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Anonymous
6 years ago

reprobate    [REP-ruh-bayt]

 

noun, adjective:
1. a very wicked, unprincipled person; scoundrel

 

adjective:
1. very wicked; unprincipled

 

verb:
1. to disapprove; condemn, censure

 

noun:
1. a person predestined to damnation, rejected by God

 

adjective:
1. rejected by God; damned

 

verb:
1. to reject from salvation; predestine to eternal punishment

 

by 1545, "rejected as worthless," from Late Latin reprobatus, pp. of reprobare "disapprove, reject, condemn," from Latin re- "opposite of, reversal of previous condition" + probare "prove to be worthy.". The noun is recorded from 1545, "one rejected by God." Sense of "abandoned or unprincipled person" is from 1592. Earliest form of the word in English was a verb, meaning "to disapprove" (1432).

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

escutcheon    [ih-SKUHCH-uhn]

 

noun:
1. a shield decorated with a coat of arms
2. the protective metal plate around a keyhole and lock, drawer handle or pull, light switch, etc.
3. the panel on a ship's stern bearing her name

 

by 1480, from Old North French escuchon, variant of Old French escusson, from Latin scutum "shield"

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

Lucullan    [loo-KUHL-uhn]

 

adjective:
rich; magnificent and luxurious

 

by 1857, from Latin Lucullanus for Licinius Lucullus, a Roman general famous for his wealth and the luxury of his banquets

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

amatory    [AM-uh-tor-ee; -tohr-]

 

adjective:
of love; expressing love, especially sexual

 

by 1599, from Latin amatorius "of or pertaining to love," from Latin amator "lover"

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

adduce    [uh-DOOS; -DYOOS]

 

verb:
to offer as a reason in support of an argument; bring up as an example; give as proof or evidence; cite

 

by 1616, from Latin adducere "lead to, bring to," from ad- "to" + ducere "to lead"

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

soiree    [swah-RAY]

 

noun:
an evening party or social gathering

 

by 1793, from French soirée, from soir "evening," from Old French soir, from Latin sero (adv.) "late, at a late hour," from serum "late hour," neuter of serus "late"

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

intimation    [in-tuh-MAY-shuhn]

 

noun:
an indirect or slight suggestion; hint

 

From Late Latin intimationem "action of intimating," from intimare "to impress (upon), make known".

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

horripilation    [haw-rip-uh-LAY-shuhn; ho-]

 

noun:
the act or process of the hair bristling on the skin, as from cold or fear; goose flesh

 

From Latin horripilatio, from horripilare "to bristle" + pilus "hair".

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

epicure    [EP-ih-kyur]

 

noun:
1. a person who enjoys eating and drinking and who is very particular in choosing fine foods and beverages; gourmet
2. a person who is fond of luxury and pleasure

 

c.1380, "follower of Epicurus," from Latin Epicurus, from Greek Epicouros (341-270 B.C.E.), the Athenian philosopher who taught that pleasure is the highest good and identified virtue as the greatest pleasure; the first lesson recalled, the second forgotten, and the name used pejoratively for "one who gives himself up to sensual pleasure" (1641), especially "glutton, sybarite" (1774). Epicurus's school opposed by Stoics, who first gave his name a reproachful sense.

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

aquiline    [AK-wuh-lyn; -lin]

 

adjective:
1. curved like an eagle's beak
2. of or like an eagle

 

1646, from Latin aquilinus "of or like an eagle," from aquila "eagle." Originally in English, referring to long, hooked noses.

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

addle    [AD-'l]

 

verb:
1. to make or become muddled or confused
2. to make or become rotten or putrid

 

Used in noun phrase addle egg (c.1250) "egg that does not hatch, rotten egg," literally "urine egg," a loan translation of Latin ovum urinum, which is itself an erroneous loan translation of Greek ourion oon "putrid egg," literally "wind egg," from ourios "of the wind" (confused by Roman writers with ourios "of urine," from ouron "urine"). Because of this usage, the noun in English was taken as an adjective from c. 1600, meaning "putrid," and thence given a figurative extension to "empty, vain, idle," also "confused, muddled, unsound" (1706). The verb followed.

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

gloaming    [GLOH-ming]

 

noun:
Twilight; dusk.

 

Gloaming comes from Old English glomung, from glom, "dusk."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

hubris    [HYOO-bruhs]

 

noun:
Overbearing pride or presumption.

 

Hubris comes from Greek hybris, "excessive pride, wanton violence."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

bivouac    [BIV-wak, BIV-uh-wak]

 

noun:
1. An encampment for the night, usually under little or no shelter.

 

intransitive verb:
1. To encamp for the night, usually under little or no shelter.

 

Bivouac comes from French bivouac, from German Beiwache, "a watching or guarding," from bei, "by, near" + wachen, "to watch."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

execrable    [EK-sih-kruh-buhl]

 

adjective:
1. Deserving to be execrated; detestable; abominable.
2. Extremely bad; of very poor quality; very inferior.

 

Execrable derives from Latin exsecrabilis, execrabilis, from exsecrari, execrari, "to execrate, to curse," from ex-, "out of, away from, outside of" + sacer, "sacred."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

synecdoche    [si-NEK-duh-kee]

 

noun:
a figure of speech by which a part is put for the whole or whole for a part or general for the special or vice versa

 

By 1388, from Middle Latin synodoche, from Late Latin synecdoche, from Greek synekdokhe, literally "a receiving together or jointly," from synekdekhesthai "supply a thought or word, take with something else," from syn- "with" + ek "out" + dekhesthai "to receive," related to dokein "seem good".

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

bailiwick    [BAY-luh-wik]

 

noun:
1. A person's specific area of knowledge, authority, interest, skill, or work.
2. The office or district of a bailiff.

 

Bailiwick comes from Middle English baillifwik, from baillif, "bailiff" (ultimately from Latin bajulus, "porter, carrier") + wik, "town," from Old English wic, from Latin vicus, "village."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

misprize    [mis-PRYZ]

 

transitive verb:
1. To hold in contempt.
2. To undervalue.

 

Misprize comes from Middle French mesprisier, from mes-, "amiss, wrong" + prisier, "to appraise."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

waylay    [WAY-lay]

 

transitive verb:
1. To lie in wait for and attack from ambush.
2. To approach or stop (someone) unexpectedly.

 

Waylay comes from way (from Old English weg) + lay (from Old English lecgan).

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

otiose    [OH-shee-ohs; OH-tee-]

 

adjective:
1. Ineffective; futile.
2. Being at leisure; lazy; indolent; idle.
3. Of no use.

 

Otiose is from Latin otiosus, "idle, at leisure," from otium, "leisure."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

sobriquet    [SO-brih-kay; -ket; so-brih-KAY; -KET]

noun:
A nickname; an assumed name; an epithet.

 

Sobriquet is from the French, from Old French soubriquet, "a chuck under the chin, hence, an affront, a nickname."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

euphonious    [yoo-FOH-nee-uhs]

 

adjective:
Pleasing or sweet in sound; smooth-sounding.

 

Euphonious comes from Greek euphonos, "sweet-voiced," from eu-, "well" (hence "sweetly") + phonos, from phone, "voice, sound." The noun form is euphony.

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

legerdemain    [lej-ur-duh-MAIN]

 

noun:
1. Sleight of hand.
2. A display of skill, trickery, or artful deception.

 

Legerdemain is from Old French leger de main, literally "light of hand": leger, "light" + de, "of" + main, "hand."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

aficionado    [uh-fish-ee-uh-NAH-doh]

 

noun:
An enthusiastic admirer; a fan.

 

Aficionado derives from Spanish aficionar, "to induce a liking for," from afición, "a liking for."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

circumlocution    [sir-kuhm-loh-KYOO-shuhn]

 

noun:
The use of many words to express an idea that might be expressed by few; indirect or roundabout language.

 

Circumlocution comes from Latin circumlocutio, circumlocution-, from circum, "around" + loquor, loqui, "to speak."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

littoral    [LIH-tuh-rul]

 

adjective:
1. Of, relating to, or on a coastal or shore region, especially a seashore.

 

noun:
1. A coastal region, especially the zone between the limits of high and low tides.

 

Littoral derives from Latin littoralis, litoralis, from litor-, litus, "the seashore."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

slugabed    [SLUHG-uh-bed]

 

noun:
One who stays in bed until a late hour; a sluggard.

 

Slugabed is from slug, "sluggard" + abed, "in bed."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

fettle    [FET-l]

 

noun:
A state or condition of fitness or order; state of mind; spirits -- often used in the phrase "in fine fettle."

 

Fettle is from Middle English fetlen, "to set in order," originally "to gird up," from Old English fetel, "a girdle."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

capitulate   [kuh-PICH-uh-layt]

 

intransitive verb:
To surrender under agreed conditions.

 

We say "capitulate" because the terms (of surrender) were drawn up in capitula, which is Latin for "chapters." Chapter itself is related to capitulate.

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

melee    [MAY-lay; may-LAY]

 

noun:
1. A fight or hand-to-hand struggle in which the combatants are mingled in one confused mass.
2. A confused conflict or mingling.

 

Melee is from the French mêlée, from the past participle of Old French mesler, "to mix," ultimately from Latin miscere, "to mix." It is related to medley, "a jumbled assortment; a mixture."

 



This post was modified from its original form on 26 Sep, 20:16
Anonymous
6 years ago

scion    [SY-uhn]

 

noun:
1. A detached shoot or twig of a plant used for grafting.
2. Hence, a descendant; an heir.

 

Scion derives from Old French cion, of Germanic origin.

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

undulate    [UN-juh-layt; UN-dyuh-]

 

intransitive:
To move in, or have, waves; to vibrate; to wave; as, undulating air.

 

Undulate derives from Latin undulare, from undula, a little wave, from unda, a wave.

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

proponent    [pruh-POH-nuhnt]

 

noun:
One who argues in support of something; an advocate; a supporter.

 

Proponent is from the present participle of Latin proponere, "to put forth," from pro-, "forth" + ponere, "to put."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

misprize    [mis-PRYZ]

 

transitive verb:
1. To hold in contempt.
2. To undervalue.

 

Misprize comes from Middle French mesprisier, from mes-, "amiss, wrong" + prisier, "to appraise."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

vociferous    [voh-SIF-uhr-uhs]

 

adjective:
Making a loud outcry; clamorous; noisy.

 

Vociferous derives from Latin vociferari, "to shout, to cry out" from vox, "voice" + ferre, "to carry."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

disconcert    [dis-kuhn-SURT]

 

transitive verb:
1. To disturb the composure of.
2. To throw into disorder or confusion; as, "the emperor disconcerted the plans of his enemy."

 

Disconcert is derived from Old French desconcerter, from des-, "dis-" + concerter, from Old Italian concertare, "to act together, to agree."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

suffuse    [suh-FYOOZ

 

transitive verb:
To spread through or over in the manner of fluid or light; to flush.

