 to l0 minutes or until mixture comes to a boil, stirring every 3 minutes. Stir in liquid pectin; microwave at HIGH 3 to 3 l/2 minutes. Skim off foam with a metal spoon.

    Pour mixture into jelly jars or frozen food containers. Cover with lids; let stand 4 hours. Freeze jelly up to l year, or refrigerate up to 3 weeks. Serve jelly at room temperature. Yield: 4 cups.

    ORANGE-PINEAPPLE MARMALADE
    2 medium orange

    l (l5 l/4-ounce) can crushed unsweetened pineapple, drained

    4 cups sugar

    2 tablespoons lemon juice

    Wash oranges; cut into quarters. Remove seeds and membranae from each piece. Grind unpeeled fruit in food processor or meat grinder.

    Combine ground fruit and remaining ingredients in a deep 2 l/2-quart casserole. Microwave at HIGH l0 minutes or until mixture comes to a boil, stirring after 6 minutes. Microwave at HIGH 2 to 3 minutes.

    Pour mixture into jelly jars or frozen containers. Cover with lids; let stand 4 hours. Freeze marmalade up to l year, or refrigerate up to 3 weeks. Serve at room temperature. Yield: 4 cups.

    RED PEPPER JELLY
    3 3/4 cups sugar

    l cup minced sweet red pepper

    3/4 cup white vinegar (5% acidity)

    l l/2 teaspoons hot sauce

    l (3-ounce) package liquid pectin

    Combine first 4 ingredients in a deep 2 l/2-quart casserole. Microwave at HIGH 8 minutes, stirring after 6 minutes. Stir in pectin; microwave at HIGH 2 to 2 l/2 minutes. Skim off foam with a metal spoon.

    Pour mixture into jelly jars or frozen food containers. cover with lids; invert l to l l/2 hours to disperse minced pepper. Freeze jelly up to l year, or refrigerate up to 3 weeks. Allow jelly to come to room temperature before serving. Yield: 4 cups.

     [report anonymous abuse]
     
    Bread and Butter Squash Pickles May 20, 2006 10:00 PM

    Ingredients:

    4 Cups of Cucumbers or Squash
    4 Cups of Squash
    2 Cups of Sliced Onions
    4 Bell Peppers (can be mixed red and green)
    2 Cups Vinegar
    3 Cups Sugar
    2 Teaspoons Celery Seeds
    2 Teaspoons Mustard Seeds


    Directions:

    1. Combine cucumbers, squash, onions and peppers and sprinkle with about 3 Teaspoons of salt.

    2. Let set for 1 hour and then drain.

    3. Mix other ingredients and bring to a hard boil.

    4. Add vegetables and bring to boil again.

    5. Fill jars & put in water bath for 10 minutes.
     [ send green star]
     
    anonymous  May 20, 2006 1:41 PM

    Bottled Apricots with VanillaThe recipes and text below is reprinted with permission from Perfect Preserves by Hilaire Walden. If you’re unfamiliar with the boiling-water canning method of preserving foods, you’ll want to check out this book for detailed instructions (do not attempt canning if you don’t have proper instructions).

    Instead of using whole vanilla beans, strips of orange rind or cinnamon sticks can be added to the jars for a different flavor. Or, you could experiment with more exotic spice such as cardamom and star anise.

    About 3 lbs. firm but ripe apricots
    2/3 cup sugar
    1/2 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
    1 2/1 cups water
    2 whole vanilla beans

    Makes About 10 Cups

    1. Immerse the apricots in a pan of gently boiling water for 20 to 30 seconds. Immediately remove the apricots from the water and off their skins using a small sharp knife or your fingers, if they come easily. Leave to cool.

    2. Put the sugar, lemon juice, and water in a saucepan over low heat, stirring, until the sugar has dissolved. Bring to a boil.

    3.; Add the apricots to the syrup, in batches, if necessary, and poach for 10 minutes.

    4. Using a slotted spoon, immediately transfer the apricots to two warm, sterilized 5-cup jars. Slit the vanilla beans lengthwise with a knife and add two halves to each jar.

