START A PETITION 27,000,000 members: the world's largest community for good
START A PETITION
x
 
 
This thread is displayed with the most recent posts first.
 July 14, 2010 9:37 PM

UN CALLS FOR URGENT ACTION TO TACKLE RISING YOUTH UNEMPLOYMENT

New York, Jul 14 2010 12:10PM
The United Nations labour agency is calling for urgent action to tackle the crisis of youth unemployment, which has increased significantly in the wake of the global economic slowdown and has repercussions for the economy as well as social cohesion.

Young people – those aged 15 to 24 – account for over 22 per cent of the increase in the number of unemployed since the beginning of 2007 and is now nearly three times the average level among adults aged 25 and over, according to the International Labour Organization (<"http://www.ilo.org/global/About_the_ILO/Media_and_public_information/Feature_stories/lang--en/WCMS_142805/index.htm">ILO).

“In nearly all countries, the increase in youth unemployment has outpaced that of adults,” the agency says in a new <"http://www.ilo.org/public/english/bureau/inst/download/dp201.pdf">report entitled “Youth employment in crisis.”

Since the start of the crisis, the youth unemployment rate has risen over 7 percentage points – the sharpest two year increase on record – and now exceeds 21 per cent on average in the countries for which data are available, say Steven Tobin, ILO economist, and Raymond Torres, Director of the International Institute for Labour Studies, who are co-authors of the report.

The report points out that young people are entering the labour market at a time of limited job creation. Employed young people are also often engaged in precarious jobs, and are therefore more vulnerable to job losses than their adult counterparts.

Young people who lack general or vocational education are especially vulnerable to the crisis, it notes, adding that as job prospects remain weak, many young people might see little benefit of furthering education or training which would have negative socio-economic consequences.

In addition, the lack of decent work opportunities in developing countries had led to significant emigration by many skilled young people.

The authors stress that it is crucial to promote more and better jobs for youth and urges immediate action, noting that impact of long-term unemployment on youth can be “devastating and long-lasting.”

The longer young persons remain out of touch with the labour market, the more difficult – and costly – it is to return to productive employment, they state.

“There are also a number of important social implications related to exclusion, including susceptibility to anti-social behaviour, including juvenile delinquency, and social unrest,” they add.

According to the report, it will not be possible to improve youth employment prospects significantly in the absence of a global economic and labour market recovery. Therefore, it is crucial to carry out the Global Jobs Pact, adopted by ILO members in June 2009 in an effort to guide national and international policies to stimulate economic recovery, create jobs and protect working people and their families.

Jul 14 2010 12:10PM
________________
For more details go to UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news
 [ send green star]
 
 July 14, 2010 9:37 PM

UN CALLS FOR URGENT ACTION TO TACKLE RISING YOUTH UNEMPLOYMENT

New York, Jul 14 2010 12:10PM
The United Nations labour agency is calling for urgent action to tackle the crisis of youth unemployment, which has increased significantly in the wake of the global economic slowdown and has repercussions for the economy as well as social cohesion.

Young people – those aged 15 to 24 – account for over 22 per cent of the increase in the number of unemployed since the beginning of 2007 and is now nearly three times the average level among adults aged 25 and over, according to the International Labour Organization (<"http://www.ilo.org/global/About_the_ILO/Media_and_public_information/Feature_stories/lang--en/WCMS_142805/index.htm">ILO).

“In nearly all countries, the increase in youth unemployment has outpaced that of adults,” the agency says in a new <"http://www.ilo.org/public/english/bureau/inst/download/dp201.pdf">report entitled “Youth employment in crisis.”

Since the start of the crisis, the youth unemployment rate has risen over 7 percentage points – the sharpest two year increase on record – and now exceeds 21 per cent on average in the countries for which data are available, say Steven Tobin, ILO economist, and Raymond Torres, Director of the International Institute for Labour Studies, who are co-authors of the report.

The report points out that young people are entering the labour market at a time of limited job creation. Employed young people are also often engaged in precarious jobs, and are therefore more vulnerable to job losses than their adult counterparts.

Young people who lack general or vocational education are especially vulnerable to the crisis, it notes, adding that as job prospects remain weak, many young people might see little benefit of furthering education or training which would have negative socio-economic consequences.

In addition, the lack of decent work opportunities in developing countries had led to significant emigration by many skilled young people.

The authors stress that it is crucial to promote more and better jobs for youth and urges immediate action, noting that impact of long-term unemployment on youth can be “devastating and long-lasting.”