 

Suffuse comes from the past participle of Latin suffundere, "to overspread; to suffuse," from sub-, "under" + fundere, "to pour."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

auspicious    [aw-SPISH-uhs]

 

adjective:
1. Giving promise of success, prosperity, or happiness; predicting good; as, "an auspicious beginning."
2. Prosperous; fortunate; as, "auspicious years."

 

Auspicious derives from Latin auspicium, "an omen, a sign," from auspex, "one who observes or looks at the habits of birds for purposes of divination," from avis, "bird" + specere, "to look, to look at."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

hoary    [HOR-ee]

 

adjective:
1. White or gray with age; as, "hoary hairs."
2. Ancient; extremely old; remote in time past.

 

Hoary derives from Middle English hor, from Old English har, "gray; old (and gray-haired)."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

evanescent    [ev-uh-NES-unt]

 

adjective:
Liable to vanish or pass away like vapor; fleeting.

 

Evanescent is from Latin evanescere, "to vanish," from e-, "from, out of" + vanescere, "to disappear," from vanus, "empty."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

torrid    [TOR-uhd]

 

adjective:
1. Violenty hot; drying or scorching with heat; burning; parching; as, "torrid heat."
2. Characterized by intense emotion; as, "a torrid love affair."
3. Emotionally charged and vigorously energetic; as, "a torrid dance."

 

Torrid derives from Latin torridus, parched, burnt, dry, from torreo, torrere, to burn, parch, dry up with heat or thirst. The noun form of the word is torridness or torridity.

Anonymous
6 years ago

regale    [rih-GAY(uh)L]

 

transitive verb:
1. To entertain with something that delights.
2. To entertain sumptuously with fine food and drink.

intransitive verb:
1. To feast.

noun:
1. A sumptuous feast.
2. A choice food; a delicacy.
3. Refreshment.

 

Regale comes from French régaler, "to entertain." It is related to gallant.

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

cosmopolite    [koz-MOP-uh-lyt]

 

noun:
1. One who is at home in every place; a citizen of the world; a cosmopolitan person.
2. (Ecology) An organism found in most parts of the world.

 

Cosmopolite comes from Greek kosmopolites, from kosmos, "world" + polites, "citizen," from polis, "city."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

plaintive    [PLAYN-tiv]

 

adjective:
Expressive of sorrow or melancholy; mournful; sad.

 

Plaintive derives from Old French plainte, "complaint," from Latin planctus, past participle of plangere, "to strike (one's breast), to lament."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

bevy    [BEV-ee]

 

noun:

1. A group; an assembly or collection.

2. A flock of birds, especially quails or larks; also, a herd of roes.

 

Bevy comes from Middle English bevey. It perhaps originally signified a drinking company, possibly deriving from Old French beivre, "to drink," from Latin bibere.

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

immolate    [IM-uh-layt]

 

transitive verb:
1. To sacrifice; to offer in sacrifice; to kill as a sacrificial victim.
2. To kill or destroy, often by fire.

 

Immolate comes from the past participle of Latin immolare, "to sacrifice; originally, to sprinkle a victim with sacrificial meal," from in- + mola, "grits or grains of spelt coarsely ground and mixed with salt."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

glower    [GLAU-uhr]

 

intransitive verb:

1. To look or stare angrily or with a scowl.

 

noun:

1. An angry or scowling look or stare.

 

Glower is from Middle English gloren, perhaps ultimately of Scandinavian origin.

Anonymous
6 years ago

comestible    [kuh-MES-tuh-buhl]

 

adjective:

1. Suitable to be eaten; edible.

 

noun:

1. Something suitable to be eaten; food.

 

Comestible comes from Late Latin comestibilis, from comestus, from comesus, past participle of comedere, "to eat up, to consume," from com-, intensive prefix + edere, "to eat."

Anonymous
6 years ago

fop    [FOP]

noun:
A man who is overly concerned with or vain about his dress and appearance; a dandy.

 

Fop comes from Middle English fop, foppe, "a fool." The adjective form is foppish.

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

redress    [rih-DRES]

 

transitive verb:
1. To put in order again; to set right; to emend; to revise.
2. To set right, as a wrong; to repair, as an injury; to make amends for; to remedy; to relieve from.
3. To make amends or compensation to; to relieve of anything unjust or oppressive; to bestow relief upon.

 

noun:
1. The act of redressing; a making right; reformation; correction; amendment.
2. A setting right, as of wrong, injury, or oppression; as, the redress of grievances; hence, relief; remedy; reparation; indemnification.

 

Redress comes from French, redresser, to straighten, from re-, re- + dresser, to arrange.

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

chthonic    [THONE-ik]

 

adjective:
Dwelling in or under the earth; also, pertaining to the underworld.

 

Chthonic comes from khthón, the Greek word for earth.

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

naif    [nah-EEF; ny-]

 

adjective:
1. Naive.

 

noun:
1. A naive or inexperienced person.

 

Naif comes from French, from Old French naif, "naive, natural, just born," from Latin nativus, "native, rustic," literally "born, inborn, natural," from Latin nativus, "inborn, produced by birth," from natus, past participle of nasci, "to be born."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

peregrination    [pehr-uh-gruh-NAY-shun]

 

noun:
A traveling from place to place; a wandering.

 

Peregrination comes from Latin peregrinatio, from peregrinari, "to stay or travel in foreign countries," from peregre, "in a foreign country, abroad," from per, "through" + ager, "land."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

berate    [bih-RAYT]

 

transitive verb:
To scold severely or angrily.

 

Berate is from be-, "thoroughly" + rate, "to scold, to chide," from Middle English raten.

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

comity    [KOM-uh-tee]

 

noun:
1. A state of mutual harmony, friendship, and respect, especially between or among nations or people; civility.
2. The courteous recognition by one nation of the laws and institutions of another.
3. The group of nations observing international comity.

 

Comity is from Latin comitas, from comis, "courteous."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

foment    [foh-MENT; FOH-ment]

 

transitive verb:
1. To nurse to life or activity; to incite; to abet; to instigate; -- often in a bad sense.

 

noun:
1. Fomentation; the act of fomenting.
2. State of excitation.

 

Foment is from Latin fomentum, "fomentation," from fovere, "to warm, to foster, to encourage."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

Hobson's choice    [HOB-suhnz-CHOIS]

 

noun:
A choice without an alternative; the thing offered or nothing.

 

The origin of the term Hobson's choice is said to be in the name of one Thomas Hobson (ca. 1544-1631), at Cambridge, England, who kept a livery stable and required every customer to take either the horse nearest the stable door or none at all.

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

juju    [JOO-joo]

 

noun:
1. An object superstitiously believed to embody magical powers.
2. The power associated with a juju.

 

Juju is of West African origin, akin to Hausa djudju, fetish, evil spirit.

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

bruit    [BROOT]

 

transitive verb:
To report; to noise abroad.

 

Bruit comes from Old French, from the past participle of bruire, "to roar."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

aestival    [ES-tuh-vuhl]

 

adjective:
Of or belonging to the summer; as, aestival diseases. [Spelled also estival.]

 

From the Latin æstas, summer.

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

knell    [NEL]

 

verb:
1. The stoke of a bell tolled at a funeral or at the death of a person; a death signal; a passing bell; hence, figuratively, a warning of, or a sound indicating, the passing away of anything.

 

intransitive verb:
1. To sound as a knell; especially, to toll at a death or funeral; hence, to sound as a warning or evil omen.

 

From the Old English cnyll, cnell, "the sound of bells."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

philter    [FIL-tur]

 

noun:
1. A potion or charm supposed to cause the person taking it to fall in love.
2. A potion or charm believed to have magic power.

 

transitive verb:
1. To enchant or bewitch with or as if with a magic potion or charm.

 

Philter is derived from Greek philtron, from philein, "to love," from philos, "dear, loving."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

supernumerary    [soo-puhr-NOO-muh-rair-ee; -NYOO-]

 

adjective:
1. Exceeding the stated, standard, or prescribed number.
2. Exceeding what is necessary or desired; superfluous.

 

noun:
1. A supernumerary person or thing.
2. An actor without a speaking part, as a walk-on or an extra in a crowd scene.

 

Supernumerary is from Latin supernumerarius, from super, "over" + numerus, "number."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

blackguard    [BLAG-uhrd]

 

noun:
1. A rude or unscrupulous person; a scoundrel.
2. A person who uses foul or abusive language.

 

adjective:
1. Scurrilous; abusive; low; worthless; vicious; as, "blackguard language."

 

transitive verb:
1. To revile or abuse in scurrilous language.

 

Blackguard is from black + guard. The term originally referred to the lowest kitchen servants of a court or of a nobleman's household. They had charge of pots and pans and kitchen other utensils, and rode in wagons conveying these during journeys from one residence to another. Being dirtied by this task, they were jocularly called the "black guard."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

lackadaisical    [lack-uh-DAY-zih-kuhl]

 

adjective:
Lacking spirit or liveliness; showing lack of interest; languid; listless.

 

Lackadaisical comes from the expression lackadaisy, a variation of lackaday, itself a shortening of "alack the (or a) day!"

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

enervate    [EN-ur-vayt]

 

transitive verb:
1. To deprive of vigor, force, or strength; to render feeble; to weaken.
2. To reduce the moral or mental vigor of.

 

Enervate is from the past participle of Latin enervare, "to remove the sinews from, to weaken," from e-, ex-, "out of, from" + nervus, "sinew."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

provenance    [PROV-uh-nuhn(t)s]

 

noun:
Origin; source.

 

Provenance comes from French, from provenant, present participle of provenir, "to originate," ultimately from Latin provenire, from pro-, "forth" + venire, "to come."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

vexillology    [vek-sil-AHL-uh-jee]

 

noun:
The study of flags.

 

From Latin vexillum, "flag" + (Greek) -logy (from logos, " word, discourse").

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

asperity    [as-PAIR-uh-tee]

 

noun:

1. Roughness of surface; unevenness.

2. Roughness or harshness of sound; a quality that grates upon the ear.

3. Roughness of manner; severity; harshness.

 

Asperity comes from Latin asperitas, from asper, "rough." It is related to exasperate, "to irritate in a high degree," from ex- (here used intensively) + asperatus, past participle of asperare, "to roughen," from asper.

Anonymous
6 years ago

spoony    [SPOO-nee]

 

adjective:
1. Foolish; silly; excessively sentimental.
2. Foolishly or sentimentally in love.

 

Spoony is from the slang term spoon, meaning "a simpleton or a silly person."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

obeisance    [oh-BEE-suhn(t)s; oh-BAY-suhn(t)s]

 

noun:
1. An expression of deference or respect, such as a bow or curtsy.
2. Deference, homage.