    5. When all the apricots have been removed from the pan, boil the syrup for 5 minutes. Pour into prepared jars to within 1/2 inch of the top. Swirl the jars to expel any air bubbles and seal them. Process in a boiling water canner.

    6. Store in a cool, dark, dry place for one month before eating. Use within 12-18 months.

    Italian Vegetable PickleWhen neatly packed, these jars of pickles look so satisfyingly impressive on the pantry or cupboard shelf that it makes the troubles and care taken seem worthwhile. But their attractiveness is their downfall, because all too soon someone won’t be able to resist temptation and will delve indiscriminately into a jar to try some of its contents (why is it nearly always from the bottom) and the whole effect will be ruined.

    1/2 lb. zucchini, cut into matchstick strips
    1/2 lb. trimmed fennel, cut into matchstick strips
    3/4 lb. eggplant, cut into matchstick strips
    1 lb. red bell pepper, cut into strips
    1 yellow bell pepper, cut into strips
    2 celery sticks, sliced
    1/3 lb. baby radishes
    1/4 lb. button mushroom, stalks trimmed
    3/4 cup Kosher salt
    7 1/2 cups water
    5 garlic cloves, cut into slivers
    4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
    3 tablespoons walnut oil
    6 1/4 to 8 3/4 cups white wine vinegar
    4 dried chili peppers
    8 small sprigs each of fresh thyme and rosemary
    8 small bay leaves

    Makes About 8 2/3 Cups

    1. Layer the vegetables, except the garlic, in a large, non-metallic bowl, sprinkling with salt between layers. Pour the water over the vegetables. Put a weighted plate on top to keep the vegetables under the water. Leave in a cool place overnight.

    2. The nest day, pour the vegetables into a colander and rinse under cold running water. Drain, and dry thoroughly with a clean cloth. Spread out on another dry, clean cloth and let air-dry completely.

    3. Transfer vegetables to a bowl and mix in the garlic and oils.

    4. Pour a thin layer of vinegar into hot sterilized jars. Divide half the chilis and herbs among the jars. Pack in the vegetables as tightly as possible. When jars are about half filled, add the remaining chilis and herbs. Continue filling he jars.

    5. Pour in enough vinegar to cover the vegetables and come within 1/4 inch of he top of the jars, pressing the vegetables down. Swirl the jars to expel air bubbles and seal. Let cool, then label and store in a cool, dark, dry place for at least one month before eating. Keeps for up to 6 months in a cool, dark, dry place.

     [report anonymous abuse]
     
    anonymous  February 04, 2006 6:10 AM

    Proper Canning Techniques
    It won't be long before we will be enjoying one of summer's greatest pleasures, homegrown vegetables and fruits. Home food preservation is still done by many and is a very rewarding activity. However, there are food safety precautions that must be observed during these processes. Today, we will talk about canning basics.

    Canning does two things. Foods are heated for specified times to kill the ever-present molds, yeasts, and bacteria that cause food spoilage. Heating also destroys food enzymes that continue the ripening process, eventually resulting in spoilage.

    Processing means heating at a specified temperature for a specified time. The temperature is either a boiling-water-bath temperature (212°), or temperatures reached in a pressure canner such as 10 pounds pressure (240°). Processing times and temperatures vary. They are based on the food, jar size, and type of preparation.

    Why do some foods take longer to process? Why can some be processed at boiling-water temperatures while others must be heated under pressure to higher temperatures?

    For example, apple juice is processed for a shorter time than the thicker product, applesauce. Green beans need a higher processing temperature than tomatoes. And okra takes longer to process than green beans although both are processed at the same temperature.

    The temperature at which a food is canned is determined by the amount of acid in the food. In canning, foods are divided into two groups:

    1. High Acid and

      Low Acid.

    High acid foods contain more natural acids. Generally, tomatoes and all fruits except figs are high acid foods. The presence of these natural acids helps prevent growth of some spoilage microorganisms. However, consumers have demanded more low acid table tomatoes, and we recommend adding lemon juice, vinegar, or citric acid to all canned tomato products. This is a prevention method for the deadly Clostridium botulinum bacteria.

    If the food product has a high enough acid level, boiling-water temperatures are high enough to destroy spoilage organisms.

