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Anonymous
7 years ago

bibulous    [BIB-yuh-luhs]

adjective:
1. Of, pertaining to, marked by, or given to the consumption of alcoholic drink.
2. Readily absorbing fluids or moisture.

Bibulous comes from Latin bibulus, from bibere, "to drink."

Anonymous
7 years ago

gelid    [JEL-id]

adjective:
Extremely cold; icy.

Gelid comes from Latin gelidus, from gelu, "frost, cold."

Anonymous
7 years ago

comity    [KOM-uh-tee]

noun:
1. A state of mutual harmony, friendship, and respect, especially between or among nations or people; civility.
2. The courteous recognition by one nation of the laws and institutions of another.
3. The group of nations observing international comity.

Comity is from Latin comitas, from comis, "courteous."

Anonymous
7 years ago

multifarious    [muhl-tuh-FAIR-ee-uhs]

adjective:
Having great diversity or variety; of various kinds; diversified.

Multifarious derives from Latin multifariam, "on many sides; in many places."

Anonymous
7 years ago

gnomic    [NOH-mik]

adjective:
Uttering, containing, or characterized by maxims; wise and pithy.

Gnomic derives from Greek gnomikos, from gnome, "intelligence, hence an expressed example of intelligence," from gignoskein, "to know."

Anonymous
7 years ago

hermitage    [HUHR-muh-tij]

noun:
1. The habitation of a hermit or group of hermits.
2. A monastery or abbey.
3. A secluded residence; a retreat; a hideaway.
4. (Capitalized) A palace in St. Petersburg, now an art museum.

Hermitage is from Old French hermitage, from heremite, "hermit," ultimately from Greek eremites, "dwelling in the desert," from eremia, "desert," from eremos, "solitary; desolate."

Anonymous
7 years ago

benefaction    [BEN-uh-fak-shuhn; ben-uh-FAK-shuhn]

noun:
1. The act of conferring a benefit.
2. A benefit conferred; especially, a charitable donation.

Benefaction is from Late Latin benefactio, from Latin benefacere, "to do well, to do good to," from bene, "well" + facere, "to do."

Anonymous
7 years ago

amity    [AM-uh-tee]

noun:
Friendship; friendly relations, especially between nations.

Amity comes from Old French-Medieval French amistié, amisté, ultimately from Latin amicus, "friendly, a friend," from amare, "to love."

Anonymous
7 years ago

persiflage    [PUR-suh-flahzh]

noun:
Frivolous or bantering talk; a frivolous manner of treating any subject, whether serious or otherwise; light raillery.

Persiflage comes from French, from persifler, "to banter," from per-, "thoroughly" (from Latin) + siffler, "to hiss, to whistle," ultimately from Latin sibilare, "to hiss (at), to whistle."

Anonymous
7 years ago

calumny    [KAL-uhm-nee]

noun:
1. False accusation of a crime or offense, intended to injure another's reputation.
2. Malicious misrepresentation; slander.

Calumny comes, via Middle French, from Latin calumnia, from calvi, "to form intrigues, to deceive." The adjective form is calumnious.

Anonymous
7 years ago

finical    [FIN-ih-kuhl]

adjective:
Extremely or unduly particular in standards or taste; fastidious; finicky.

Finical is probably derived from fine.

Anonymous
7 years ago

tocsin    [TOCK-sin]

noun:
1. An alarm bell, or the ringing of a bell for the purpose of alarm.
2. A warning.

Tocsin derives from Medieval French touquesain, from Old Provençal tocasenh, from tocar, "to touch, to strike, to ring a bell" + senh, "church bell," ultimately from Latin signum, "sign, signal."

Anonymous
7 years ago

discursive    [dis-KUR-siv]

adjective:
1. Passing from one topic to another; ranging over a wide field; digressive; rambling.
2. Utilizing, marked by, or based on analytical reasoning -- contrasted with intuitive.

Discursive comes from Latin discurrere, "to run in different directions, to run about, to run to and fro," from dis-, "apart, in different directions" + currere, "to run."

Anonymous
7 years ago

pari passu    [PAIR-ee-PASS-oo; PAIR-ih-PASS-oo]

adverb:
At an equal pace or rate.

Pari passu literally means "with equal step," from Latin pari, ablative of par, "equal" + passu, ablative of passus, "step."

Anonymous
7 years ago

unfledged    [uhn-FLEJD]

adjective:
1. Lacking the feathers necessary for flight.
2. Not fully developed; immature.

Unfledged is from obsolete fledge, "capable of flying; feathered," from Middle English flegge, from Old English -flycge.

Anonymous
7 years ago

complement    [KOM-pluh-muhnt]

noun:
1. Something that fills up or completes.
2. The quantity or number required to make up a whole or to make something complete.
3. One of two parts that complete a whole or mutually complete each other; a counterpart.

transitive verb:
1. To supply what is lacking; to serve as a complement to; to supplement
.

Complement is from Latin complementum, from complere, "to fill up," from com- (intensive prefix) + plere, "to fill."

Anonymous
7 years ago

draconian    [dray-KOHN-ee-uhn; druh-]

adjective:
1. Pertaining to Draco, a lawgiver of Athens, 621 B.C.
2. Excessively harsh; severe
.

Draconian refers to a code of laws made by Draco. Their measures were so severe that they were said to be written in blood.