 

Obeisance comes from Old French obeissance, from obeissant, present participle of obeir, to obey, from Latin oboedire, to listen to, from ob-, to + audire, to hear. The adjective form is obeisant.

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

panoply    [PAN-uh-plee]

 

noun:
1. A splendid or impressive array.
2. Ceremonial attire.
3. A full suit of armor; a complete defense or covering.

 

Panoply is from Greek panoplia, "a full suit of armor," from pan, "all" + hoplia, "arms, armor," plural of hoplon, "implement, weapon."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

sesquipedalian    [ses-kwuh-puh-DAYL-yuhn]

 

adjective:
1. Given to or characterized by the use of long words.
2. Long and ponderous; having many syllables.

 

noun:
1. A long word.

 

Sesquipedalian comes from Latin sesquipedalis, "a foot and a half long, hence inordinately long," from sesqui, "one half more, half as much again" + pes, ped-, "a foot."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

pusillanimous    [pyoo-suh-LAN-uh-muhs]

 

adjective:
Lacking in courage and resolution; contemptibly fearful; cowardly.

 

Pusillanimous comes from Late Latin pusillanimis, from Latin pusillus, "very small, tiny, puny" + animus, "soul, mind."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

quondam    [KWAHN-duhm; KWAHN-dam]

 

adjective:
Having been formerly; former; sometime.

 

Quondam comes from the Latin quondam, "formerly," from quom, "when."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

extol    [ik-STOHL]

 

transitive verb:
To praise highly; to glorify; to exalt.

 

Extol derives from Latin extollere, "to lift up, praise," from ex-, "up from" + tollere, "to lift up, elevate."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

sempiternal    [sem-pih-TUR-nuhl]

 

adjective:
Of never ending duration; having beginning but no end; everlasting; endless.

 

Sempiternal comes from Medieval Latin sempiternalis, from Latin sempiternus, a contraction of semperaeternus, from semper, "always" + aeternus, "eternal."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

melange    [may-LAHNZH]

 

noun:
A mixture; a medley.

 

Melange derives from Old French meslance, from mesler, "to mix," ultimately from Latin miscere, "to mix."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

vituperation    [vy-too-puh-RAY-shuhn, -tyoo-]

 

noun:
1. The act or an instance of speaking abusively to or about.
2. Sustained and severely abusive language.

 

Vituperation comes from Latin vituperatio, from the past participle of vituperare, "to blame," from vitium, "a fault" + parare, "to prepare." The verb form is vituperate; the related adjective is vituperative. One who vituperates is a vituperator.

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

gamine    [gam-EEN; GAM-een]

 

noun:
1. A girl who wanders about the streets; an urchin.
2. A playfully mischievous girl or young woman.

 

Gamine comes from the French. A boy who wanders about the street is a gamin.

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

supernumerary    [soo-puhr-NOO-muh-rair-ee; -NYOO-]

 

adjective:
1. Exceeding the stated, standard, or prescribed number.
2. Exceeding what is necessary or desired; superfluous.

 

noun:
1. A supernumerary person or thing.
2. An actor without a speaking part, as a walk-on or an extra in a crowd scene.

 

Supernumerary is from Latin supernumerarius, from super, "over" + numerus, "number."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

insensate    [in-SEN-sayt; -sit]

 

adjective:
1. Lacking sensation or awareness; inanimate.
2. Lacking human feeling or sensitivity; brutal; cruel.
3. Lacking sense; stupid; foolish.

 

Insensate comes from Late Latin insensatus, from in-, "not" + sensatus, "gifted with sense, intelligent," from Latin sensus, "sense."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

malinger    [muh-LING-guhr]

 

intransitive verb:
To feign or exaggerate illness or inability in order to avoid duty or work.

 

Malinger derives from French malingre, "sickly," perhaps from Old French mal, "badly" + heingre, "lean, thin."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

tatterdemalion    [tat-uhr-dih-MAYL-yuhn; -MAY-lee-uhn]

 

noun:
1. A person dressed in tattered or ragged clothing; a ragamuffin.

 

adjective:
1. Tattered; ragged.

 

Tatterdemalion derives from tatter + -demalion, of unknown origin, though perhaps from Old French maillon, "long clothes, swadding clothes" or Italian maglia, "undershirt."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

anodyne    [AN-uh-dyn]

 

adjective:
1. Serving to relieve pain; soothing.
2. Not likely to offend; bland; innocuous.

 

noun:
1. A medicine that relieves pain.
2. Anything that calms, comforts, or soothes disturbed feelings.

 

Anodyne comes, via Latin, from Greek anodunos, "free from pain," from a-, an-, "without" + odune, "pain."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

mephitic    [muh-FIT-ik]

 

adjective:
1. Offensive to the smell; as, mephitic odors.
2. Poisonous; noxious.

 

Mephitic is the adjective form of mephitis, "a foul-smelling or noxious exhalation from the earth; a stench from any source," from the Latin.

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

fiduciary    [fih-DOO-shee-air-ee]

 

adjective:
1. Relating to the holding of something in trust for another.

noun:
1. Someone who stands in a special relation of trust, confidence, or responsibility in certain obligations to others; a trustee.

 

Fiduciary comes from Latin fiduciarius, from fiducia, "trust," and is related to faith and fidelity.

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

cupidity    [kyoo-PID-uh-tee]

 

noun:
Eager or excessive desire, especially for wealth; greed; avarice.

 

Cupidity ultimately comes from Latin cupiditas, from cupidus, "desirous," from cupere, "to desire." It is related to Cupid, the Roman god of love.

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

antediluvian    [an-tih-duh-LOO-vee-uhn]

 

adjective: 1. Of or relating to the period before the Biblical flood. 2. Antiquated; from or belonging to a much earlier time. noun: 1. One who lived before the Biblical flood. 2. A very old (or old-fashioned) person.

 

Antediluvian comes from Latin ante-, "before" + diluvium, "flood."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

puerile    [PYOO-uhr-uhl; PYOOR-uhl]

 

adjective:
Displaying or suggesting a lack of maturity; juvenile; childish.

 

Puerile comes from Latin puerilis, from puer, "child, boy."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

propound    [pruh-POWND]

 

transitive verb:
To offer for consideration; to put forward; to propose.

 

Propound is a variation of earlier propone, from Latin proponere, "to set forth, to propose," from pro, "for, before, in favor of" + ponere, "to put."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

contemn    [kuhn-TEM]

 

transitive verb:
To regard or treat with disdain or contempt; to scorn; to despise.

 

Contemn is derived from Latin contemnere, from com-, intensive prefix + temnere, "to despise."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

emolument    [ih-MOL-yuh-muhnt]

 

noun:
The wages or perquisites arising from office, employment, or labor; gain; compensation.

 

Emolument derives from Latin emolumentum, originally a sum paid to a miller for grinding out one's wheat, from molere, "to grind." It is related to molar, the "grinding" tooth.

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

troglodyte    [TROG-luh-dyt]

 

noun:
1. A member of a primitive people that lived in caves, dens, or holes; a cave dweller.
2. One who is regarded as reclusive, reactionary, out of date, or brutish.

 

Troglodyte comes from Latin Troglodytae, a people said to be cave dwellers, from Greek Troglodytai, from trogle, "a hole" + dyein, "to enter." The adjective form is troglodytic.

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

gustatory    [GUS-tuh-tor-ee]

 

adjective:
Of or pertaining to the sense of taste.

 

Gustatory derives from Latin gustatus, "taste," from gustare, "to taste, to take a little of." Other words that have the same root include disgust and gusto ("vigorous and enthusiastic enjoyment").

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

palaver    [puh-LAV-uhr; puh-LAH-vur]

 

noun:
1. Idle talk
2. Talk intended to beguile or deceive.
3. A parley usually between persons of different backgrounds or cultures or levels of sophistication; a talk; hence, a public conference and deliberation.

 

intransitive verb:
1. To talk idly.

 

transitive verb:
1. To flatter; to cajole.

 

Palaver derives from Late Latin parabola, "a proverb, a parable," from Greek parabole, from paraballein, "to compare," from para-, "beside" + ballein, "to throw."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

meticulous    [muh-TIK-yuh-luhs]

 

adjective:
Extremely or excessively careful about details.

 

Meticulous ultimately derives from Latin meticulosus "fearful" (from metus, "fear"). The present sense stems from French méticuleux "overscrupulous." In present day English, the word usually carries a more positive connotation and is synonymous with precise and punctilious.

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

dapple    [DAP-uhl]

 

noun:
1. A small contrasting spot or blotch.
2. A mottled appearance, especially of the coat of an animal (as a horse).

transitive verb:
1. To mark with patches of a color or shade; to spot.

intransitive verb:
1. To become dappled.

adjective:
1. Marked with contrasting patches or spots; dappled.

 

Dapple derives from Old Norse depill, "a spot."

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

tutelage    [TOO-tuhl-ij; TYOO-]

 

noun:
1. The act of guarding or protecting; guardianship; protection.
2. The state of being under a guardian or tutor.
3. Instruction, especially individual instruction accompanied by close attention and guidance.

 

Tutelage is from Latin tutela, "protection; guardian" (from the past participle of tueri, "to watch, to guard") + the suffix -age.

 

Anonymous
6 years ago

laconic    [luh-KON-ik]

adjective:
Using or marked by the use of a minimum of words; brief and pithy; brusque.

Laconic comes, via Latin, from Greek Lakonikos, "of or relating to a Laconian or Spartan," hence "terse," in the manner of the Laconians.

 



This post was modified from its original form on 02 Jul, 6:50
Anonymous
6 years ago

condign    [kuhn-DINE; KON-dine]

adjective:
Suitable to the fault or crime; deserved; adequate.

Condign ultimately derives from Latin condignus, "very worthy," from com-, here used intensively + dignus, "worthy."

Anonymous
6 years ago

indigent    [IN-dih-juhnt]

adjective:
Extremely poor; not having the necessities of life, such as food, clothing and shelter
.

Indigent derives from Latin indigens, indigent-, present participle of indigere, "to need."

Anonymous
6 years ago

interpolate    [in-TUR-puh-layt]

transitive verb:
1. To alter or corrupt (as a book or text) by the insertion of new or foreign matter.
2. To insert (material) into a text or conversation.
3. To insert between other elements or parts.
4. [Mathematics] to estimate a value of (a function) between two known values.

Interpolate comes from the past participle of Latin interpolare, "to polish up, to furbish, to vamp up; hence to falsify," from inter-, "between" + polire, "to polish."

intransitive verb:
1. To make insertions.

Anonymous
6 years ago

mazy    [MAY-zee]

adjective:
Resembling a maze in form or complexity; winding; intricate; confusing; perplexing.

Mazy is the adjective form of maze, which comes from Middle English mase, from masen, "to confuse, to daze," from Old English amasian, "to confound." It is related to amaze, which originally meant "to bewilder."