    Low acid foods, such as vegetables and meat products, contain very little natural acid. They must be processed at higher than boiling-water temperatures to destroy any Clostridium botulinum bacteria. Water boils at 212 degrees F, at sea level, and at a lower temperature at higher elevations. Turning up the temperature under the pot or letting the water boil for a long time does not raise the temperature of the water above its boiling point. To make water boil at a higher temperature, it has to be put under pressure, such as in a pressure canner.

    When a food is processed at 10 pounds pressure, the water boils when it gets to 240°, rather than at 212°. This is high enough to kill the bacteria that causes botulism poisoning.

    Pressure canners must be used to process vegetables, meats, poultry, seafood and soups. Mixed foods that contain both high and low acid foods, are not recommended, but if done, must be processed using the time for the vegetable with the longest pressure canning processing time.

    Every year I get a comment from someone who says they have always canned their green beans in a water bath canner, or that their grandmother always did it that way and no one ever got botulism. And thank goodness! The next batch may have been the one with the deadly toxin. Perhaps a safer canning method was not available to Grandmother, but we benefit from research and technology now and there is no excuse for taking this risk.

    Botulism bacteria are present in soil and water and are found naturally on the surface of fresh foods. Washing removes some of them. So does peeling, shelling, and other preparation steps. However, the final "killer" of botulism bacteria is heating food using the proper method and time. This means boiling-water-bath canning for acid foods and pressure canning for low acid foods.

    Botulism bacteria grow in the absence of air, such as in a vacuum-sealed canned food. If the botulism bacteria haven't been destroyed by proper heating, a sealed jar is a perfect place for them to grow and produce the deadly toxin.

    Canning books contain the precaution: BOIL ALL HOME CANNED VEGETABLES BEFORE TASTING...10 minutes for most vegetables, 20 minutes for corn, spinach and greens. This refers to properly processed vegetables. It doesn't mean you may water-bath-process your green beans and then boil them to make them OK.

    Grandmother was lucky. She got past all the IF'S involved in getting botulism, and you are here to read this article. But there is no reason to take a risk today when proper pressure canning gives you a safe product.  [report anonymous abuse]

     
    anonymous  January 21, 2006 11:58 AM

    Grandma’s Dill Pickles

    11 cups water
    5 cups white vinegar
    1 cup canning salt
    12 pounds pickling cucumbers,
    quartered or halved lengthwise
    9 dill heads
    (Heads are the flowers of fresh dill plants. You can substitute 3 tablespoons of dill seed.)
    18 garlic cloves
    18 small dried hot chili peppers

    In a Dutch oven, bring water, vinegar and salt to a boil; boil for 10 minutes. Pack cucumbers into quart jars within 1⁄4 inch of top. Place one dill head (or 1 teaspoon dill seed), two garlic cloves and two peppers in each jar. Ladle boiling liquid over cucumbers, leaving a quarter-inch headspace. Adjust caps. Process for 10 minutes in a boiling-water bath.

    Yield: 9 quarts

     [report anonymous abuse]
     
    anonymous Wild Plum Butter August 29, 2005 10:27 AM

    Wild Plum Butter

    8 C. pitted and chopped plums
    1 1/2 C. water
    6 C. sugar

    Place plums in a saucepan large enough so that the jam won¹t boil over. Add the water and bring to a boil. Continue boiling 10 minutes. Add sugar and continue boiling until jam is thick and clear, or until it registers 222 degrees to 224 degrees on a candy thermometer. Remove from heat. Skim foam off surface, and pour jam into freshly scrubbed and sterilized half-pint canning jars with sterilized new lids with washed and scalded rings. Wipe the rims and seal, cool jars upright. Label and date. Store upright in a cool, dark, dry place. Makes 8 1/2 pint jars.