Anonymous
7 years ago

frangible    [FRAN-juh-buhl]

adjective:
Capable of being broken; brittle; fragile; easily broken.

Frangible ultimately derives from Latin frangere, "to break."

Anonymous
7 years ago

cacophony    [kuh-KAH-fuh-nee]

noun:
1. Harsh or discordant sound; dissonance.
2. The use of harsh or discordant sounds in literary composition.

Cacophony comes from Greek kakophonia, from kakophonos, from kakos, "bad" + phone, "sound." The adjective form is cacophonous. The opposite of cacophony is euphony.

Anonymous
7 years ago

dishabille    [dis-uh-BEEL]

noun:
1. The state of being carelessly or partially dressed.
2. Casual or lounging attire.
3. An intentionally careless or casual manner.

Dishabille comes from French déshabiller, "to undress," from dés-, "dis-" + habiller, "to clothe, to dress."

Anonymous
7 years ago

artifice    [AR-tuh-fis]

noun:
1. Cleverness or skill; ingenuity; inventiveness.
2. An ingenious or artful device or expedient.
3. An artful trick or stratagem.
4. Trickery; craftiness; insincere or deceptive behavior.

Artifice comes from artificium, from artifex, artific-, "artificer, craftsman," from Latin ars, art-, "art" + facere, "to make." It is related to artificial.

Anonymous
7 years ago

perspicacity    [pur-spuh-KAS-uh-tee]

noun:
Clearness of understanding or insight; penetration, discernment.

Perspicacity comes from Latin perspicax, perspicac-, "sharp-sighted," from perspicere, "to look through," from per, "through" + specere, "to look."

Anonymous
7 years ago

rapprochement    [rap-rosh-MAWN]

noun:
The establishment or state of cordial relations.

Rapprochement comes from the French, from rapprocher, "to bring nearer," from Middle French, from re- + approcher, "to approach," from Old French aprochier, from Late Latin appropire, from Latin ad- + propius, "nearer," comparative of prope, "near."

Anonymous
7 years ago

mendicant    [MEN-dih-kunt]

noun:
1. A beggar; especially, one who makes a business of begging.
2. A member of an order of friars forbidden to acquire landed property and required to be supported by alms.

adjective:
1. Practicing beggary; begging; living on alms; as, mendicant friars.

Mendicant derives from Latin mendicare, "to beg," from mendicus, "beggar."

Anonymous
7 years ago

surly    [SUR-lee]

adjective:
1. Ill-humored; churlish in manner or mood; sullen and gruff.
2. Menacing or threatening in appearance, as of weather conditions; ominous.

Surly is from Middle English sirly, "lordly," from sir, "lord," which eventually came to mean "arrogant or haughty," whence the more negative modern sense.

Anonymous
7 years ago

deracinate    [dee-RAS-uh-nayt]

transitive verb:
1. To pluck up by the roots; to uproot.
2. To displace from one's native or accustomed environment.

Deracinate comes from Middle French desraciner, from des-, "from" (from Latin de-) + racine, "root" (from Late Latin radicina, from Latin radix, radic-). The noun form is deracination.

Anonymous
7 years ago

tarradiddle    [tair-uh-DID-uhl]

noun:
1. A petty falsehood; a fib.
2. Pretentious nonsense.

Tarradiddle is of unknown origin.

Anonymous
7 years ago

profuse    [pruh-FYOOS; proh-]

adjective:
1. Pouring forth with fullness or exuberance; giving or given liberally and abundantly; extravagant.
2. Exhibiting great abundance; plentiful; copious; bountiful.

Profuse comes from Latin profusus, past participle of profundere, "to pour forth," from pro-, "forth" + fundere, "to pour."

Anonymous
7 years ago

vicissitude    [vih-SIS-ih-tood; -tyood]

noun:
1. Regular change or succession from one thing to another; alternation; mutual succession; interchange.
2. Irregular change; revolution; mutation.
3. A change in condition or fortune; an instance of mutability in life or nature (especially successive alternation from one condition to another).

Vicissitude comes from Latin vicissitudo, from vicissim, in turn, probably from vices, changes.

Anonymous
7 years ago

cavalcade    [kav-uhl-KAYD; KAV-uhl-kayd]

noun:
1. A procession of riders or horse-drawn carriages.
2. Any procession.
3. A sequence; a series.

Cavalcade derives from Old Italian cavalcata, from cavalcare, "to go on horseback," from Late Latin caballicare, from Latin caballus, "horse."

Anonymous
7 years ago

chichi    [SHEE-shee]

adjective:
Affectedly trendy.

From the French word that literally means "curl of false hair"; used figuratively in the phrases faire des chichis, "to have affected manners, to make a fuss"; and gens à chichis, "affected, snobbish people." Sometimes spelled "chi-chi."

Anonymous
7 years ago

malapropos    [mal-ap-ruh-POH]

adjective:
1. Unseasonable; unsuitable; inappropriate.

adverb:
1. In an inappropriate or inopportune manner; unseasonably.

Malapropos comes from French mal à propos, "badly to the purpose."

Anonymous
7 years ago

hirsute    [HUR-soot; HIR-soot; hur-SOOT; hir-SOOT]

adjective:
Covered with hair; set with bristles; shaggy; hairy.