Anonymous
6 years ago

harbinger    [HAR-bin-juhr]

noun:
1. (Archaic) One who provides lodgings; especially, the officer of the English royal household who formerly preceded the court when traveling, to provide and prepare lodgings.
2. A forerunner; a precursor; one that presages or foreshadows what is to come.

transitive verb:
1. To signal the approach of; to presage; to be a harbinger of.

Harbinger, which originally signified a person sent ahead to arrange lodgings, derives from Middle English herbergeour, "one who supplies lodgings," from Old French herbergeor, from herbergier, "to provide lodging for," from herberge, "a lodging, an inn" (cp. modern French auberge), ultimately of Germanic origin.

Anonymous
6 years ago

Cockaigne    [kah-KAYN]

noun:
An imaginary land of ease and luxury.

Cockaigne comes from Middle English cokaygne, from Middle French (pais de) cocaigne "(land of) plenty," ultimately adapted or derived from a word meaning "cake."

Anonymous
6 years ago

forlorn    [fur-LORN; for-]

adjective:
1. Sad and lonely because deserted, abandoned, or lost.
2. Bereft; forsaken.
3. Wretched or pitiful in appearance or condition.
4. Almost hopeless; desperate.

Forlorn comes from Old English forleosan, "to abandon," from for- + leosan, "to lose."

Anonymous
6 years ago

glutinous    [GLOOT-nuhs]

adjective:
Of the nature of glue; resembling glue; sticky.

Glutinous derives from Latin glutinosus, from gluten, glutin-, "glue."

Anonymous
6 years ago

capacious    [kuh-PAY-shuhs]

adjective:
Able to contain much; roomy; spacious.

Capacious is derived from Latin capax, capac-, "able to hold or contain."

Anonymous
6 years ago

malediction    [mal-uh-DIK-shun]

noun:
A curse or execration.

Malediction comes from Latin maledictio, from maledicere, "to speak ill, to abuse," from Latin male, "badly" + dicere, "to speak, to say."

Anonymous
6 years ago

choler    [KOLL-ur; KOLE-ur]

noun:
Irritation of the passions; anger; wrath.

Choler is from Latin cholera, a bilious disease, from Greek kholera, from khole, bile.

Anonymous
6 years ago

renascent    [rih-NAS-uhnt]

adjective:
Springing or rising again into being; showing renewed vigor.

Renascent comes from Latin renascens, present participle of renasci, "to be born again," from re-, "again" + nasci, "to be born."

Anonymous
6 years ago

defenestrate    [dee-FEN-uh-strayt]

transitive verb:
To throw out of a window.

Defenestrate is derived from Latin de-, "out of" + fenestra, "window." The noun form is defenestration.

Anonymous
6 years ago

cogent    [KOH-juhnt]

adjective:
Having the power to compel conviction; appealing to the mind or to reason; convincing.

Cogent derives from Latin cogere, "to drive together, to force," from co-, "with, together" + agere, "to drive."

Anonymous
6 years ago

verdure    [VUR-jur]

noun:
Green; greenness; freshness of vegetation; as, the verdure of the meadows in June.

Verdure is from Old French verd, green, from Latin viridis.

Anonymous
6 years ago

dilatory    [DIL-uh-tor-ee]

adjective:
1. Tending to put off what ought to be done at once; given to procrastination.
2. Marked by procrastination or delay; intended to cause delay; -- said of actions or measures.

Dilatory is from Latin dilatorius, from dilator, "a dilatory person, a loiterer," from dilatus, past participle of differre, "to delay, to put off," from dis-, "apart, in different directions" + ferre, "to carry."

Anonymous
6 years ago

claque    [KLACK]

noun:
1. A group hired to applaud at a performance.
2. A group of fawning admirers.

Claque comes from French, from claquer, "to clap," ultimately of imitative origin.

Anonymous
6 years ago

prink    [PRINGK]

transitive verb:
1. To dress up; to deck for show.

intransitive verb:
1. To dress or arrange oneself for show; to primp.

Prink is probably an alteration of prank, from Middle English pranken, "to show off," perhaps from Middle Dutch pronken, "to adorn oneself," and from Middle Low German prunken (from prank, "display").

Anonymous
6 years ago

hyperbole    [hy-PUHR-buh-lee]

noun:
Extravagant exaggeration.

Hyperbole comes from Greek hyperbole, "excess," from hyperballein, "to exceed," from hyper, "beyond" + ballein, "to throw."

Anonymous
6 years ago

patrician    [puh-TRISH-un]

noun:
1. A member of one of the original citizen families of ancient Rome.
2. A person of high birth; a nobleman.
3. A person of refined upbringing, manners, and taste.

adjective:
1. Of or pertaining to the patrician families of ancient Rome.
2. Of, pertaining to, or appropriate to, a person of high birth; noble; not plebeian.
3. Befitting or characteristic of refined upbringing, manners, and taste.

Patrician derives from Latin patricius, from patres, "senators," plural of pater, "father."

Anonymous
6 years ago

surfeit    [SUR-fit]

noun:
1. An excessive amount or supply.
2. Overindulgence, as in food or drink.
3. Disgust caused by overindulgence or excess.

transitive verb:
1. To feed or supply to excess.

Surfeit is from Old French, from the past participle of surfaire, "to overdo," from sur-, "over" (from Latin super) + faire, "to do" (from Latin facere).

Anonymous
6 years ago

raconteur    [rack-on-TUR]

noun:
One who excels in telling stories and anecdotes.

Raconteur is from French, from raconter, "to relate, to tell, to narrate," from Old French, from re- + aconter.

Anonymous
6 years ago

minatory    [MIN-uh-tor-ee]

adjective:
Threatening; menacing.

Minatory derives from Latin minatorius, from minari, "to threaten." It is related to menace.

Anonymous
6 years ago

potentate    [POH-tuhn-tayt]

noun:
One who possesses great power or sway; a ruler, sovereign, or monarch.

Potentate derives from Late Latin potentatus, "a powerful person," from Latin potentatus, "power, especially political power; supremacy," from potens, "able, powerful," from posse, "to be able." It is related to potent, "powerful," and potential, "having possibility or capability."

Anonymous
6 years ago

repletion    [rih-PLEE-shun]

noun:
1. The condition of being completely filled or supplied.
2. Excessive fullness, as from overeating.

Repletion is derived from Latin replere, "to fill again, to fill up," from re- + plere, " to fill." Plenty is a related word.

Anonymous
6 years ago

tremulous    [TREM-yuh-luhs]

adjective:
1. Shaking; shivering; quivering; as, a tremulous motion of the hand or the lips; the tremulous leaf of the poplar.
2. Affected with fear or timidity; trembling.

Tremulous comes from Latin tremulus, from tremere, "to tremble."

Anonymous
6 years ago

lachrymose    [LAK-ruh-mohs]

adjective:
1. Generating or shedding tears; given to shedding tears; suffused with tears; tearful.
2. Causing or tending to cause tears.

Lachrymose is from Latin lacrimosus,"tearful, sorrowful", from lacrima, "tear".



This post was modified from its original form on 04 Jun, 7:06
Anonymous
6 years ago

bagatelle    [bag-uh-TEL]

noun:
1. A trifle; a thing of little or no importance.
2. A short, light musical or literary piece.
3. A game played with a cue and balls on an oblong table having cups or arches at one end.

Bagatelle derives from Italian bagattella, "a trifling matter; a bagatelle," perhaps ultimately from Latin baca, "a berry."

Anonymous
6 years ago

countermand    [KOWN-tuhr-mand; kown-tuhr-MAND]

transitive verb:
1. To revoke (a former command); to cancel or rescind by giving an order contrary to one previously given.
2. To recall or order back by a contrary order.

noun:
1. A contrary order.
2. Revocation of a former order or command.

Countermand derives from Old French contremander, from contre-, "counter" (from Latin contra) + mander, "to command" (from Latin mandare).

Anonymous
6 years ago

harridan    [HAIR-uh-din]

noun:
A worn-out strumpet; a vixenish woman; a hag.

Harridan probably comes from French haridelle, "a worn-out horse, a gaunt woman."

Anonymous
6 years ago

grandee    [gran-DEE]

noun:
1. A man of elevated rank or station.
2. In Spain or Portugal, a nobleman of the first rank.

Grandee comes from Spanish grande, from Latin grandis, "great, large, hence important, grand." Related words include grandeur, "the state or quality of being grand"; grandiose, "characterized by affectation of grandeur"; aggrandize, "to make great or greater"; and, of course, grand.

Anonymous
6 years ago

schadenfreude    [SHOD-n-froy-duh]

noun:
A malicious satisfaction obtained from the misfortunes of others.

Schadenfreude comes from the German, from Schaden, "damage" + Freude, "joy." It is often capitalized, as it is in German.

Anonymous
6 years ago

vehement    [VEE-uh-muhnt]

adjective:
1. Characterized by intensity of emotions or convictions, or forcefulness of expression.
2. Characterized by or acting with great force or energy; strong.

Vehement is from Latin vehemens, "violent, vehement, furious," perhaps from vehere, "to carry." The quality or state of being vehement is vehemence.

Anonymous
6 years ago

listless    [LIST-lis]

adjective:
Having no desire or inclination; indifferent; heedless; spiritless.
--LISTLESSLY, adverb -- LISTLESSNESS, noun

Listless is from Middle English listles, from liste (see entry for list), desire + -les, -less.

Anonymous
6 years ago

ruminate    [ROO-muh-nayt]

intransitive verb:
1. To chew the cud; to chew again what has been slightly chewed and swallowed."Cattle free to ruminate." --Wordsworth.
2. To think again and again; to muse; to meditate; to ponder; to reflect.

transitive verb:
1. To chew over again.
2. To meditate or ponder over; to muse on.

Ruminate derives from Latin ruminatus, past participle of ruminari, to chew the cud, to ruminate, to chew over again, from rumen, rumin-, throat.

Anonymous
6 years ago

aright    [uh-RYT]

adverb:
Rightly; correctly; properly; in a right way or manner.

Aright comes from Middle English, from Old English ariht, from a-, "on" + riht, "right."

Anonymous
6 years ago

cadge    [KAJ]

transitive verb:
1. To beg or obtain by begging; to sponge.

intransitive verb:
1. To beg; to sponge.

Cadge derives from Middle English cadgear, "a peddler, a huckster."

Anonymous
6 years ago

boulevardier    [boo-luh-var-DYAY; bul-uh-]

noun:
1. A frequenter of city boulevards, especially in Paris.
2. A sophisticated, worldly, and socially active man; a man who frequents fashionable places; a man-about-town.

Boulevardier is from French, from boulevard, from Old French bollevart, "rampart converted to a promenade," from Middle Low German bolwerk, "bulwark."