     [report anonymous abuse]

     
    anonymous Canning Tomatoes: August 29, 2005 10:26 AM

    Canning Tomatoes:
    Don’t let the lengthy instructions scare you off. It basically boils down to:
    Skin and cut up tomatoes
    Boil tomatoes, and crush
    Put into jars
    Process

    The details are important though, so read on:

    You will need:
    Large kettle, big enough to submerge filled jars in water, with space for water to cover jars
    Rack to sit jars on inside large kettle
    Canning jars, rings and NEW lids (jars and rings are reusable) – pint or quart size
    Large pot to cook tomatoes
    Pot to blanch tomatoes
    Paring knife

    Nice, but not necessary:
    Jar lifter
    Canning funnel

    Instructions:
    Cleanliness is essential to canning! Make sure kitchen area and sinks are clean before beginning!

    1. Fill large pan 2/3 full of water. Put on to boil (for blanching tomatoes)

    2. Examine jars and sealing surfaces for nicks, cracks and sharp edges. Fill canning kettle half full of hot water. Put on to heat.

    3. Wash jars and rings in hot soapy water. Rinse. Leave jars and rings in hot water until needed. Put new lids in saucepan filled with water and place on stove to simmer (or just put into boiling water in a small pan)

    4. Select enough tomatoes for a canner load (hard to estimate, but do your best). Make sure tomatoes are fresh, firm and red ripe (yellow variety works too). Don’t use any with bad spots or mold. Wash carefully and drain.

    5. Put tomatoes into large pan of boiling water (wire basket works well here if you have it). Remove after about 30 seconds or as soon as skin starts to crack. Dip into cold water.

    6. Cut out core, remove skins (which will now slip off easily), and trim any green spots.

    7. Quarter tomatoes, and boil for 5 minutes. Crush tomatoes with potato peeler if want smaller chunks.

    8. Remove one jar from hot water and drain. Place clean jar funnel on jar. Place hot tomatoes in jar.

    9. Remove funnel from jar. Use a non-metallic utensil (spatula handle works well, or handle of wooden spoon), to free air bubbles and let juices settle into spaces. Add additional tomatoes until jar is filled to ½ inch from top. Add or remove contents to get ½ inch head space.

    10. Wipe top and threads of jar with clean, damp cloth. Remove one lid from simmering water with tongs and place it flat on top of jar, so sealing compound is against jar. Screw band down evenly and tightly.

    11. As each jar is filled, stand it on rack in canner of hot, not boiling water. Water should cover jars 1 – 2 inches. Add more water if necessary.

    12. Repeat for each jar.

    13. Put cover on canner. Bring water to boil. Keep at gentle but steady boil while processing. Do not open canner while processing.

    14. Process quarts 20 minutes. Pints 15 minutes. Higher altitudes may need different canning times.

    15. Remove jars and stand several inches apart and out of drafts. You will hear the lids “ping” as the jars seal. Allow to cool for about 12 hours. Do not retighten bands.. Test for seal (lid should remain depressed in center). When cooled, you may remove bands if desired. Wash outside jar surface. Store in dry, dark, cool area.


     [report anonymous abuse]
     
    anonymous picled beets August 29, 2005 10:25 AM

    Pick out small, unblemished beets, DO NOT cut green end off down to the beet. Trim root end slightly.

    Make this syrup:
    4 C. white sugar
    3 C. vinegar
    1-1/2 C. water
    2 T. salt
    1 or 2 tsp. mixed pickling spices (optional)

    Boil it all up til sugar is completely dissolved. Keep hot.

    Cook beets in boiling water til tender. Peel and remove ends. Pack into hot pint size jars. Pour syrup over beets. Add hot lids and rings. Hot Water Bath for 15 minutes, or Pressure can for 10 minutes at 10 pounds of pressure.

     [report anonymous abuse]
     
    anonymous pickled green beans August 29, 2005 10:24 AM

    Choose slender small green beans, about 4-5 inches in length. These are called Haricots Verts.
    Pack raw beans into hot pint size jars. Pour over this very hot mixture:

    3 C. vinegar
    1-1/2 C. water
    3 cloves of garlic, crushed, OR add one whole garlic clove to each jar
    2 T. salt
    Piece of Hot Red Pepper if desired.

    Mix all and heat to boiling before pouring over beans.
    Use pint jars.
    Seal jars and Hot Water Bath for 20 minutes.
    Pressure cook for 10 minutes at 10 lbs.