Hirsute comes from Latin hirsutus, "covered with hair, rough, shaggy, prickly."

Anonymous
7 years ago

incongruous    [in-KONG-groo-us]

adjective:
1. Lacking in harmony, compatibility, or appropriateness.
2. Inconsistent with reason, logic, or common sense.

Incongruous comes from Latin incongruus, from in-, "not" + congruus, "agreeing, fit, suitable," from congruere, "to run together, to come together, to meet."

fond memories
7 years ago
I haven't heard the word kvetch in YEARS! My dad's side of the family used to use it all the time when they were talking about us kids. LOL! Thanks for bringing back fond memories.
7 years ago
Thanks for keeping on this thread Betty, you have my eternal gratitude.
Anonymous
7 years ago

kvetch    [KVECH]

adjective:
1. To complain habitually.

noun:
1. A complaint.
2. A habitual complainer.

Kvetch comes from Yiddish kvetshn, "to squeeze, to complain," from Middle High German quetzen, quetschen, "to squeeze."

Anonymous
7 years ago

foundling    [FOWND-ling]

noun:
A deserted or abandoned infant; a child found without a parent or caretaker.

Foundling comes from Old English foundling, fundling, from finden, "to find" + the suffix -ling.

mandate 3
7 years ago

Mandate can refer to:

mandate- 2
7 years ago

Etymology:

Middle French & Latin; Middle French mandat, from Latin mandatum, from neuter of mandatus, past participle of mandare to entrust, enjoin, probably irregular from manus hand + -dere to put — more at manual, do

1: an authoritative command; especially : a formal order from a superior court or official to an inferior one2: an authorization to act given to a representative <accepted the mandate of the people>3 a

Mandate
7 years ago

mandate[1,noun]mandate[2,transitive verb]

1man·date

Anonymous
7 years ago

recumbent    [rih-KUM-bunt]

adjective:
1. Reclining; lying down.
2. Resting; inactive; idle.

Recumbent comes from the present participle of Latin recumbere, "lie back, to recline," from re-, "back" + -cumbere "to lie."

Anonymous
7 years ago

somniferous    [som-NIF-uhr-uhs]

adjective:
Causing or inducing sleep.

Somniferous comes from Latin somnifer, "sleep-bringing," from somnus, "sleep" + ferre, "to bring."

Anonymous
7 years ago

postprandial    [post-PRAN-dee-uhl]

adjective:
Happening or done after a meal.

Postprandial is from post- + prandial, from Latin prandium, "a late breakfast or lunch."

Anonymous
7 years ago

deipnosophist    [dyp-NOS-uh-fist]

noun:
Someone who is skilled in table talk.

Deipnosophist comes from the title of a work written by the Greek Athenaeus in about 228 AD, Deipnosophistai, in which a number of wise men sit at a dinner table and discuss a wide range of topics. It is derived from deipnon, "dinner" + sophistas, "a clever or wise man."

Anonymous
7 years ago

wiseacre    [WY-zay-kuhr]

noun:
One who pretends to knowledge or cleverness; a would-be wise person; a smart aleck.

Wiseacre comes from Middle Dutch wijssegger, "a soothsayer," from Old High German wissago, alteration of wizago, "a prophet."

Anonymous
7 years ago

extirpate    [EK-stur-payt]

transitive verb:
1. To pull up by the stem or root.
2. To destroy completely.
3. To remove by surgery.

Extirpate derives from Latin ex(s)tirpare, "to tear up by the root, hence to root out, to extirpate," from ex-, "from" + stirps, "the stalk or stem or a tree or other plant, with the roots."

Anonymous
7 years ago

gallimaufry    [gal-uh-MAW-free]

noun:
A medley; a hodgepodge.

Gallimaufry, originally meaning "a hash of various kinds of meats," comes from French galimafrée, from Old French, from galer, "to rejoice, to make merry" (source of English gala) + mafrer, "to eat much," from Medieval Dutch maffelen, "to open one's mouth wide."

Anonymous
7 years ago

comport    [kum-PORT]

transitive verb:
1. To conduct or behave (oneself) in a particular manner.

intransitive verb:
1. To be fitting; to accord; to agree -- usually followed by 'with'.

Comport comes from Medieval French comporter, "to conduct," from Latin comportare, "to carry, to bring together," from com-, "with, together" + portare, "to carry."

Anonymous
7 years ago

restive    [RES-tiv]

adjective:
1. Impatient under restriction, delay, coercion, or opposition; resisting control.
2. Unwilling to go on; obstinate in refusing to move forward; stubborn.

Restive comes from Medieval French restif, from rester, "to remain," ultimately from Latin restare, "to stand back, to remain behind," from re-, "back" + stare, "to stand."

Hector
7 years ago
I'm glad I didn't name any of my kids Hector! LOL!
Anonymous
7 years ago

aggrandize    [uh-GRAN-dyz; AG-ruhn-dyz]

transitive verb:
1. To make great or greater; to enlarge; to increase.
2. To make great or greater in power, rank, reputation, or wealth; -- applied to persons, countries, etc.
3. To make appear great or greater; to exalt.

Aggrandize comes from French agrandir, from Old French, from a-, "to" (from Latin ad-) + grandir, "to grow larger," from Latin grandire, from grandis, "large."

