START A PETITION 25,136,189 members: the world's largest community for good
START A PETITION
x
 
 
This thread is displayed with the most recent posts first.
Yom Kippur October 09, 2008 9:32 AM

Today beginning at Sunset is Yom Kippur Known in English as the Day of Atonement it is the most solemn and important of the Jewish holidays. Its central themes are atonement and repentance. Jews traditionally observe this holy day with a 25-hour period of fasting and intensive prayer, often spending most of the day in synagogue services. Yom Kippur is the tenth and final day of the Ten Days of Repentance which begin with Rosh Hashanah. According to Jewish tradition, God inscribes each person's fate for the coming year into a "book" on Rosh Hashanah and waits until Yom Kippur to "seal" the verdict. During the Ten Days of Repentance, a Jew tries to amend his behavior and seek forgiveness for wrongs done against God and against his fellow man . The evening and day of Yom Kippur are set aside for public and private petitions and confessions of guilt (Vidui). At the end of Yom Kippur, one considers himself absolved by God. The Yom Kippur prayer service includes several unique aspects. One is the actual number of prayer services. Unlike a regular day, which has three prayer services (Ma'ariv, the evening prayer; Shacharit, the morning prayer; and Mincha, the afternoon prayer), or a Shabbat or Yom Tov, which have four prayer services (Ma'ariv; Shacharit; Musaf, the additional prayer; and Mincha), Yom Kippur has five prayer services (Ma'ariv; Shacharit; Musaf; Mincha; and Ne'ilah, the closing prayer). The prayer services also include a public confession of sins (Vidui) and a reenactment of the special Yom Kippur avodah (service) of the Kohen Gadol in the Holy Temple in Jerusalem.

 [ send green star]
 
 September 20, 2005 5:36 PM


ANIONE_11.GIF  [ send green star]
 
September is National Native American Wellbriety Month. August 15, 2005 1:19 AM

White Bison, Inc., An American Indian non-profit organization, announces
National Native American Wellbriety/Recovery Month, September, 2005
This year’s theme: Healing Lives, Families & Communities

September is National Native American Wellbriety Month. This fifth-annual Native American celebration of sobriety and recovery from alcohol and other drug addictions is held once again in conjunction with the nation-wide SAMHSA event, National Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Month.

Join the Voices for Recovery! In September, American Indians and Alaska Natives who are proudly recovering from substance abuse and chemical addictions will once again come forward to put a new face on recovery. Gatherings in Reservation and Native American communities across America will send the message that it’s good to be in recovery. It’s good to let the youth see how many adults and Elders are getting sober and working on wellness. It’s good for Native community and Tribal leadership to stand up for sobriety and recovery amongst themselves and for their constituents. It’s good to have sober leadership come forward in support of well living.

September will be a time to host gatherings in support of wellness and Wellbriety––sobriety and wellness combined. Over the past five years, American Indian and Alaska Native communities have held powwows, feasts, learning gatherings, walks, runs, and other kinds of events to stand up for wellness in their communities. Elders and other speakers have talked to the community about what it means to live in a good way, free of alcohol and other drugs. The youth have come forward to share what they are doing, and community sobriety drums provide ceremony for the many events. Sometimes wellness videos are shown. Sometimes nutritious traditional healing foods are available. It can be as simple as having friends over for dinner, holding a barbecue or a feed, or having an open house. Every community and tribal culture does it differently. Every celebration is unique and wonderful, carried out in the community’s own way.

This year, White Bison, Inc. and SAMHSA (the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration) are sponsoring events in three cities. Here are the coordinators and their contacts.

Cheyenne, Wyoming    Connie Robinson    303-332-5459 • meadowlark02@onewest.net
Mayetta, Kansas    Gayl Edmunds    816-561-3600
Omaha, Nebraska    John Penn    402-846-5280
• johnpenn33@yahoo.com

Visit the White Bison website www.whitebison.org to download the Recovery Month Letter, including a Proclamation form to take to Native leadership in support of Wellbriety/Recovery month. • Visit the White Bison website to get tips for your own community-sponsored events. • Visit the SAMHSA website www.recoverymonth.gov for the latest on the National Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Month. • Call White Bison at 1-877-871-1495 for more information about how communities everywhere can participate in Wellbriety/Recovery Month, September, 2005.

 [ send green star]
 
Announcements June 10, 2005 6:18 PM

Silverwolf and I created The Teachings of Baha'u'allah group not to try to get anyone to become a Bahai but only to discuss the teachings of the Bahai Faith, it's history, customs and beliefs.. We believe that religious matters are a personal choice that each individual must decide on.. The Religious Trail of life They will or will not choose to walk is each persons right of choice..We are not missionaries,the Bahai Faith does not have ministers or priests or missionaries,  nor are we trying to convert anyone we are just providing information about the Bahai Faith.. Whether you choose to become a Bahai or not is your business not ours.. 
 
I have been a Bahai for many years and I am the eldest son of a Baptist minister.. Silverwolf and I  are not concerned with what religion you follow or even if you do not adhere to a religion because that is your individual choice and who are we to try to influence you?  
 [ send green star]
 
  New Topic              Back To Topics Read Code of Conduct

 

This group:
The Teachings of Baha'u'allah
130 Members

View All Topics
New Topic

Track Topic
Mail Preferences