     [report anonymous abuse]
     
    anonymous Canning baked beans August 29, 2005 10:21 AM

    8-1/2 lbs. dry beans
    1-1/2 lbs smoked ham pieces, or bacon
    1/3 c. salt
    Soak the beans and meat in water overnight, OR Bring the beans and meat to a boil, boil for 2 minutes, then remove from heat and let soak for 1 hour.

    Next, make this sauce:
    4 quarts of peeled tomatoes
    2 quarts water
    1 lb sugar
    1/2 c. brown sugar
    1/3 c. Karo syrup
    1/2 tsp. red pepper
    1 tsp. dry mustard
    1 tsp. cinnamon
    1/2 C. cornstarch

    Now, heat the beans to boiling.
    Heat the sauce to boiling.
    Put the beans in HOT jars, filling the jars 2/3 full. Pour sauce over beans, fill to 1 inch below edge of jar.
    Add hot lids and rings.
    Pressure can at 10 lbs of pressure for 45 minutes.
    These are really good to have to take somewhere at the last minute, or just to use for a good buy on beans.

    Sylvia

     [report anonymous abuse]

     
    anonymous Canning Hamburger August 29, 2005 10:20 AM

    It's easy!

    The directions are fairly simple -- brown your ground beef and drain, season however you like (we like a little tomato sauce, salt, chili powder, garlic, onion) and process (I do mine in pints) in the pressure canner for apx. 75 minutes. You want some liquid in the jar so it will "swirl" and boil properly during processing (never pack it solid). Also - when you use your homecanned meat, boil it for 10 minutes as a "safety-net" precaution.

    We are trying to stock up on some canned foods for our pantry, but we keep using the beef from time to time - mostly for burritos, taco salad, or super-quick chili ---- Yummy!

    ~Anastasia

     [report anonymous abuse]
     
    anonymous  August 29, 2005 10:19 AM

    CANNING PEPPERS (HOT OR SWEET)

     
    Hot or sweet, including
    chiles, jalapeno, and pimento
    Quantity: An average of 9 pounds is needed per
    canner load of 9 pints.
    A bushel weighs 25 pounds and yields 20 to 30
    pints--an average of 1 pound per pint.
    Quality: Select firm yellow, green, or
    red peppers. Do not use soft or diseased peppers.

    Procedure: Select your
    favorite pepper(s). Caution: If you choose hot peppers, wear plastic gloves
    while handling them or wash hands thoroughly with soap and water before
    touching your face. Small peppers may be left whole. Large peppers may be
    quartered. Remove cores and seeds. Slash two or four slits in each pepper, and
    either blanch in boiling water or blister using one of the following methods:
    Oven or broiler method: Place peppers in a hot oven (400 degrees F) or broiler
    for 6-8 minutes until skins blister. Range-top method: Cover hot burner,
    either gas or electric, with heavy wire mesh. Place peppers on burner for
    several minutes until skins blister. Allow peppers to cool. Place in a pan
    and cover with a damp cloth. This will make peeling the peppers easier. After
    several minutes, peel each pepper. Flatten whole peppers. Add 1/2 teaspoon of
    salt to each pint jar, if desired. Fill jars loosely with peppers and add fresh
    boiled water, leaving 1-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process following
    the recommendations in Table 1 or Table 2 according to the method of canning
    used. Table 1. Recommended process time for Peppers in a dial-gauge pressure
    canner. Style of Pack: Hot. Jar Size: Half-pints or Pints. Process Time: 35
    minutes. Canner Pressure (PSI) at Altitudes of 0 - 2,000 ft: 11 lb.
    2,001 - 4,000 ft: 12 lb.
    4,001 - 6,000 ft: 13 lb. 6,001 - 8,000 ft: 14
    lb. Table 2. Recommended process time for Peppers in a weighted-gauge
    pressure canner. Style of Pack: Hot. Jar Size: Half-pints or Pints. Process
    Time: 35 minutes. Canner Pressure (PSI) at Altitudes of 0 - 1,000 ft: 10 lb.
    Above 1,000 ft: 15 lb. =======