Anonymous
7 years ago

hector    [HEK-tur]

noun:
1. A bully.

transitive verb:
1. To intimidate or harass in a blustering way; to bully.

intransitive verb:
1. To play the bully; to bluster.

Hector derives from Greek Hektor, in Greek mythology the chief Trojan warrior and the eldest son of Priam, King of Troy.

Anonymous
7 years ago

flaneur    [flah-NUR]

noun:
One who strolls about aimlessly; a lounger; a loafer.

 Flaneur comes from French, from flâner, "to saunter; to stroll; to lounge about."

Anonymous
7 years ago

perfervid    [puhr-FUR-vid]

adjective:
Ardent; impassioned; marked by exaggerated or overwrought emotion.

Perfervid is from Latin per-, "through, thoroughly" + fervidus, "boiling," from fervere, "to boil."

Anonymous
7 years ago

gesticulate    [juh-STIK-yuh-layt]

intransitive verb:
1. To make gestures or motions, especially while speaking or instead of speaking.

transitive verb:
1. To indicate or express by gestures.

Gesticulate is from Latin gesticulatus, past participle of gesticulari, "to gesticulate," from gesticulus, diminutive of gestus, "gesture, action."

Anonymous
7 years ago

mercurial   [mur-KYUR-ee-uhl]

adjective:
1. [Often capitalized] Of or pertaining to the god Mercury.
2. [Often capitalized] Of or pertaining to the planet Mercury.
3. Having the qualities of shrewdness, eloquence, or thievishness attributed to the god Mercury.
4. Changeable in temperament or mood; temperamental; volatile.
5. Of, pertaining to, or containing mercury.
6. Caused by the use of mercury.

Mercurial comes from Latin Mercurius, "Mercury," the Roman god of commerce and messenger of the gods.

Anonymous
7 years ago

deleterious    [del-uh-TIR-ee-us]

adjective:
Harmful; destructive; pernicious.

Deleterious is derived from Greek deleterios, from deleisthai, "to hurt, to damage."

Anonymous
7 years ago

polyglot    [POL-ee-glot]

adjective:
1. Containing or made up of several languages.
2. Writing, speaking, or versed in many languages.

noun:
1. One who speaks several languages.

Polyglot derives from Greek polyglottos, from poly-, "many" + glotta, "tongue, language."

Anonymous
7 years ago
That's a great word. It's pronounced stee-uh-top-uh-guhs. I never knew a word like that existed. I'll have to remember that one.
Steatop'ygous
7 years ago
adj.,
Meaning; fat buttocked.
There is no pronouciation in my dictionary, but I believe it's pronounced, stee-a-top-ee-gus.
This had to be my departed Mother's most favourite word in the English language, (apart from the word 'No' when I was growing up of course! lol), she actually bought a dictionary once, just because it had this word in it! (I still have it )
Anonymous
7 years ago

ameliorate    [uh-MEEL-yuh-rayt]

transitive verb:
1. To make better; to improve.

intransitive verb:
1. To grow better.

Ameliorate is derived from Latin ad + meliorare, "to make better," from melior, "better."

Anonymous
7 years ago

I'm glad to see people are actually reading this thread. If you find a word you would like to share, please feel free to add it here.

fealty   [FEE-uhl-tee]

noun:
1. Fidelity to one's lord; the feudal obligation by which the tenant or vassal was bound to be faithful to his lord.
2. The oath by which this obligation was assumed.
3. Fidelity; allegiance; faithfulness.

Fealty comes from Old French fealté, from Latin fidelitas, "fidelity," from fidelis, "faithful," from fides, "faith," from fidere, "to trust."

7 years ago
woolgathering   [WOOL-gath-(uh)-ring]
Lesser known meaning:
That huge pile of sale yarn and left over bits that accumulates in the closet to mountain heights leaving the closet useless for nearly anything else.
Anonymous
7 years ago

bete noire    [bet-NWAHR]

noun:
Something or someone particularly detested or avoided; a bugbear.

Bête noire is French for "black beast."



This post was modified from its original form on 06 Nov, 6:00
Anonymous
7 years ago

woolgathering   [WOOL-gath-(uh)-ring]

noun:
Indulgence in idle daydreaming.

Woolgathering derives from the literal sense, "gathering fragments of wool."



This post was modified from its original form on 05 Nov, 5:59

Anonymous
7 years ago

sciolism   [SY-uh-liz-uhm]

noun:
Superficial knowledge; a superficial show of learning.

Sciolism comes from Late Latin sciolus, "a smatterer," from diminutive of Latin scius, "knowing," from scire, "to know." One who has only superficial knowledge is a sciolist.

Anonymous
7 years ago

myrmidon  [MUR-muh-don; -duhn]

 noun:
1. (Capitalized) A member of a warlike Thessalian people who followed Achilles on the expedition against Troy.
2. A loyal follower, especially one who executes orders without question, protest, or pity.

Myrmidon derives from Greek Myrmidones, a warlike people of ancient Thessaly.

Oh I love Ensorcell!
7 years ago
I'm writing a fantasy novel, and I can use that in it!  Thank you so much for finding that wonderful word!
Anonymous
7 years ago

forcible   [FOR-suh-buhl]

 adjective:
1. Using force against opposition or resistance; effected or accomplished by force; as, "forcible entry or abduction."
2. Characterized by force, efficiency, or energy; powerful.