The longer young persons remain out of touch with the labour market, the more difficult – and costly – it is to return to productive employment, they state.

“There are also a number of important social implications related to exclusion, including susceptibility to anti-social behaviour, including juvenile delinquency, and social unrest,” they add.

According to the report, it will not be possible to improve youth employment prospects significantly in the absence of a global economic and labour market recovery. Therefore, it is crucial to carry out the Global Jobs Pact, adopted by ILO members in June 2009 in an effort to guide national and international policies to stimulate economic recovery, create jobs and protect working people and their families.

Jul 14 2010 12:10PM
________________
For more details go to UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news
 [ send green star]
 
 April 25, 2009 7:22 PM

UNESCO AND ITS PARTNERS LAUNCH ONLINE LIBRARY TO CELEBRATE WORLD CULTURES

New York, Apr 21 2009 2:10PM
In a bid to celebrate the world’s myriad cultures, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and dozens of partner institutions today launched the World Digital Library, a Web site featuring cultural materials from libraries and archives worldwide, free of charge.

The new Library, known as WDL, will function in seven languages – Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish – and includes content in over 40 languages.

James H. Billington, the United States Librarian of Congress, first proposed the creation of the online library to <"http://portal.unesco.org/en/ev.php-URL_ID=29008&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html">UNESCO in 2005, stressing that such a project could have the “salutary effect of bringing people together by celebrating the depth and uniqueness of different cultures in a single global undertaking.”

At today’s launch at UNESCO headquarters in Paris, the agency’s Director-General Koïchiro Matsuura hailed the WDL, noting that it “offers and invaluable platform for the free flow of information, for international solidarity, for the celebration of cultural diversity and for the building of inclusive knowledge societies.”

Developed by a team from the Library of Congress, the project seeks to expand the volume and variety of cultural content on the Internet; provide resources for educators, scholars and general audiences; and close the digital divide both within and between countries.

Among the information available on the WLD are manuscripts, books, maps and rubbings of oracle bones spanning the range of Chinese history, from ancient to modern times, contributed by the National Library of China.

Also on the site are Arabic scientific manuscripts from the National Library and Archives of Egypt and early photographs of Latin America courtesy of the National Library of Brazil.

 [ send green star]
 
 April 25, 2009 7:02 PM

EVEN FEWER WILL ATTEND SCHOOL DUE TO FALLING BASIC EDUCATION AID – UNESCO

New York, Apr 23 2009 1:10PM
Steep drops in aid to basic education in developing countries threatens to roll back progress made towards achieving the global goal of universal primary schooling, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (<"http://portal.unesco.org/en/ev.php-URL_ID=45166&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html">UNESCO) cautioned today.

Total aid commitments to basic education has dropped over 20 per cent from $5.5 billion in 2006 to $4.3 billion in 2007, according to the latest figures from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

At present, there are 75 million children out of school, with many millions more dropping out before completing primary education, the 2009 report of the UNESCO’s Education for All Global Monitoring Report Team said.

It also predicted that the goal of achieving universal primary education by 2015 will be missed by at least 30 million children.

Commitments made by donor nations have not been sustained, with only 5 per cent of all education aid going towards basic education in 2007.

Only the United States’ aid to basic education rose significantly in 2007, but too few countries stepped in to fill the financing gap.

“The concentration of aid to basic education among just a few donors means that financial assistance for countries is highly unpredictable,” said Kevin Watkins, Director of the UNESCO report.

The current global economic crisis could drive aid for basic education even lower, possibly even driving assistance down more than $1 billion by 2010, the study warned.

“This is not the time to be cutting aid to basic education,” Mr. Watkins said. “With the economic downturn pushing millions of vulnerable households into poverty and putting budgets under strain, donors should be providing a fiscal stimulus aimed at keeping children in school.”

The new report put the price tag for meeting key education goals in the world’s poorest countries at $11 billion, of which only one-quarter was received in 2007.

“Millions of children stand to be hardest hit by the [current economic] crisis, and face irreversible long-term consequences if denied health, nutrition and education,” said Koïchiro Matsuura, Director-General of UNESCO. “We must invest in their future and provide them with the education they need to end poverty and improve their lives.”