Anonymous
6 years ago

Potemkin village    [puh-TEM(P)-kin]

noun:
An impressive facade or display that hides an undesirable fact or state; a false front.

A Potemkin village is so called after Grigori Aleksandrovich Potemkin, who had elaborate fake villages built in order to impress Catherine the Great on her tours of the Ukraine and the Crimea in the 18th century.

Anonymous
6 years ago

obtrude    [uhb-TROOD; ob-]

transitive verb:
1. To thrust out; to push out.
2. To force or impose (one's self, remarks, opinions, etc.) on others with undue insistence or without solicitation.

intransitive verb:
1. To thrust upon a group or upon attention; to intrude.

Obtrude is from Latin obtrudere, "to thrust upon, to force," from ob, "in front of, before" + trudere, "to push, to thrust."

Anonymous
6 years ago

subfusc    [sub-FUHSK]

adjective:
Dark or dull in color; drab, dusky.

Subfusc comes from Latin subfuscus, "brownish, dark," from sub-, "under" + fuscus, "dark-colored."

Anonymous
6 years ago

paean   [PEE-uhn]

noun:
1. A joyous song of praise, triumph, or thanksgiving.
2. An expression of praise or joy.

Paean comes from Latin paean, "a hymn of thanksgiving, often addressed to god Apollo," from Greek paian, from Paia, a title of Apollo.

Anonymous
6 years ago

fetter    [FET-uhr]

noun:
1. A chain or shackle for the feet; a bond; a shackle.
2. Anything that confines or restrains; a restraint.

transitive verb:
1. To put fetters upon; to shackle or confine.
2. To restrain from progress or action; to impose restraints on; to confine.

Fetter is from Middle English feter, from Old English. It is related to foot.

Anonymous
6 years ago

umbrage    [UHM-brij]

noun:
1. Shade; shadow; hence, something that affords a shade, as a screen of trees or foliage.
2. a. A vague or indistinct indication or suggestion; a hint.
3. b. Reason for doubt; suspicion.
4. Suspicion of injury or wrong; offense; resentment.

Umbrage is derived from Latin umbra, "shade."

Anonymous
6 years ago

cavil    [KAV-uhl]

intransitive verb:
1. To raise trivial or frivolous objections; to find fault without good reason.

transitive verb:
1. To raise trivial objections to.

noun:
1. A trivial or frivolous objection.

Cavil comes from Latin cavillari, "to jeer, to quibble," from cavilla, "scoffing."

Anonymous
6 years ago

acumen    [uh-KYOO-muhn; AK-yuh-muhn]

noun:
Quickness of perception or discernment; shrewdness shown by keen insight.

Acumen comes from Latin acumen, "the sharp point of something; sharpness of understanding; cunning," from acuere, "to sharpen."

Anonymous
6 years ago

parsimonious    [par-suh-MOH-nee-uhs]

adjective:
Sparing in expenditure; frugal to excess.

Parsimonious is the adjective form of parsimony, from Latin parsimonia, "thrift, parsimony," from parsus, past participle of parcere, "to spare, to be sparing, to economize."

Anonymous
6 years ago

sentient    [SEN-shee-uhnt; -tee-; -shuhnt]

adjective:
1. Capable of perceiving by the senses; conscious.
2. Experiencing sensation or feeling.

Sentient comes from Latin sentiens, "feeling," from sentire, "to discern or perceive by the senses."

Anonymous
6 years ago

moiety    [MOY-uh-tee]

noun:
1. One of two equal parts; a half.
2. An indefinite part; a small portion or share.
3. One of two basic tribal subdivisions.

Moiety comes from Old French meitiet, from Late Latin medietas, from Latin medius, "middle."

Anonymous
6 years ago

contrite    [KON-tryt; kuhn-TRYT]

adjective:
1. Deeply affected with grief and regret for having done wrong; penitent; as, "a contrite sinner."
2. Expressing or arising from contrition; as, "contrite words."

Contrite derives from Latin conterere, "to rub away, to grind," hence "to obliterate, to abase," from con- + terere, "to rub, to rub away."

Anonymous
6 years ago

amalgam    [uh-MAL-guhm]

noun:
1. An alloy of mercury with another metal or metals; used especially (with silver) as a dental filling.
2. A mixture or compound of different things.

Amalgam comes from Old French amalgame, from Medieval Latin amalgama, probably from Greek malagma, "emollient," from malassein, "to soften," from malakos, "soft."

Anonymous
6 years ago

fustian    [FUHS-chuhn]

noun:
1. A kind of coarse twilled cotton or cotton and linen stuff, including corduroy, velveteen, etc.
2. An inflated style of writing or speech; pompous or pretentious language.

adjective:
1. Made of fustian.
2. Pompous; ridiculously inflated; bombastic.

Fustian derives from Old French fustaigne, from Medieval Latin fustaneum, but its precise roots beyond that point are uncertain.

Anonymous
6 years ago

disparate    [DIS-puh-rit; dis-PAIR-it]

adjective:
1. Fundamentally different or distinct in quality or kind.
2. Composed of or including markedly dissimilar elements.

Disparate comes from the past participle of Latin disparare, "to separate," from dis-, "apart" + parare, "to prepare."

Anonymous
6 years ago

sub rosa    [suhb-ROH-zuh]

adverb:
1. Secretly; privately; confidentially.

adjective:
1. Designed to be secret or confidential; secretive; private.

Sub rosa comes from the Latin, literally "under the rose," from the ancient association of the rose with confidentiality, the origin of which traces to a famous story in which Cupid gave Harpocrates, the god of silence, a rose to bribe him not to betray the confidence of Venus. Hence the ceilings of Roman banquet-rooms were decorated with roses to remind guests that what was spoken sub vino (under the influence of wine) was also sub rosa.

Anonymous
6 years ago

halcyon    [HAL-see-uhn]

noun:
1. A kingfisher.
2. A mythical bird, identified with the kingfisher, that was fabled to nest at sea about the time of the winter solstice and to calm the waves during incubation.

adjective:
1. Calm; quiet; peaceful; undisturbed; happy; as, "deep, halcyon repose."
2. Marked by peace and prosperity; as, "halcyon years."

Halcyon derives from Latin (h)alcyon, from Greek halkuon, a mythical bird, kingfisher. This bird was fabled by the Greeks to nest at sea, about the time of the winter solstice, and, during incubation, to calm the waves.

Anonymous
6 years ago

cloy    [KLOY]

transitive verb:
1. To weary by excess, especially of sweetness, richness, pleasure, etc.

intransitive verb:
1. To become distasteful through an excess usually of something originally pleasing.

Cloy is short for obsolete accloy, "to clog," alteration of Middle English acloien, "to lame," from Middle French encloer, "to drive a nail into," from Medieval Latin inclavare, from Latin in, "in" + clavus, "nail."

Anonymous
6 years ago

lenity    [LEN-uh-tee]

noun:
The state or quality of being lenient; mildness; gentleness of treatment; leniency.

Lenity comes from Latin lenitas, from lenis, "soft, mild."

Anonymous
6 years ago

gimcrack    [JIM-krak]

noun:
1. A showy but useless or worthless object; a gewgaw.

adjective:
1. Tastelessly showy; cheap; gaudy.

The origin of gimcrack is uncertain. It is perhaps an alteration of Middle English gibecrake, "a slight or flimsy ornament."

Anonymous
6 years ago

maelstrom    [MAYL-struhm]

noun:
1. A large, powerful, or destructive whirlpool.
2. Something resembling a maelstrom; a violent, disordered, or turbulent state of affairs.

Maelstrom comes from obsolete Dutch maelstroom, from malen, "to grind, hence to whirl round," + stroom, "stream."

Anonymous
6 years ago

posit    [POZ-it]

transitive verb:
1. To assume as real or conceded.
2. To propose as an explanation; to suggest.
3. To dispose or set firmly or fixedly.

Posit is from Latin positus, past participle of ponere, "to put, to place, to set."

Anonymous
6 years ago

confluence    [KON-floo-uhn(t)s]

noun:
1. A flowing or coming together; junction.
2. The place where two rivers, streams, etc. meet.
3. A flocking or assemblage of a multitude in one place; a large collection or assemblage.

Confluence is from Latin confluens, "flowing together," from confluere, "to flow together," from con-, "with, together" + fluere, "to flow."

Anonymous
6 years ago

epigone    [EP-uh-gohn]

noun:
An inferior imitator, especially of some distinguished writer, artist, musician, or philosopher.

Epigone derives from Greek epigonos, from epigignesthai, to be born after, from epi-, "upon, after" + gignesthai, "to be born." The adjective form is epigonic.

Anonymous
6 years ago

winsome    [WIN-suhm]

adjective:
1. Cheerful; merry; gay; light-hearted.
2. Causing joy or pleasure; agreeable; pleasant.

Winsome is from Old English wynsum, from wynn, "joy" + -sum (equivalent to Modern English -some), "characterized by."

Anonymous
6 years ago

ubiquitous    [yoo-BIK-wih-tuhs]

adjective:
Existing or being everywhere, or in all places, at the same time.

Ubiquitous derives, via French, from Latin ubique, "everywhere," from ubi, "where." The noun form is ubiquity.

Anonymous
6 years ago

lionize    [LY-uh-nyz]

transitive verb:
To treat or regard as an object of great interest or importance.

Lionize, comes from lion, in the sense of "a person of great interest or importance."

Anonymous
6 years ago

chimera    [ky-MIR-uh]

noun:
1. (Capitalized) A fire-breathing she-monster represented as having a lion's head, a goat's body, and a serpent's tail.
2. Any imaginary monster made up of grotesquely incongruous parts.
3. An illusion or mental fabrication; a grotesque product of the imagination.
4. An individual, organ, or part consisting of tissues of diverse genetic constitution, produced as a result of organ transplant, grafting, or genetic engineering.

Chimera comes from Latin chimaera, from Greek chimaira "she-goat, chimera."

Anonymous
6 years ago

lambaste    [lam-BAYST]

transitive verb:
1. To give a thrashing to; to beat severely.
2. To scold sharply; to attack verbally; to berate.

Lambaste is perhaps from lam, "to beat soundly; to thrash" + baste, "to beat vigorously."

Anonymous
6 years ago

portent    [POR-tent]

noun:
1. A sign of a coming event or calamity; an omen.
2. Prophetic or menacing significance.
3. Something amazing; a marvel.

Portent comes from Latin portentum, from portendere, "to stretch out before or into the future, to predict," from por- (variant of pro-), "before" + tendere, "to stretch out." Related words include portend, "to give an omen or sign of," and portentous, "ominous, foreboding."

Anonymous
6 years ago

inveigle    [in-VAY-guhl; -VEE-]

transitive verb:
1. To persuade by ingenuity or flattery; to entice.
2. To obtain by ingenuity or flattery.