Forcible ultimately derives from Latin fortis, "strong."

Anonymous
7 years ago

ensorcell   [en-SOR-suhl]

transitive verb:
To enchant; to bewitch.

Ensorcell comes from Middle French ensorceler, alteration of Old French ensorcerer, from en-, intensive prefix + sorcier, "sorcerer."

Anonymous
7 years ago

valetudinarian  [val-uh-too-din-AIR-ee-un; -tyoo-]

noun:
1. A weak or sickly person, especially one morbidly concerned with his or her health.

adjective:
1. Sickly; weak; infirm.
2. Morbidly concerned with one's health.

Valetudinarian derives from Latin valetudinarius, "sickly; an invalid," from valetudo, "state of health (good or ill)," from valere, "to be strong or well."

Anonymous
7 years ago

truckle  TRUHK-uhl

intransitive verb:
To yield or bend obsequiously to the will of another; to act in a subservient manner.

Truckle is from truckle in truckle bed (a low bed on wheels that may be pushed under another bed; also called a trundle bed), in reference to the fact that the truckle bed on which the pupil slept was rolled under the large bed of the master. The ultimate source of the word is Greek trokhos, "a wheel."

Anonymous
7 years ago

palindrome PAL-in-drohm

noun:
A word, phrase, sentence, or verse that reads the same backward or forward.

Palindrome comes from Greek palindromos, literally "running back (again)," from palin, "back, again" + dromos, "running."

Anonymous
7 years ago

slake SLAYK

transitive verb:
1. To satisfy; to quench; to extinguish; as, to slake thirst.
2. To cause to lessen; to make less active or intense; to moderate; as, slaking his anger.
3. To cause (as lime) to heat and crumble by treatment with water.

intransitive verb:
1. To become slaked; to crumble or disintegrate, as lime

Slake comes from Middle English slaken, "to become or render slack," hence "to abate," from Old English slacian, from slæc, "slack."

Anonymous
7 years ago

physiognomy fiz-ee-OG-nuh-mee; -ON-uh-mee

noun:
1. The art of discovering temperament and other characteristic qualities of the mind from the outward appearance, especially by the features of the face.
2. The face or facial features, especially when regarded as indicating character.
3. The general appearance or aspect of a thing.

Physiognomy comes from Greek physiognomonia, from physiognomon, "judging character by the features," from physis, "nature, physique, appearance" + gnomon, "one who knows, hence an examiner, a judge," from gignoskein, "to know."

Anonymous
7 years ago

maladroit mal-uh-DROYT

adjective:
Lacking adroitness; clumsy; awkward; unskillful; inept.

Maladroit comes from French, from mal-, "badly" + adroit, from à droit, "properly," from à, "to" (from Latin ad) + droit, "right," from Latin directus, "straight, direct," past participle of dirigere, "to lead or guide."

Anonymous
7 years ago

paroxysm PAIR-uhk-siz-uhm

noun:
1. (Medicine) A sudden attack, intensification, or recurrence of a disease.
2. Any sudden and violent emotion or action; an outburst; a fit.

Paroxysm is from Greek paroxusmos, from paroxunein, "to irritate, provoke or excite (literally to sharpen excessively)," from para-, "beyond" + oxunein, "to sharpen, to provoke."

Seems we've gotten behind.........
7 years ago

precipice PRES-uh-pis, noun:
1. A very steep, perpendicular, or overhanging place; a cliff.
2. The brink of a hazardous situation.

Anonymous
8 years ago

proselytize

[PROS-uh-luh-tyz]

intransitive verb:
1. To induce someone to convert to one's religious faith.
2. To induce someone to join one's institution, cause, or political party.

transitive verb:
1. To convert to some religion, system, opinion, or the like.

Proselytize is formed from proselyte, "a new convert, especially a convert to some religion or religious sect, or to some particular opinion, system, or party," from Greek proselutos, "a proselyte, a newcomer," from pros, "toward" + elutos, from eluthon, "I came."

Anonymous
8 years ago

fulminate

 [FUL-muh-nayt]

intransitive verb:
1. To issue or utter verbal attacks or censures authoritatively or menacingly.
2. To explode; to detonate.

transitive verb:
1. To utter or send out with denunciations or censures.
2. To cause to explode.

Fulminate comes from Latin fulminare, "to strike with lightning," from fulmen, fulmin-, "a thunderbolt."

Anonymous
8 years ago

quiescent

[kwy-ES-uhnt; kwee-]

adjective:
Being in a state of repose; at rest; still; inactive.

Quiescent derives from the present participle of Latin quiescere, to rest, from quies, rest.

Anonymous
8 years ago

leitmotif

[LYT-moh-teef]

noun:
1. In music drama, a marked melodic phrase or short passage which always accompanies the reappearance of a certain person, situation, abstract idea, or allusion in the course of the play; a sort of musical label.
2. A dominant and recurring theme.

Leitmotif (also spelled leitmotiv) is from German Leitmotiv, "leading motif," from leiten, "to lead" (from Old High German leitan) + Motiv, "motif," from the French. It is especially associated with the operas of German composer Richard Wagner.

Anonymous
8 years ago

sanctum

[SANK-tum]

noun;
plural sanctums or sancta::
1. A sacred place.
2. A place of retreat where one is free from intrusion.

Sanctum comes from the Latin, meaning "holy, sacred, or inviolable."

