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Closed-flea control methods
8 years ago

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Flea Control With Boric Acid

You see your kitties and fido scratching feverishly and you see those little pesky fleas jumping onto the furniture, carpets and floor. Your first reaction is most likely to reach for the bottle of flea spray that you have purchased. But wait! Do you want to spray toxic pesticides all round your house. You don’t have to do that. You have a better and safer choice and that is:  flea control with boric acid.

Boric acid for fleas - how effective is it?

Boric acid is one of the oldest, low-toxicity inorganic minerals. It’s inexpensive but it posses insecticidal, fungicidal, and herbicidal properties and it is the “secret ingredient” in many of the commercial products used for insects control.

 

Boric acid is generally known as a desiccant. It acts as a flea killer by removing moisture from the insects’ body causing severe dehydration and eventually death. It’s highly effective in extremely small amount and it’s able to maintain its potency for a long period of time. It’s odorless and unlike others insecticides, it is non-repellant to insects. This means that insects will still return to the treated areas repeatedly until they are killed.

Fleas and its developing larvae and cocoons tend to gather and multiple in dark places away from light such as in carpets, in cracks and crevices on floors and walls and in the wells of furniture. Hence the obvious places to start flea control with boric acid will be these areas.

Here is how you can make use of boric acid effectively in your in-house treatment for fleas.

1. Firstly, clear all areas that require treatment.
Remove all things around the areas to be treated such as shoes, toys from the carpeted areas.

2. Begin your “boric acid carpet treatment for fleas” by first vacuuming all the carpeted surfaces thoroughly to remove dirt and dust. This will enable the boric acid powder to act more effectively. All cushions should also be removed from furniture. Clean and vacuum the walls as well.

3. Sprinkle the boric acid powder lightly over all carpeted areas including closet floors and under furniture. Pay special attention to favorite resting places of your pets, as these are likely to be areas where fleas are abundant.

4. Using a push broom, slowly brush the boric acid powder into the carpets. Brush in one direction to evenly spread out or distribute the powder. Then using a slow back and forth motion to work powder deeper into the carpets until no visible powder remains on the surface.

5. To make use of boric acid powder to kill fleas on furniture, simply sprinkle the boric acid powder very lightly over the furniture especially the wells. Using a hand brush, work the powder deep into the wells until powder disappears. Vacuum off all excess powder from the furniture.

Boric acid kills fleas larvae, but is not as effective at killing the adults, so you may not see the results for 2-6 weeks while the adult population dies off. As such, it is helpful to vacuum frequently to kill the adult fleas during the initial weeks after application.

Normal vacuuming can resumed 24-38 hours following application. All vacuum bags are to be removed and discarded immediately after vacuuming. The boric acid remains active for a long period of time even up to a year. However reapplication is necessary following cleaning of the treated carpets or rugs. 

Beside the mild eye, skin and throat irritation that may be caused by the use of boric acid, it is considered a relatively safe chemical for flea control in homes. With careful application, boric acid offers a safe and effective alternative without the indoor air problems associated with sprays. In fact, with proper care and adhering to label directions and precautions, the exposure to any associated risk is minimal.

There are many commercial products avail

8 years ago

Donna It is wonderful and important informatin. with Good clear explanation.

I understood why I did not see flees, they come and go, the garden where the shelter are sunny and ventilated.

Thanks

8 years ago

Abo, usually you will see flea eggs and dirt. It looks like salt and pepper on a shelf or other area. If the fleas are on a blanket, you can see the flea larvae as they wiggle. I always kept blankets in the back room for the utility room cats to sleep on. I put some up on the washer and dryer, and on the floor too, and when summer comes, and fleas, I wash them, and put them away, and just use small blankets or towels that are easy to keep on popping into the washer.

A flea comb is so important for finding them. I also found that outside cats do not have as many as the indoor cats do. Fat cats have more than skinny ones usually. The fat cats don't move around that much.

8 years ago

Donna, i've never seen a flea comb but i'm interested in getting one, if i can get out today i'll check out the pet store.Last year we did'nt have many fleas as our summer(well we did'nt get one) rained the whole time, but it'd be good to have one on stand by.It's 5.22am here did'nt sleep with those tablets again, last day of them thank goodness, it's pouring down of rain and quite windy here just now, if it keeps like this i'll stay in.

8 years ago

Linda,

The flea comb also takes out the kitty's loose fur too. It is not just for fleas, but for general grooming. There are some that are nicer than others. The all silver one is my favorite.

8 years ago

Will look at the combs in pet store tomorrow, just read the info on fles and the boric acid, really interesting, i remember years ago my mum used boric acid can't remember exactly what for but i know it has many uses.

8 years ago

cat flea comb has 22 teeth. I never used the boric acid either.

Night night ! I hope I can sleep since I slept my brains away. The scrolling thing on my mouse is giving me a hard time.

Flea Control
8 years ago

One thing that fleas hate more than anything in the world...the smell of lemon.

Last year I had a horrible time with fleas on my kittens. They were too young for flea spray...and I did tons of research on natural remedies that weren't harmful to the kittens.

Basically anything that has a lemon scent (dish soap or plain lemon juice & water) will get rid of the fleas. Instead of buying flea bath for my cats, I just bathe them with lemon dish soap.

8 years ago

Thank you Donna and Rachel for those tips...I am against pesticides for us and our cats. So far luckily we have not had a problem with fleas but you never know. Both of my kitties love the outside

8 years ago

Thank you for the tips Rachel. I am against powders and sprays, but I did have a kitten problem years ago, and I used blue dawn dish detergent. It was safe for the fleas. I lathered them up, and tried to keep it on them at least 5 minutes, and then rinsed. The flease were gone, but remember, there are eggs around the house, and where they sleep needs changing all the time, and we must vaccuum all the time to get those flea eggs up. Killing the fleas is only part one of the job.

Also, a bowl of water with a light over it helps, and even without one. I had several bowls of water in the spare room where it always seems to be trouble, and I found loads of dead fleas in the water in the morning. Light attracts those flease though. I used a reading lamp one time.

8 years ago

I'll have to try the light w/ water idea...Thanks!

Anonymous
Flea control methods.
4 years ago

Frontline works for our cats.

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