Inveigle comes from Anglo-French enveogler, from Old French aveugler, "to blind, to lead astray as if blind," from aveugle, "blind," from Medieval Latin ab oculis, "without eyes."

Anonymous
6 years ago

roister    [ROY-stur]

intransitive verb:
1. To engage in boisterous merrymaking; to revel; to carouse.
2. To bluster; to swagger.

Roister is probably from Middle French rustre, "a boor, a clown; clownish," from Latin rusticus, "rustic," from rus, "country."

Anonymous
6 years ago

objurgate    [OB-juhr-gayt]

transitive verb:
To express strong disapproval of; to criticize severely.

Objurgate comes from the past participle of Latin from objurgare, "to scold, to blame," from ob-, "against" + jurgare, "to dispute, to quarrel, to sue at law," from jus, jur-, "law" + -igare (from agere, "to lead").

Anonymous
6 years ago

miasma    [my-AZ-muh; mee-]

noun:
1. A vaporous exhalation (as of marshes or putrid matter) formerly thought to cause disease; broadly, a thick vaporous atmosphere or emanation.
2. A harmful or corrupting atmosphere or influence; also, an atmosphere that obscures; a fog.

Miasma comes from Greek miasma, "pollution," from miainein, "to pollute."

Anonymous
6 years ago

pin money    [pin money]

noun:
1. An allowance of money given by a husband to his wife for private and personal expenditures.
2. Money for incidental expenses.
3. A trivial sum.

Pin money originally referred to money given by husbands to their wives for the specific purpose of buying pins.

Anonymous
7 years ago

abulia    [uh-BOO-lee-uh; uh-BYOO-]

noun:
Loss or impairment of the ability to act or to make decisions.

Abulia derives from Greek a-, "without" + boule, "will." The adjective form is abulic.

Anonymous
7 years ago

caesura    [sih-ZHUR-uh; -ZUR-]

noun;
plural caesuras or caesurae sih-ZHUR-ee; -ZUR-ee:
1. A break or pause in a line of verse, usually occurring in the middle of a line, and indicated in scanning by a double vertical line; for example, "The proper study || of mankind is man" [Alexander Pope, An Essay on Man].
2. Any break, pause, or interruption.

Caesura comes from Latin caesura, "a cutting off, a division, a stop," from the past participle of caedere, "to cut."

Anonymous
7 years ago

pugnacious    [puhg-NAY-shuhs]

adjective:
Inclined to fight; combative; quarrelsome.

Pugnacious comes from Latin pugnare, "to fight," from pugnus, "fist."

Anonymous
7 years ago

afflatus    [uh-FLAY-tuhs]

noun:
A divine imparting of knowledge; inspiration.

Afflatus is from Latin afflatus, past participle of afflare, "to blow at or breathe on," from ad-, "at" + flare, "to puff, to blow." Other words with the same root include deflate (de-, "out of" + flare); inflate (in-, "into" + flare); soufflé, the "puffed up" dish (from French souffler, "to puff," from Latin sufflare, "to blow from below," hence "to blow up, to puff up," from sub-, "below" + flare); and flatulent.

Anonymous
7 years ago

voluble    [VOL-yuh-buhl]

adjective:
1. Characterized by a ready flow of speech.
2. Easily rolling or turning; rotating.
3. (Botany) Having the power or habit of turning or twining.

Voluble derives from Latin volubilis, "revolving, rolling, fluent," from volvere, "to roll."

Anonymous
7 years ago

importunate    [im-POR-chuh-nit]

adjective:
Troublesomely urgent; overly persistent in request or demand; unreasonably solicitous.

Importunate is derived from Latin importunus, "unsuitable, troublesome, (of character) assertive, insolent, inconsiderate."

Anonymous
7 years ago

camarilla    [kam-uh-RIL-uh; -REE-yuh]

noun:
A group of secret and often scheming advisers, as of a king; a cabal or clique.

Camarilla comes from Spanish, literally, "a small room," from Late Latin camera, "chamber" ("vault; arched roof" in Latin), from Greek kamara, "vault."

Anonymous
7 years ago

ostentation    [os-ten-TAY-shuhn]

noun:
Excessive or pretentious display; boastful showiness.

Ostentation comes from Latin ostentatio, ostentation-, from ostentare, "to display," frequentative of ostendere, "to hold out, to show," from ob-, obs-, "in front of, before," + tendere, "to stretch, to stretch out, to present."

Anonymous
7 years ago

bellwether    [BEL-weth-uhr]

noun:
A leader of a movement or activity; also, a leading indicator of future trends.

Bellwether is a compound of bell and wether, "a male sheep, usually castrated"; from the practice of hanging a bell from the neck of the leader of the flock.

Anonymous
7 years ago

deus ex machina    [DAY-uhs-eks-MAH-kuh-nuh; -nah; -MAK-uh-nuh]

noun:
1. In ancient Greek and Roman drama, a god introduced by means of a crane to unravel and resolve the plot.
2. Any active agent who appears unexpectedly to solve an apparently insoluble difficulty.

Deus ex machina is New Latin for "god from the machine"; it is a translation of the Greek theos ek mekhanes.

Anonymous
7 years ago

jollification    [jol-ih-fuh-KAY-shuhn]

noun:
Merrymaking; festivity; revelry.

Jollification is from jolly (from Old French joli, jolif, "joyful, merry") + Latin -ficare, combining form of facere, "to make."

Anonymous
7 years ago

xenophobia    [ZEN-uh-FOE-bee-uh]

noun:
Fear or hatred of strangers, people from other countries, or of anything that is strange or foreign.

The word xenophobia was formed from the Greek elements xenos "guest, stranger, foreigner" + phobos "fear."

Anonymous
7 years ago

obsequious   [ob-SEE-kwee-us]

adjective:
Servilely attentive; compliant to excess; fawning.

Obsequious comes from Latin obsequiosus, from obsequium, "compliance," from obsequi, "to comply with," from ob-, "toward" + sequi, "to follow."

Anonymous
7 years ago

excrescence    [ik-SKRESS-uhn(t)s]

noun:
1. Something (especially something abnormal) growing out from something else.
2. A disfiguring or unwanted mark, part, or addition.

Excrescence is from Latin excrescentia, "excrescences," from excrescere, "to grow out," from ex-, "out" + crescere, "to grow."

Anonymous
7 years ago

hullabaloo    [HUL-uh-buh-loo]

noun:
A confused noise; uproar; tumult.

Hullabaloo is perhaps a corruption of hurly-burly, or the interjection halloo with rhyming reduplication.

Anonymous
7 years ago

acrid    [AK-rid]

adjective:
1. Sharp and harsh, or bitter to the taste or smell; pungent.
2. Caustic in language or tone; bitter.

Acrid comes from Latin acer, "sharp."

Anonymous
7 years ago

misnomer    [mis-NO-muhr]

noun:
1. The misnaming of a person in a legal instrument, as in a complaint or indictment.
2. Any misnaming of a person or thing; also, a wrong or inapplicable name or designation.

Misnomer is from Medieval French mesnommer, "to misname," from mes-, "wrongly" + nommer, "to name," from Latin nominare, "to name," from nomen, "a name."

Anonymous
7 years ago

repine    [rih-PINE]

intransitive verb:
1. To feel or express discontent.
2. To long for something.

Repine is re- (from the Latin) + pine, from Old English pinian, "to torment," ultimately from Latin poena, "penalty, punishment."

Anonymous
7 years ago

plethora    [PLETH-uh-ruh]

noun:
1. An abnormal bodily condition characterized by an excessive amount of blood in the system.
2. Excess; superabundance.

Plethora comes from the Greek plethora, "a fullness," from plethein, "to be full."

Anonymous
7 years ago

anathema    [uh-NATH-uh-muh]

noun:
1. A ban or curse pronounced with religious solemnity by ecclesiastical authority, and accompanied by excommunication. Hence: Denunciation of anything as accursed.
2. An imprecation; a curse; a malediction.
3. Any person or thing anathematized, or cursed by ecclesiastical authority.
4. Any person or thing that is intensely disliked.

Anathema comes from the Greek word meaning "a thing devoted," especially a thing devoted to evil, hence "a curse," from anatithenai, "to dedicate, to set up," from ana, "up" + tithenai, "to place or put."

Anonymous
7 years ago

remunerate    [rih-MYOO-nuh-rate]

transitive verb:
1. To pay an equivalent to for any service, loss, or expense; to recompense.
2. To compensate for; to make payment for.

Remunerate comes from Latin remunerari, "to reward," from re-, "back, again" + munerari, "to give, to present," from munus, "a gift."

Anonymous
7 years ago

myriad    [MIR-ee-uhd]

adjective:
1. Consisting of a very great, but indefinite, number; as, myriad stars.
2. Composed of numerous diverse elements or aspects.

noun:
1. The number of ten thousand; ten thousand persons or things. (Chiefly in reference to the Greek numeral system, or in translations from Greek or Latin).
2. An immense number; a very great many; an indefinitely large number.

Myriad is from Greek myrias, myriad-, "ten thousand; a myriad," from myrios, "numberless; countless; ten thousand."

Anonymous
7 years ago

acerbic    [uh-SUR-bik]

adjective:
Sharp, biting, or acid in temper, expression, or tone.

Acerbic comes from Latin acerbus, "bitter, sour, severe, harsh."

Anonymous
7 years ago

nefarious    [nuh-FAIR-ee-uhs]

adjective:
Wicked in the extreme; iniquitous.

Nefarious is from Latin nefarius, from nefas, "that which is contrary to divine command; a crime, transgression, sin," from ne-, "not" + fas, "divine command or law."

Anonymous
7 years ago

sojourn    [SOH-juhrn; so-JURN]

intransitive verb:
1. To stay as a temporary resident; to dwell for a time.

noun:
1. A temporary stay.

Sojourn comes from Old French sojorner, from (assumed) Vulgar Latin subdiurnare, from Latin sub-, "under, a little over" + Late Latin diurnus, "lasting for a day," from Latin dies, "day."

Anonymous
7 years ago

bedizen    [bih-DY-zuhn]

transitive verb:
To dress or adorn in gaudy manner.

Bedizen is the prefix be-, "completely; thoroughly; excessively" + dizen, an archaic word meaning "to deck out in fine clothes and ornaments," from Middle Dutch disen, "to dress (a distaff) with flax ready for spinning," from Middle Low German dise, "the bunch of flax placed on a distaff."

Anonymous
7 years ago

inchoate    [in-KOH-it]

adjective:
1. In an initial or early stage; just begun.
2. Imperfectly formed or formulated.

Inchoate comes from the past participle of Latin inchoare, alteration of incohare, "to begin."

Anonymous
7 years ago

gewgaw    [G(Y)OO-gaw]

noun:
A showy trifle; a trinket; a bauble.