     [report anonymous abuse]

     
    anonymous  August 07, 2005 8:13 AM

    Sweet Cherry Jam:Wash, pit and finely chop enough cherries to equal 4 1/2 cups. The chopping can be done in a food processor. Put cherries into saucepan and add 6 1/4 cups sugar. Bring the mixture to a full rolling boil and add 1 package of powdered pectin. Return to a rolling boil, and boil 1 minute longer. Remove from heat and skim off any foam with a spoon. Ladle into sterilized canning jars filling to within 1/8 inch of tops. Wipe jar rims and threads. Cover with flat lids then screw bands tightly. Process in a water bath for 10 minutes.  [report anonymous abuse]
     
    anonymous OKRA PICKLES July 18, 2005 8:50 PM

    OKRA PICKLES

    3 1/2 lbs. sm. okra pods
    5 cloves garlic
    5 sm. fresh hot peppers
    1 qt. Water
    1 pt. vinegar (5% acidity)
    1/3 c. pickling salt
    2 tsp. dill seeds
     

    Pack okra tightly in hot sterilized jars, leaving 1/4 inch head space. Place a clove of garlic and a hot pepper in each jar. Combine remaining ingredients in a saucepan, bring to a boil. Pour vinegar mixture over okra leaving 1/4 head space. Cover at once with metal lids and screw bands tight. Process in boiling water bath 10 minutes. Yield: 4 to 5 pints

     [report anonymous abuse]
     
    anonymous  June 25, 2005 10:45 PM

    Boiling Water Canner
      Canning Equipment
     


    Processing Time
    Processing time depends on the altitude you're at. The higher the altitude, the longer the processing time. Please adjust your recipe as follows


     


    Altitude Increased Processing Time
    Feet Metres Increase by:
    1,001 - 3,000 306 - 915 5 minutes
    3,001 - 6,000 916 - 1,830 10 minutes
    6,001 - 8,000 1,831 - 2,440 15 minutes
    8,001 - 10,000 2,441 - 3,050 20 minutes

    Tips:

    Tomatoes are normally considered high in acid, but the acid level isn't quite high enough for canning. To bring tomatoes up to the proper acidic level, vinegar, lemon juice or citric acid must be added. Add 4-tbsp vinegar, 2-tbsp of bottled lemon juice or 1/2-tsp of citric acid per quart of tomatoes. For pints, use 2-tbsp vinegar, 1-tbsp lemon juice or 1/4-tsp citric acid
    Processing time doesn't start until the canner is brought back to a rolling boil
    Spoilage signs are a swollen lid, leaky jar, and discolouration of the food. Never eat food from the jar with these signs. If the lid isn't pulled down in the sealed position, discard. 
    What is Pectin?
     Pectin is a natural product found in the skins and cores of fruit. The commercially prepared pectin is usually made from waste citrus peel after juicers are finished with the crop.
    The reason for adding pectin to jams and jellies is that the pectin helps the fruit gel. Some fruits are naturally high in pectin and can be made into jelly without the assistance of pectin. Some examples of high pectin fruit are tart apples, crab apples, gooseberries and cranberries. When a fruit is just about to turn ripe, the pectin level is at its highest, so if a high pectin fruit is going to be made into jam without the assistance of added pectin, the best time to do this is when the fruit is ¾ ripe.
    There is a ratio of sugar to pectin that must be kept if the fruit is to gel. That’s where a good proven recipe comes in. This ratio is already set in the recipe.
    There are two types of commercially available pectin, liquid and powdered. These have different properties and can’t be interchanged so stick to the type of pectin in the recipe.
    A good standard to adhere to is to purchase fresh pectin each year. Old pectin may result in poor gels
    Big Dave wrote in with this handy tip:
    I found a old fashioned trick for checking pickling brines for sufficient salt.
    You put a raw egg into the brine and when it floats there is enough salt

     

     [report anonymous abuse]
     
    anonymous Canning and Freezing June 25, 2005 10:43 PM

    Canning Tips
    & Techniques

    Foods that are being canned fall into two different canning techniques. High acid and low acid. High acid foods can be canned in a boiling water canner, while the low acid foods can only be canned safely in a pressure cooker. Our site deals only with high acid foods that are done in the water bath.