Anonymous
8 years ago

palliate

[PAL-ee-ayt]

transitive verb:
1. To reduce in violence (said of diseases, etc.); to lessen or abate.
2. To cover by excuses and apologies; to extenuate.
3. To reduce in severity; to make less intense.

 Palliate derives from Late Latin palliatus, past participle of palliare, "to cloak, to conceal," from Latin pallium, "cloak."

Anonymous
8 years ago

epicene

[EP-uh-seen]

adjective:
1. Having the characteristics of both sexes.
2. Effeminate; unmasculine.
3. Sexless; neuter.
4. (Linguistics) Having but one form of the noun for both the male and the female.

noun:
1. A person or thing that is epicene.
2. (Linguistics) An epicene word.

Epicene derives from Latin epicoenus, from Greek epikoinos, "common to," from epi-, "upon" + koinos, "common."

Anonymous
8 years ago

lumpen

[LUHM-puhn; LUM-puhn]

adjective;
plural lumpen, also lumpens:
1. Of or relating to dispossessed and displaced individuals, especially those who have lost social status.
2. Common; vulgar.

noun:
1. A member of the underclass, especially the lowest social stratum.

Lumpen is from German Lumpenproletariat, "degraded stratum of the proletariat," from Lump, "a contemptible person" (from Lumpen, "rags") + Proletariat, "proletariat," from French.

Anonymous
8 years ago

incipient

[in-SIP-ee-uhnt]

adjective:
Beginning to exist or appear.

Incipient is derived from Latin incipere, "to undertake, to begin" (literally "to take in"), from in-, "in" + capere, "to take." It is related to inception, "beginning, commencement."

Anonymous
8 years ago

perfunctory

[pur-FUNGK-tuh-ree]

adjective:
1. Done merely to carry out a duty; performed mechanically or routinely.
2. Lacking interest, care, or enthusiasm; indifferent.

Perfunctory derives from Late Latin perfunctorius, from Latin perfungi, to perform fully, to get done with, from per-, through + fungi, to perform.

Anonymous
8 years ago

discomfit

[dis-KUHM-fit; dis-kuhm-FIT]

transitive verb:
1. To make uneasy or perplexed, or to put into a state of embarrassment; to disconcert; to upset.
2. To thwart; to frustrate the plans of.
3. (Archaic). To defeat in battle.

Discomfit comes from Old French desconfit, past participle of desconfire, from Latin dis- + conficere, "to make ready, to prepare, to bring about," from com- + facere, "to make."

Anonymous
8 years ago

biddable

[BID-uh-buhl]

adjective:
1. Easily led or commanded; obedient.
2. Capable of being bid.

Biddable is from bid, which partly comes from Middle English bidden, "to ask, to command," from Old English biddan; and partly from Middle English beden, "to offer, to proclaim," from Old English beodan.

Anonymous
8 years ago

omnipresent

[om-nuh-PREZ-uhnt]

adjective:
Present in all places at the same time; ubiquitous.

Omnipresent is from Medieval Latin omnipresens, from Latin omni-, "all" + praesens, present participle of praeesse, "to be before, to be present," from prae-, "before" + esse, "to be."

Anonymous
8 years ago

disconsolate

[dis-KON-suh-lut]

adjective:
1. Being beyond consolation; deeply dejected and dispirited; hopelessly sad; filled with grief; as, "a bereaved and disconsolate parent."
2. Inspiring dejection; saddening; cheerless; as, "the disconsolate darkness of the winter nights."

Disconsolate comes from Medieval Latin disconsolatus, from Latin dis- + consolatus, past participle of consolari, "to console," from com-, intensive prefix + solari, "to comfort, to soothe, to relieve."

Anonymous
8 years ago

chortle

[CHOR-tl]

transitive and intransitive verb:
1. To utter, or express with, a snorting, exultant laugh or chuckle.

noun:
1. A snorting, exultant laugh or chuckle.

Chortle a combination of chuckle and snort. It was coined by Lewis Carroll (Charles L. Dodgson), in Through the Looking-Glass, published in 1872.

Anonymous
8 years ago

fecund

[FEE-kuhnd; FEK-uhnd]

adjective:
1. Capable of producing offspring or vegetation; fruitful; prolific.
2. Intellectually productive or inventive.

Fecund comes from Latin fecundus, "fruitful, prolific." The noun form is fecundity.

Anonymous
8 years ago

fiat

[FEE-uht; -at; -aht; FY-uht; -at]

noun:
1. An arbitrary or authoritative command or order.
2. Formal or official authorization or sanction.

Fiat derives from Latin fiat, "let it be done," from fieri, "to be done."

Anonymous
8 years ago

redolent

[RED-uh-luhnt]

adjective:
1. Having or exuding fragrance; scented; aromatic.
2. Full of fragrance; odorous; smelling (usually used with 'of' or 'with').
3. Serving to bring to mind; evocative; suggestive; reminiscent (usually used with 'of' or 'with').

Redolent derives from Latin redolens, -entis, present participle of redolere, "to emit a scent, to diffuse an odor," from red-, re- + olere, "to exhale an odor."

Anonymous
8 years ago

delectation

[dee-lek-TAY-shun]

noun:
Great pleasure; delight, enjoyment.