The origin of gewgaw is uncertain.

Anonymous
7 years ago

kismet    [KIZ-met; -mit]

noun:
Destiny; fate.

Kismet comes (via Turkish) from Arabic qismah, "portion, lot."

Anonymous
7 years ago

cabal    [kuh-BAHL; kuh-BAL]

noun:
1. A secret, conspiratorial association of plotters or intriguers whose purpose is usually to bring about an overturn especially in public affairs.
2. The schemes or plots of such an association.

intransitive verb:
1. To form a cabal; to conspire; to intrigue; to plot.

Cabal derives from Medieval Latin cabala, a transliteration of Hebrew qabbalah, "received," hence "traditional, lore," from qabal, "to receive." The evolution in sense is: "(secret) tradition, secret, secret plots or intrigues, secret meeting, secret meeters, a group of plotters or intriguers."

Anonymous
7 years ago

rara avis    [RAIR-uh-AY-vis]

noun;
plural rara avises RAIR-uh-AY-vuh-suhz or rarae aves RAIR-ee-AY-veez:
A rare or unique person or thing.

Rara avis is Latin for "rare bird."

Anonymous
7 years ago

busker    [BUS-kur]

noun:
A person who entertains (as by playing music) in public places.

Busker is from busk, "to seek to entertain by singing and dancing," probably from Spanish buscar, "to seek."

Anonymous
7 years ago

probity    [PRO-buh-tee]

noun:
Complete and confirmed integrity; uprightness.

Probity is from Latin probitas, from probus, "good, upright, virtuous."

Anonymous
7 years ago

recherche    [ruh-sher-SHAY]

adjective:
1. Uncommon; exotic; rare.
2. Exquisite; choice.
3. Excessively refined; affected.
4. Pretentious; overblown.

Recherche comes from French, from rechercher, "to seek out," from re- + chercher, "to look for, to seek."

Anonymous
7 years ago

garrulous    [GAIR-uh-lus; GAIR-yuh-]

adjective:
1. Talking much, especially about commonplace or trivial things; talkative.
2. Wordy.

Garrulous is from Latin garrulus, from garrire, "to chatter, to babble."

Anonymous
7 years ago

amanuensis    [uh-man-yoo-EN-sis]

noun:
A person employed to take dictation or to copy manuscripts.

Amanuensis comes from Latin, from the phrase (servus) a manu, "slave with handwriting duties," from a, ab, "by" + manu, from manus, "hand."

Anonymous
7 years ago

supererogatory    [soo-puhr-ih-ROG-uh-tor-ee]

adjective:
1. Going beyond what is required or expected.
2. Superfluous; unnecessary.

Supererogatory comes from Latin supererogare, "to spend over and above," from super, "over, above" + erogare, "to ask for," from e-, "out" + rogare, "to ask, to request."

Anonymous
7 years ago

fallible    [FAL-uh-bul]

adjective:
1. Liable to make a mistake.
2. Liable to be inaccurate or erroneous.

Fallible derives from Medieval Latin fallibilis, from Latin fallere, "to deceive." It is related to fail, false (from falsum, the past participle of fallere), fallacy ("a false notion"), fault (from Old French falte, from fallere), and faucet (from Old Provençal falsar, "to falsify, to create a fault in, to bore through," from fallere).

Anonymous
7 years ago

temerarious    [tem-uh-RAIR-ee-uhs]

adjective:
Recklessly or presumptuously daring; rash.

Temerarious comes from Latin temerarius, "rash," from temere, "rashly, heedlessly."

Anonymous
7 years ago

aplomb    [uh-PLOM]

noun:
Assurance of manner or of action; self-possession; confidence; coolness.

Aplomb is from the French word meaning "perpendicularity, equilibrium, steadiness, assurance," from the Old French phrase a plomb, from a, "according to" (from Latin ad) + plomb, "lead weight" (from Latin plumbum, "lead").

Anonymous
7 years ago

lissom    [LISS-uhm]

adjective;
also lissome:
1. Limber; supple; flexible.
2. Light and quick in action; nimble; agile; active.

Lissom is an alteration of lithesome, which derives from Old English lithe, "flexible, mild, gentle."

Anonymous
7 years ago

irrupt    [ih-RUHPT]

intransitive verb:
1. To burst in forcibly or suddenly; to intrude.
2. (Ecology) To increase rapidly in number.

Irrupt is derived from the past participle of Latin irrumpere, from ir-, in-, "in" + rumpere, "to break."

Anonymous
7 years ago

nettlesome    [NET-l-suhm]

adjective:
Causing irritation, vexation, or distress.

Nettlesome is from the verb nettle, "to sting; to irritate or vex" (from nettle, a plant covered with minute sharp, stinging hairs) + -some.

Anonymous
7 years ago

dissolute    [DIS-uh-loot]

adjective:
Loose in morals and conduct; marked by indulgence in sensual pleasures or vices.

Dissolute comes from the past participle of Latin dissolvere, "to loosen," from dis- + solvere, "to release."

Anonymous
7 years ago

relegate    [REL-uh-gayt]

transitive verb:
1. To assign to an inferior position, place, or condition.
2. To assign to an appropriate category or class.
3. To assign or refer (a matter or task, for example) to another for appropriate action.
4. To send into exile; to banish.

Relegate is from the past participle of Latin relegare, "to send away, to remove, to put aside, to reject," from re- + legare, "to send with a commission or charge."

Anonymous
7 years ago

factitious    [fak-TISH-uhs]

adjective:
1. Produced artificially, in distinction from what is produced by nature.
2. Artificial; not authentic or genuine; sham.

Factitious comes from Latin facticius, "made by art, artificial," from the past participle of facere, "to make."

Anonymous
7 years ago

abominate    [uh-BOM-uh-nayt]

transitive verb:
To hate in the highest degree; to detest intensely; to loathe; to abhor.

Abominate comes from Latin abominari, "to deprecate as a bad omen, to hate, to detest," from ab- + omen, "an omen."

Anonymous
7 years ago

sine qua non    [sin-ih-kwah-NON; -NOHN; sy-nih-kway-]

noun:
An essential condition or element; an indispensable thing.

Sine qua non is from the Late Latin, literally "without which not."

Anonymous
7 years ago

ennui    [on-WEE]

noun:
A feeling of weariness and dissatisfaction arising from lack of interest; boredom.

Ennui is from the French, from Old French enui, "annoyance," from enuier, "to annoy, to bore," from the Latin phrase in odium, "in hatred or dislike."

Anonymous
7 years ago

perdurable    [pur-DUR-uh-bul; pur-DYUR-]

adjective:
Very durable; lasting; continuing long.

Perdurable ultimately comes from Late Latin perdurabilis, from Latin perdurare, to last a long time, to endure, from per-, throughout + durare, to last.

Anonymous
7 years ago

copacetic    [koh-puh-SET-ik]

adjective:
Very satisfactory; fine.

The origin of copacetic is unknown.

Anonymous
7 years ago

ersatz [AIR-sahts; UR-sats]

adjective:
Being a substitute or imitation, usually an inferior one.

Ersatz derives from German Ersatz, "a substitute."

Anonymous
7 years ago

raiment    [RAY-ment]

noun:
Clothing in general; garments; -- usually singular in form, with a collective sense.

Raiment is from Middle English rayment, short for arrayment, from arrayen, "to array."

Anonymous
7 years ago

menagerie    [muh-NAJ-uh-ree; -NAZH-]

noun:
1. A collection of wild or unusual animals, especially for exhibition.
2. An enclosure where wild or unusual animals are kept or exhibited.
3. A diverse or varied group.

Menagerie comes from French ménagerie, from Middle French, from menage, from Old French mesnage, "dwelling."

Anonymous
7 years ago

aberrant    [a-BERR-unt; AB-ur-unt]

adjective:
Markedly different from an accepted norm; Deviating from the ordinary or natural type; abnormal.

That which is aberrant is literally that which "wanders away from" what is accepted, ordinary, normal, natural, etc., aberrant being from Latin aberro, aberrare, to wander off, to lose one's way, from ab, away from + erro, errare, to wander.

Anonymous
7 years ago

extempore    [ik-STEM-puh-ree]

adverb:
1. Without premeditation or preparation; on the spur of the moment.

adjective:
1. Done or performed extempore.

Extempore is from the Latin phrase ex tempore, "out of the time," therefore "immediately, at the very time the occasion arises."

Anonymous
7 years ago

lubricious    [loo-BRISH-us]

adjective:
1. Lustful; lewd.
2. Stimulating or appealing to sexual desire or imagination.
3. Having a slippery or smooth quality.

Lubricious derives from Latin lubricus, "slippery, smooth."

Anonymous
7 years ago

ineffectual    [in-ih-FEK-choo-uhl]

adjective:
Not producing the proper effect; without effect; weak; useless; futile; unavailing.

Ineffectual ultimately comes from Latin in-, negative prefix + effectus, "effect, result," from efficere, "to produce, to effect," from ex, "out of" + facere, "to make."

Anonymous
7 years ago

magniloquent    [mag-NIL-uh-kwent]

adjective:
Lofty or grandiose in speech or expression; using a high-flown style of discourse; bombastic.

Magniloquent is derived from Latin magniloquentia, from magnus, "great" + the present participle of loqui, "to speak."

Anonymous
7 years ago

perquisite    [PUR-kwuh-zit]

noun:
1. A profit or benefit in addition to a salary or wages.
2. Broadly: The benefits of a position or office.
3. A gratuity or tip for services performed.
4. Anything to which someone has or claims the sole right.

Perquisite derives from Medieval Latin perquisitum, from the past participle of Latin perquirere, "to search for eagerly," from per-, "through, thoroughly" + quaerere, "to seek." In Middle English it meant "property acquired by means other than inheritance." By 1565 it had acquired the sense "fringe benefit"; by 1721 it had also come to signify "a tip or gratuity."

Anonymous
7 years ago

subterfuge    [SUB-tur-fyooj]

noun:
A deceptive device or stratagem.

Subterfuge comes from Late Latin subterfugium, "a secret flight," from Latin subterfugere, "to flee in secret, to evade," from subter, "underneath, underhand, in secret" + fugere, "to flee." It is related to fugitive, one who flees.

Anonymous
7 years ago

mien    [MEEN]

noun:
1. Manner or bearing, especially as expressive of mood, attitude, or personality; demeanor.
2. Aspect; appearance.

Mien perhaps derives from French mine, "bearing, expression," from Breton min, "beak, snout," hence "a person's face."

Anonymous
7 years ago

irascible    [ih-RASS-uh-buhl]

adjective:
Prone to anger; easily provoked to anger; hot-tempered.

Irascible is from Latin irascibilis, "prone to anger," from ira, "anger," which is also the source of ire and irate.