    Low Acid Foods
    Low acid foods (pH higher than 4.6) such as vegetables, meats, seafood, soups, and sauces can't combat the harmful bacteria at the low temperature of a boiling water canner (212*F).  They need the high temperature of a pressure canner (240*F) to be canned safely. When canning vegetables (beets, cucumber etc.), the acid level is brought higher when pickled with vinegar, and can safely be canned with the boiling water bath

    High Acid Foods
    High acid foods (pH lower than 4.6) such as fruits, jams, jellies, pickles, relishes, chutneys, and acidified tomatoes can all be safely canned with the boiling water bath technique. The 212*F temperature is high enough to kill any bacteria that can survive the high acid. There is another important issue when canning... time. The food being processed must be boiled in the canner for the exact time on the recipe or you run the chance of not killing all the natural yeasts, enzymes, and microorganisms.

    Canning Jars
    It is important to not use just any jar for canning. You must use a proper canning jar with the proper 2-piece lid to ensure an air tight seal. Discard any jars that are nicked on the thread or are cracked

    Lids
    The 2-piece lid consists of a sealing cap and a screw cap. The screw cap can be reused but always use new sealing caps to ensure an air-tight seal. Boiling the lids is no longer required. Heat to 180*F/82*C only. They must be placed on the jar hot for a proper seal. There is no preparation needed for the screw cap as it doesn't come in contact with the food
     

     

    Step by Step Guide to Canning with a Boiling Water Canner

    Sterilization of Empty Jars
    To sterilize empty jars, place them right side up on the rack in a boiling-water canner. Fill the canner and jars with hot (not boiling) water to 1 inch above the tops of the jars. Boil 10 minutes at altitudes of less than 1,000 feet. At higher elevations, boil 1 additional minute for each additional 1,000 feet elevation. Remove and drain hot sterilized jars one at a time as filled.

    Lids
    Heat lids in hot water at 180*F/82*C only. They must be placed on the jar hot for a proper seal. There is no preparation needed for the screw cap as it doesn't come in contact with the food.

    Food Preparation
    Select the best fruit and vegetables for canning. Overripe and blemished fruit and vegetables shouldn't be used. To prevent some fruit from discolouration, use commercial ascorbic acid and citric acid mixtures such as "Fruit Fresh" according to directions.

    Filling the Jars
    Use of a canning funnel is recommended. It has a wide mouth to match up with the jar opening.
    Hot Pack
    Hot pack means the food is hot going into the jar. Whether it is cooked, like relish, or brought to a boil, like jam, it goes into the jar hot
    Cold Pack
    Cold pack means there was no cooking of what you are canning. Pickles are an example of that. Just place the cucumbers in the jar after being washed and add the remaining ingredients and pour the hot liquid over top and process

    Always remove the air bubbles by sliding a wooden or non-metallic utensil down the side of the jar. You may have to adjust the headspace after releasing all the trapped air

    Headspace
    This is the space at the top of the jar. It is measured from where the lid sits and goes down.
    Headspace differs depending on what you are processing. For proper sealing, use the following guidelines


    Headspace
     
    Jam & Jelly - 1/4" Pickles & Tomatoes - 1/2"
    Fruit - 1/2" Relish, Salsa and Chutney - 1/2"

    Clean the Rim
    Wipe the rim with a clean damp cloth to remove any stickiness and anything that would hamper a good seal

    Cap
    Place the sealing cap on the jar. Apply the screw cap only until resistance is felt. Overtightening may cause seal failure

    Processing
    When all the jars are filled and are ready for processing, lower the jars into the boiling water canner making sure the jars are completely submerged with at least 1" of water over the top. Place the lid on the canner and bring back to a boil. When the water returns to a boil, start counting the processing time according to the recipe. When the processing time has finished, turn off the heat and wait for the rolling boil to stop. Gently remove the jars from the water without tilting and place on a dish towel to cool. Let cool 24 hours. While cooling, you'll here the pop of the lids being pulled down. That sound is the sound of a good seal. If the sealing cap isn't pulled down, the jar needs to be reprocessed. If after a second processing doesn't give you a good seal, refrigerate and use first.

       
     

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