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[{[fishiertferd}}} WATCH RIDDICK ONLINE PUTLOCKER MOVIE FREE
1 year ago

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Riddick, a movie that might have been titled “A Diesel and His Digital Dingo Dog,” is built to mirror the signature traits of its star. Like Vin Diesel, it has bulk, lumbering clumsily along as it repeats the actor’s greatest hits — the ones that don’t require him to drive a fast and furious car. The third movie in his career-making trilogy that began with Pitch Black (2000) roughly — very roughly — picks up where The Chronicles of Riddick (2004) left off. The convict Riddick has been dumped and left for dead on a planet covered with desert and just enough water holes to survive. It’s all just a tad familiar. Riddick narrates his saga, describing his new life on a place where “the whole damned planet wanted a piece of me.” Beastly birds and eels live there, too, and scorpionlike monsters come out when it rains. Familiar. Except for the dogs — deep-space dingoes or hyenas — one of whom he befriends and trains to be his pal. Then he stumbles across a “mercenary post,” where he sends out a distress call — luring two competing teams of bounty hunters, which he can then pick off, one by one. Jordi Molla and Matt Nable are the feuding mercenary bosses who long to collect the price on Riddick’s head. They aren’t hearing Riddick’s narration. He tries to warn them. “It’s always the punch you don’t see coming that puts you down.” Diesel is wholly engaged in the project, unlike the last few Furious pictures, in which sleepwalking was allowed. He grimaces through Riddick’s self-surgery, scowls as he fights various digital beasts and turns all David Caruso with Riddick’s omnipresent sunglasses. The supporting players are mainly here to be sadists; the fetchingly brawny Katee Sackhoff, as a lesbian mercenary aptly named Dahl, stands out in that crew. But the slow, unexciting thriller lacks the edge-of-the-seat suspense of Pitch Black. The story arc — convict redeems himself by killing monsters and saving people — is the same but lacks snap. And, idiotically, Diesel and his collaborator in all things Riddick — writer-director David Twohy — expect us to remember details from the first two films (which weren’t blockbusters) from a decade ago.Somewhere along the way I lost a step," says Vin Diesel, aka that gravelly voiced, visually impaired, planet-hopping outlaw and badass they call Riddick. "I went and got sloppy." He's talking about how he ended up on a desolate planet facing murderous canine creatures and giant deadly serpents. But he could just as easily be talking about the lethally inadequate screenplay he's up against. "Sloppy" is a kind word, actually, for the ridiculously clumsy dialogue in Riddick, the third and latest installment of the sci-fi saga. Of course, none of this will likely matter to the hard-core fans who've been waiting for this movie since the 2004 Chronicles of Riddick, a successor to the 2000 Pitch Black. Even though that megabudget film tanked at the box office, it fed the franchise's avid cult following, as have a pair of video games. And fans will no doubt be especially happy that in Riddick — its title now streamlined, along with its budget — no compromises have been made for a wimpy PG-13 rating. No, it's an R this time, which allows for a few characters to meet a particularly gory end (don't run out for popcorn during the second half!), not to mention free-wheeling profanity and one gratuitous nude scene. Not all is bleak. The bald and beefy Diesel, whose sturdy commercial appeal is proven again and again with the huge success of the Fast & Furious franchise, is always fun to watch. But his presence alone, comfortably durable as it is, can't make up for the total lack of other interesting characters in the screenplay by David Twohy, who also directs. Alas, that includes Katee Sackhoff as the lone female, a feisty bounty hunter named Dahl. The name sounds exactly like Doll, which is basically her role; she's pretty but has no interesting backstory or dialogue, save one profane comeback sure to draw hearty cheers. If you didn't see The Chronicles of Riddick — or if you saw it and didn't quite follow the overwrought plot — you'll be OK here, because only brief references are made to Riddick's checkered past. A quick flashback reminds us that when we last saw him, he'd been crowned the Lord Marshal of those dark Necromongers. But hey, the grass is always greener in outer space, and what Riddick really wants is to return to his home world, Furya. So he makes a deal with his enemy, Vaako (Karl Urban, appearing here for a few seconds). But that's where he's gotten sloppy. He's duped — dropped onto a desolate, dangerous place called, well, Not Furya. He's badly wounded, too. And then there are those vicious dogs, and those scary serpent creatures. But this is Riddick, and somehow, he makes his way to an abandoned mercenary post and sends out an emergency signal. His plan is to escape on the ship of the bounty hunters sure to arrive any minute. And arrive they do — two competing bands of them. One is led by the almost comically inept Santana (Jordi Molla), who's intent on beheading Riddick, and has brought a box along for that purpose. The bounty, you see, is doubled if Riddick is brought back dead. But Boss Johns (a square-jawed Matt Nable) has other ideas. He's the head of the other band, and he has some important q

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