Anonymous
7 years ago

canorous    [kuh-NOR-us; KAN-or-uhs]

adjective:
Richly melodious; pleasant sounding; musical.

Canorous comes from the Latin canor, "melody," from canere, "to sing." It is related to chant, from French chanter, "to sing," ultimately from Latin canere.

Anonymous
7 years ago

sylvan    [SIL-vuhn]

adjective:
1. Of or pertaining to woods or forest regions.
2. Living or located in a wood or forest.
3. Abounding in forests or trees; wooded.

noun:
1. A fabled deity or spirit of the woods.
2. One that lives in or frequents the woods or forest; a rustic.

Sylvan derives from Latin silva, sylva, "a wood or grove."

Anonymous
7 years ago

neophyte    [NEE-uh-fyt]

noun:
1. A new convert or proselyte.
2. A novice; a beginner in anything.

Neophyte comes from Late Latin neophytus, from Greek neophutos, "newly planted," from neo-, "new" + phutos, "planted," from phuein, "to grow, to bring forth."

Anonymous
7 years ago

indelible    [in-DEL-uh-buhl]

adjective:
1. That cannot be removed, erased, or washed away.
2. Making marks that cannot easily be removed or erased.
3. Incapable of being forgotten; memorable.

Indelible is from Latin indelebilis, from in-, "not" + delebilis, "that can be obliterated or destroyed," from delere, "to blot out, to efface, to destroy."

Anonymous
7 years ago

caterwaul    [KAT-uhr-wawl]

intransitive verb:
1. To make a harsh cry.
2. To have a noisy argument.

noun:
1. A shrill, discordant sound.

Caterwaul is from Middle English caterwawen, "to cry as a cat," either from Medieval Dutch kater, "tomcat" + Dutch wauwelen, "to tattle," or for catawail, from cat-wail, "to wail like a cat."

Anonymous
7 years ago

disheveled    [dih-SHEV-uhld]

adjective;
also dishevelled:
In loose disorder; disarranged; unkempt; as, "disheveled hair."

Disheveled is from Old French descheveler, "to disarrange the hair," from des-, "apart" (from Latin dis-) + chevel, "hair," from Latin capillus.

Anonymous
7 years ago

nolens volens    [NO-lenz-VO-lenz]


Whether unwilling or willing.

Nolens volens is from the Latin, from nolle, "to be unwilling" + velle, "to wish, to be willing."

Anonymous
7 years ago

effusive    [ih-FYOO-siv]

adjective:
Excessively demonstrative; giving or involving extravagant or excessive emotional expression; gushing.

Effusive, at root meaning "pouring out," comes from Latin effusus, past participle of effundere, "to pour out," from ex-, "out" + fundere, "to pour."

Anonymous
7 years ago

permeate    [PUR-mee-ayt]

transitive verb:
1. To spread or diffuse through.
2. To pass through the pores or openings of.

intransitive verb:
1. To spread through or penetrate something.

Permeate is from Latin permeare, "to go through, to pass through," from per-, "through" + meare, "to go, to pass."

Anonymous
7 years ago

callow    [KAL-oh]

adjective:
Immature; lacking adult perception, experience, or judgment.

Callow is from Old English calu, "featherless, bald."

Anonymous
7 years ago

adventitious    [ad-ven-TISH-uhs]

adjective:
1. Added extrinsically; not essentially inherent.
2. (Biology) Out of the proper or usual place; as, "adventitious buds or roots."

Adventitious comes from Latin adventicius, "coming from without, from outside sources," from the past participle of advenire, "to come towards or to; (of events) to happen," from ad- "to" + venire, "to come."

Anonymous
7 years ago

quietus    [kwy-EE-tuhs]

noun:
1. Final discharge or acquittance, as from debt or obligation.
2. Removal from activity; rest; death.
3. Something that serves to suppress or quiet.

Quietus is from Medieval Latin quietus (est), "(it is) at rest" (said of an obligation that has been discharged), from Latin quietus, "at rest."

Anonymous
7 years ago

stoic    [STOH-ik]

noun:
1. (Capitalized). A member of a school of philosophy founded by Zeno holding that one should be free from passion, unmoved by joy or grief, and should submit without complaint to unavoidable necessity.
2. Hence, one who is apparently or professedly indifferent to or unaffected by pleasure or pain, joy or grief.

adjective:
1. Of or pertaining to the Stoics; resembling the Stoics or their doctrines.
2. Not affected by passion; being or appearing indifferent to pleasure or pain, joy or grief
.

Stoic comes from Greek stoikos, literally "of or pertaining to a colonnade or porch," from stoa, "a roofed colonnade, a porch, especially, a porch in Athens where Zeno and his successors taught."

Anonymous
7 years ago

upbraid    [uhp-BRAYD]

transitive verb:
To scold or criticize harshly.

Upbraid is from Middle English upbreiden, from Old English upbregdan, "to twist up, hence to reproach," from up-, "up" + bregdan, "to move back and forth; to weave."

Anonymous
7 years ago

nonagenarian    [non-uh-juh-NAIR-ee-uhn; no-nuh-]

noun:
A ninety year old person; someone whose age is in the nineties.

Nonagenarian derives from Latin nonagenarius, "containing or consisting of ninety," from nonageni-, "ninety each", ultimately from novem, "nine," as in November, originally the ninth month of the old Roman calendar.

Anonymous
7 years ago

inculcate    [in-KUHL-kayt; IN-kuhl-kayt]

transitive verb:
To teach and impress by frequent repetition or instruction.

Inculcate is from Latin inculcare, "to tread upon, to force upon," from in-, "in, on" + calcare, "to trample," from calx, calc-, "heel."

Anonymous
7 years ago

primogeniture    [pry-moh-JEN-ih-choor]

noun:
1. The state of being the firstborn of the same parents; seniority by birth among children of the same family.
2. (Law) An exclusive right of inheritance that belongs to the eldest son.

Primogeniture is from Late Latin primogenitura, from Latin primus, "first" + genitura, "a begetting, birth, generation," from the past participle of gignere, "to beget."

Anonymous
7 years ago

supplicate    [SUP-luh-kayt]

intransitive verb:
1. To make a humble and earnest petition; to pray humbly.

transitive verb:
1. To seek or ask for humbly and earnestly.
2. To make a humble petition to; to beseech.

Supplicate derives from the past participle of Latin supplicare, from supplex, "entreating for mercy." The noun form is supplication.

Anonymous
7 years ago

raillery    [RAY-luh-ree]

noun:
1. Good-humored banter or teasing.
2. An instance of good-humored teasing; a jest.

Raillery is from French raillerie, from Old French railler, "to tease, to mock."

Anonymous
7 years ago

imprimatur    [im-prih-MAH-tur; -MAY-]

noun:
1. Official license or approval to print or publish a book, paper, etc.; especially, such a license issued by the Roman Catholic episcopal authority.
2. Approval; sanction.
3. A mark of approval or distinction.

Imprimatur is from New Latin imprimatur, "let it be printed," from imprimere, "to imprint," from Latin, from in- + premere, "to press."

Anonymous
7 years ago

remonstrate    [rih-MAHN-strayt; REH-mun-strayt]

intransitive verb:
1. To present and urge reasons in opposition to an act, measure, or any course of proceedings -- usually used with 'with'.

transitive verb:
1. To say or plead in protest, opposition, or reproof.

Remonstrate comes from Medieval Latin remonstrare, "to show again, to point back to, as a fault," from re- + monstrare, "to show."

Anonymous
7 years ago

pertinacious    [puhr-tin-AY-shuhs]

adjective:
1. Holding or adhering obstinately to any opinion, purpose, or design.
2. Stubbornly or perversely persistent.

Pertinacious is from Latin pertinax, "having a firm hold, obstinate," from per-, "thoroughly" + tenax, "holding fast, tenacious," from tenere, "to hold."

Anonymous
7 years ago

mimetic    [mim-ET-ik]

adjective:
1. Apt to imitate; given to mimicry; imitative.
2. Characterized by mimicry; -- applied to animals and plants; as, "mimetic species; mimetic organisms."

Mimetic comes from Greek mimetikos, from mimesis, "imitation," from mimos, a kind of drama; also, "an imitator, a copyist, an actor." Related words include mimic and mime.

Anonymous
7 years ago

scrabble    [SKRAB-uhl]

intransitive verb:
1. To scrape or scratch with the hands or feet.
2. To struggle by or as if by scraping or scratching.
3. To proceed by clawing with the hands and feet; to scramble.
4. To make irregular, crooked, or unmeaning marks; to scribble; to scrawl.

transitive verb:
1. To mark with irregular lines or letters; to scribble on or over.
2. To make or obtain by scraping together hastily.

noun:
1. The act or an instance of scrabbling.
2. A scribble.

Scrabble derives from Dutch schrabbelen, from Middle Dutch, frequentative of schrabben, "to scrape; to scratch."

Anonymous
7 years ago

friable    [FRY-uh-buhl]

adjective:
Easily crumbled, pulverized, or reduced to powder.

Friable comes from Latin friabilis, from friare, "to rub, break, or crumble into small pieces."

Anonymous
7 years ago

lacuna    [luh-KYOO-nuh]

noun;
plural lacunae luh-KYOO-nee or lacunas::
1. A blank space; a missing part; a gap.
2. (Biology) A small opening, depression, or cavity in an anatomical structure.

Lacuna is from the Latin lacuna, "a cavity, a hollow," from lacus, "a hollow."

Anonymous
7 years ago

obdurate    [OB-duh-rit; -dyuh-]

adjective:
1. Hardened in wrongdoing; stubbornly wicked. Hardened in feelings; hard-hearted.
2. Resistant to persuasion; unyielding.
3. Hard; harsh; rugged; rough.

Obdurate derives from the past participle of Latin obdurare, "to be hard against," from ob-, "against" + durus, "hard."

Anonymous
7 years ago

arcanum    [ar-KAY-nuhm]

noun;
plural arcana -nuh:
1. A secret; a mystery.
2. Specialized or mysterious knowledge, language, or information that is not accessible to the average person (generally used in the plural).

Arcanum is from the Latin, from arcanus "closed, secret," from arca, "chest, box," from arcere, "to shut in."

Anonymous
7 years ago

faineant    [fay-nay-AWN]

adjective:
1. Doing nothing or given to doing nothing; idle; lazy.

noun:
1. A do-nothing; an idle fellow; a sluggard.

Faineant is from French, from Middle French fait, "does" + néant, "nothing."

Anonymous
2008 Word of the Day
7 years ago
| Hot!

Since it's a new year, I thought I'd start a new thread.

 

Zeitgeist    [TSYT-guyst; ZYT-guyst]

noun:
[Often capitalized] The spirit of the time; the general intellectual and moral state or temper characteristic of any period of time.

Zeitgeist is from the German: Zeit, "time" + Geist, "spirit."