 [ send green star]
 
 December 29, 2008 11:29 PM

Philip Clarke has just read and signed the petition: Be an Advocate for Education in Conflict Nations

You can view this petition at: http://www.thepetitionsite.com/tell-a-friend/2676259

Message from Philip Clarke:
-----

Hi, I signed the petition "Be an Advocate for Education in Conflict Nations". I'm asking you to sign this petition to help us reach our goal of 7,500 signatures. I care deeply about this cause, and I hope you will support our efforts.

-----
ThePetitionSite.com provides tools and empowers individuals to make a difference and effect positive change through online activism. Get connected with the causes you care about, take action to make the world a better place, and start your own petition at
http://www.ThePetitionSite.com!

ThePetitionSite.com is powered by Care2, the largest and most trusted information and action site for people who care to make a difference in their lives and the world. www.care2.com



 [ send green star]
 
 October 12, 2008 10:45 PM

GLOBAL PROGRESS IN LITERACY MASKS SHARP REGIONAL GAPS, UN REPORT FINDS

New York, Oct 6 2008 6:10PM
Global literacy rates continue to rise but some regions are still lagging sharply behind in the campaign to ensure that everyone can read and write, a United Nations report released today finds.

The report, from the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), says the world literacy rate should reach almost 87 per cent by 2015. The number of illiterate adults has also fallen by nearly 100 million in the past 15 years.

But the report – released at the halfway mark of the UN Literacy Decade (2003-2012) – notes that certain regions, particularly South and West Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, are struggling to keep up with progress elsewhere and called for new strategies to improve literacy rates in those parts of the world.

“As we begin the second half of the United Nations Literacy Decade, the international community must seek new ways to work with marginalized populations for whom traditional approaches have proved ineffective,” said UNESCO Director-General Koïchiro Matsuura.

While the period of 2000-2006 pushed the global adult literacy rate up from 76 per cent to 83.6 per cent, UNESCO said such figures mask considerable regional disparities.

For instance, 75 per cent of the 774 million illiterate adults live in only 15 countries – including Bangladesh, Brazil, China, India and Nigeria. And in some sub-Saharan African countries, the number of non-literate adults has increased in recent years by approximately 30 million.

The literacy gender gap also remains almost unchanged, with 63 per cent of illiterate adults at the end of 1994 being women compared to 64 per cent in 2006.


Under such circumstances, three quarters of the 127 countries for which projections were calculated will miss the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of halving adult illiteracy rates by 2015.


Several initiatives have been undertaken by the UN agency to boost the promotion of literacy, including three plans to improve the management and adaptability of literacy programmes and a series of regional and sub-regional conferences in 2007 and 2008 which gave new momentum to policy focus on literacy.


The other recommendations in the report include the need to boast national government and donor organization funding, while improving the delivery of literacy programmes, notably by adapting teaching methods to diverse contexts and demands.


Meanwhile, a lunch will be held tomorrow with the participation of First Lady of the United States Laura Bush, UNESCO’s Honorary Ambassador for the UN Literacy Decade, marking the launch of a new publication entitled The Global Literacy Challenge.

In Seoul, a UNESCO conference – “Building Equitable and Sustainable Societies in Asia and Pacific: the Challenge of Adult Learning” – will be held from today until 8 October to review key issues in adult learning and propose strategies to renew policies and action.

Today in Paris also marked the <"http://portal.unesco.org/en/ev.php-URL_ID=43585&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html">signing of a memorandum of understanding for a strategic partnership between UNESCO and the Inter-American Development Bank (ID, which aims to undertake joint activities in Latin America and the Caribbean in areas including capacity building for the achievement of Education for All (EFA).

 [ send green star]
 
 September 28, 2008 7:28 PM

UNESCO SEEKS TO BOOST LITERACY, ADULT EDUCATION IN LATIN AMERICA AND CARIBBEAN

New York, Sep 10 2008 9:10AM
A three-day conference organized by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) begins today in Mexico City with the spotlight on literacy and adult education in Latin America and the Caribbean, where almost 40 million people lack the reading and writing skills needed for daily life and work.

The region is marked by sharp disparities in literacy rates, with 91 per cent of adults in Latin America able to read, compared to 74 per cent in the Caribbean.

The event, called “From Literacy to Lifelong Learning: Towards the Challenges of the 21st Century,” comes on the heels of World Literacy Day, which was commemorated on Monday.

According to UNESCO, some 110 million young people do not finish primary school, leaving them without the literary skills necessary to fully engage in their communities.

Education ministers, other government officials, experts, representatives of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and others will review the issues pertaining to youth and adult literacy and learning, taking into account other goals such as poverty eradication, promoting peace and democracy and the need for justice and social cohesion.