Delectation derives from Latin delectatio, from the past participle of delectare, "to please."

Anonymous
8 years ago

insuperable

[in-SOO-pur-uh-bul]

adjective:
Incapable of being passed over, surmounted, or overcome; insurmountable; as, "insuperable difficulties."

Insuperable comes from Latin insuperabilis, from in-, "not" + superare, "to go above or over, to surmount," from super, "above, over."

Anonymous
8 years ago

furtive

[FUR-tiv]

adjective:
1. Done by stealth; surreptitious; secret; as, a furtive look.
2. Expressive of stealth; sly; shifty; sneaky.
3. Stolen; obtained by stealth.
4. Given to stealing; thievish; pilfering.

Furtive is from Latin furtivus, from furtum, "theft," from fur, "thief."

Anonymous
8 years ago

 bombast

[BOM-bast]

noun:
Pompous or pretentious speech or writing.

Bombast comes from Medieval French bombace, "cotton, hance padding," from Late Latin bombax, "cotton."

Anonymous
8 years ago

flagitious

[fluh-JISH-uhs]

adjective:
1. Disgracefully or shamefully criminal; grossly wicked; scandalous; -- said of acts, crimes, etc.
2. Guilty of enormous crimes; corrupt; profligate; -- said of persons.
3. Characterized by enormous crimes or scandalous vices; as, "flagitious times."

Flagitious comes from Latin flagitiosus, from flagitium, "a shameful or disgraceful act," originally, "a burning desire, heat of passion," from flagitare, "to demand earnestly or hotly," connected with flagrare, "to blaze, to burn."

Anonymous
8 years ago

penchant

[PEN-chunt]

noun:
Inclination; decided taste; a strong liking.

Penchant comes from the present participle of French pencher, "to incline, to bend," from (assumed) Late Latin pendicare, "to lean," from Latin pendere, "to weigh."

Anonymous
8 years ago

vitiate

[VISH-ee-ayt]

transitive verb:
1. To make faulty or imperfect; to render defective; to impair; as, "exaggeration vitiates a style of writing."
2. To corrupt morally; to debase.
3. To render ineffective; as, "fraud vitiates a contract."

Vitiate comes from Latin vitiare, from vitium, fault. It is related to vice (a moral failing or fault), which comes from vitium via French.

Anonymous
8 years ago

doughty

[DOW-tee]

adjective:
Marked by fearless resolution; valiant; brave.

Doughty comes from Old English dohtig, "brave, valiant, fit."

Anonymous
8 years ago

acrimony

[AK-ruh-moh-nee]

noun:
Bitter, harsh, or biting sharpness, as of language, disposition, or manners.

Acrimony is from Latin acrimonia, from acer, "sharp."

Anonymous
8 years ago

denouement

[day-noo-MAWN]

noun:
1. The final resolution of the main complication of a literary or dramatic work.
2. The outcome of a complex sequence of events.

Denouement is from French, from Old French denoer, "to untie," from Latin de- + nodare, "to tie in a knot," from nodus, "a knot."

Anonymous
8 years ago

celerity

[suh-LAIR-uh-tee]

noun:
Rapidity of motion or action; quickness; swiftness.

Celerity is from Latin celeritas, from celer, "swift." It is related to accelerate.

Anonymous
8 years ago

pastiche

[pas-TEESH; pahs-]

noun:
1. A work of art that imitates the style of some previous work.
2. A musical, literary, or artistic composition consisting of selections from various works.
3. A hodgepodge; an incongruous combination of different styles and ingredients.

Pastiche comes from Italian pasticcio, "a paste," hence "a hodgepodge, literary or musical," ultimately from Latin pasta, "paste."

Anonymous
8 years ago

sapid

[SAP-id]

adjective:
1. Having taste or flavor, especially having a strong pleasant flavor.
2. Agreeable to the mind; to one's liking.

Sapid comes from Latin sapidus, "savory," from sapere, "to taste."

Anonymous
8 years ago

redound

[rih-DOWND]

intransitive verb:
1. To have a consequence or effect.
2. To return; to rebound; to reflect.
3. To become added or transferred; to accrue.

Redound, originally "to be in excess or to overflow," derives from Latin redundare, "to overflow, to be in abundance or excess," from re- + unda, "wave."

Anonymous
8 years ago

pantheon

[PAN-thee-on; -uhn]

noun:
1. A temple dedicated to all the gods; especially (capitalized), the building so called at Rome.
2. The collective gods of a people; as, a goddess of the Greek pantheon.
3. A public building commemorating and dedicated to the famous dead of a nation.
4. A group of highly esteemed persons.

Pantheon comes from Greek pantheion, "temple of all the gods," from pan-, "all" + theos, "god."

Anonymous
8 years ago

termagant

[TUR-muh-guhnt]

noun:
1. A scolding, nagging, bad-tempered woman; a shrew.

adjective:
1. Overbearing; shrewish; scolding.

Termagant comes from Middle English Termagaunt, alteration of Tervagant, from Old French. Termagant was an imaginary Muslim deity represented in medieval morality plays as extremely violent and turbulent. By the sixteenth century, termagant was used for a boisterous, brawling, turbulent person of either sex, but eventually it came to refer only to women.

Anonymous
8 years ago

credulous

[KREJ-uh-lus]

adjective:
1. Ready or inclined to believe on slight or uncertain evidence.
2. Based on or proceeding from a disposition to believe too readily.

Credulous derives from Latin credulus, "believing easily," from credere, "to believe."

Anonymous
8 years ago

supplant

[suh-PLANT]

transitive verb:
1. To take the place of (another), especially through intrigue or underhanded tactics; as, a rival supplants another.
2. To take the place of and serve as a substitute for.

Supplant derives from Latin supplantare, "to put one's foot under another, to throw down a person by tripping up his heels," from sub-, "under" + plantare, "to stamp the ground with the foot," from planta, "the sole of the foot."

8 years ago

putsch

[pooch]

–noun a plotted revolt or attempt to overthrow a government, esp. one that depends upon suddenness and speed.

Anonymous
8 years ago

rivulet

 [RIV-yuh-lut]

 noun:
A small stream or brook; a streamlet

Rivulet is from Italian rivoletto, diminutive of rivolo, from Latin rivulus, diminutive of rivus, "a brook, a stream."

Anonymous
8 years ago

abecedarian

[ay-bee-see-DAIR-ee-uhn]

 noun:
1. One who is learning the alphabet; hence, a beginner.
2. One engaged in teaching the alphabet.

adjective:
1. Pertaining to the letters of the alphabet.
2. Arranged alphabetically.
3. Rudimentary; elementary.

 Abecedarian derives from Latin abecedarius, from the first four letters of the alphabet.

Anonymous
8 years ago

toper

[TOH-puhr]

 noun:
One who drinks frequently or to excess

Toper is formed from the verb tope, "to drink," originally an interjection used in proposing a toast, from French tope!, "agreed!" from toper, "to cover a stake in playing at dice, to accept an offer, to agree."

Anonymous
8 years ago

deign

 [DAYN]

 intransitive verb


1. To think worthy; to condescend -- followed by an infinitive.
2. To condescend to give or bestow; to stoop to furnish; to grant.

 Deign comes from Old French deignier, "to regard as worthy," from Latin dignari, from dignus, "worthy." It is related to dignity, "the quality or state of being worthy."

Anonymous
8 years ago

presentiment   

[prih-ZEN-tuh-muhnt] 

noun:
A sense that something will or is about to happen; a premonition.

Presentiment derives from Latin praesentire, "to feel beforehand," from prae-, "before" + sentire, "to feel."

8 years ago

empyrean

em-py-REE-uhn; -PEER-ee-

 noun:

1. The highest heaven, in ancient belief usually thought to be a realm of pure fire or light.
2. Heaven; paradise.
3. The heavens; the sky.

adjective:

1. Of or pertaining to the empyrean of ancient belief.

:-) Betty!!! YAY
8 years ago

Rusticate

[ruhs-ti-keyt]


To go into or reside in the country; to ruralize.

To require or compel to reside in the country; to banish or send away temporarily; to impose rustication on.

Anonymous
8 years ago

Behoove v.

(bi hoov)

to be necessary or proper for, as for moral or ethical considerations

to be worthwhile, as for personal profit or advantage

to be needful, proper or due.

8 years ago

Undulation

[uhn-juh-ley-shuhn]

a waving motion or vibration

8 years ago

Quotidian

[kwoh-tid-ee-uhn]

 daily usual or customary; everyday ordinary; commonplace, something recurring daily.

8 years ago

Pinto

[pin-toh]

Lit., painted; hence, piebald; mottled; pied.

Any pied animal; esp., a pied or "painted" horse.

8 years ago

lamina

[lam-uh-nuh]

a thin plate, scale, or layer

8 years ago

Claustrum

[klaw-struh m]

A thin lamina of gray matter in each cerebral hemisphere of the brain of man.

8 years ago

Avarice

[av-er-is]

An excessive or inordinate desire of gain; greediness after wealth; covetousness; cupidity.

An inordinate desire for some supposed good.

8 years ago

Sublunary

[suhb-loo-ner-ee]

Situated beneath the moon; hence, of or pertaining to this world; terrestrial; earthly.

8 years ago

Thaumaturgy

[thaw-muh-tur-jee]

The act or art of performing something wonderful; magic; legerdemain.

8 years ago

Malleable
[mal-ee-uh-buhl]

Capable of being extended or shaped by beating with a hammer, or by the pressure of rollers; -- applied to metals.

8 years ago

Opus
[oh-puhs]

A work; a musical composition.

one of the compositions of a composer, usually numbered according to the order of publication.

8 years ago

Paucity


[paw-si-tee]

Fewness; smallness of number; scarcity.
Smallnes of quantity; exiguity; insufficiency; as, paucity of blood.

8 years ago

Fiat  

[fee-aht]

An authoritative command or order to do something; an effectual decree.

A warrant of a judge for certain processes.

An authority for certain proceedings given by the Lord Chancellor's signature.

8 years ago

Luxuriant

[luhg-zhoor-ee-uh,nt]

adjective

Exuberant in growth; rank; excessive; very abundant; as, a luxuriant growth of grass; luxuriant foliage.

Excessively florid or elaborate.

Marked by or displaying luxury

Word of the day
8 years ago
| Blue Label

Ethnology [eth-nol-uh-jee]

(Greek ethnos: people)

The science which treats of the division of mankind into races, their origin, distribution, and relations, and the peculiarities which characterize them.

This topic is closed