The conference is one of five regional gatherings hosted by UNESCO ahead of the Sixth International Conference on Adult Education next May in Brazil.

Meanwhile, Dominican song writer and performer Juan Luis Guerra has been named a UNESCO Artist for Peace, joining a host of other world-renowned personalities who work to promote the agency’s message and programmes.

UNESCO is bestowing this designation on Mr. Guerra, an internationally recognized merengue musician, in recognition of his work to benefit children with disabilities and children in need, and his dedication to the ideals and aims of the Organization.

Mr. Guerra will work with the agency for the next two years to promote UNESCO programmes in the field of education for handicapped children.

 [ send green star]
 
 June 15, 2008 2:36 AM

Improving girls' access to education focus of
UN Asia-Pacific meeting
– (11 June 2008)

United Nations
officials, government leaders and education experts are gathering in
Kathmandu, Nepal, today for the start of a two-day conference examining how
to improve gender equality in schools across the Asia-Pacific
region.



The meeting has been set up by the Global Advisory
Committee of the UN Girls Education Initiative (UNGEI) to measure the
progress so far to boost girls' access to schooling, according to a press
statement issued by the UN Children's Fund (

 [ send green star]
 
 May 24, 2008 11:09 PM

UN CULTURAL AMBASSADORS CALL FOR EDUCATION FOR ALL

New York, May 21 2008 3:00PM
A group of celebrity ambassadors with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (<"http://portal.unesco.org/en/ev.php-URL_ID=29008&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html">UNESCO) today called for greater efforts to provide “education for all” at their annual meeting at the agency’s headquarters in Paris.

“Education is a fundamental human right, yet millions of children and adults around the world are still deprived of access to basic education and technology” said Princess Firyal of Jordan and French musician Jean Michel Jarre on behalf of the 19 Goodwill Ambassadors present at the meeting.

In their statement, the ambassadors also said that respect for cultural diversity and languages is a key to social development and peace, and added that there should be a renewed focus on the environment. “Now is the time to face up to the challenges of an over-exploited planet and to take steps to preserve it for generations to come,” they said.

The Goodwill Ambassadors committed themselves to work on raising awareness about global warming.

“2008 is the International Year of Planet Earth. This is a timely opportunity for us all to be less self-centred and to strive for a better future” added Jean Michel Jarre.

Meeting on the World Day for Cultural Diversity for Dialogue and Development and during the International Year of Languages, the UNESCO Goodwill Ambassadors noted that half of the world’s 7000 languages currently face extinction. They also made a plea to governments to promote bi- and multilingual education, and to respect mother languages in all countries.

 [ send green star]
 
 May 11, 2008 1:37 AM

UN AND COMPUTER MAKER HP PARTNER TO BOOST IT SKILLS OF AFRICA’S YOUNG PEOPLE

New York, May 8 2008 3:00PM
The United Nations Industrial Development Organization (<"http://www.unido.org/">UNIDO) and Hewlett-Packard (HP) have joined forces to help young unemployed people across Africa build their entrepreneurial and information technology (IT) skills, it was announced today.

The Graduate Entrepreneurship Training Through IT (GET-IT) initiative will initially be launched in six nations – Egypt, Morocco, Nigeria, South Africa, Tunisia and Uganda – and eventually be expanded further to span the African continent.

The scheme seeks to train youth and graduates, who are between the ages of 16 and 25 and do not have jobs, acquire IT skills and run their own businesses.

GET-IT courses will focus on teaching practical solutions for businesses in finance, management, marketing and technology management.

“By providing IT technology, curricula and training for entrepreneurs, we aim to foster jobs and opportunities in Africa,” said Kandeh K. Yumkella, UNIDO Director-General.

HP started the programme last year in 18 countries in Europe, the Middle East and Africa, and its new partnership with the UN will allow it to extend its reach in Africa.

“It is essential that UNIDO assists developing countries in Africa in educating their young generation in information technology and creating achievable prospects,” Mr. Yumkella noted.

 [ send green star]
 
 April 26, 2008 10:10 PM

MILLIONS OF AFGHAN CHILDREN, MAINLY GIRLS, STILL NOT ATTENDING SCHOOL – UN

New York, Apr 21 2008 2:00PM
Although over 6 million children returned to Afghanistan’s classrooms a month ago at the start of a new school year, United Nations agencies <"http://www.unama-afg.org/news/_pc/_english/2008/08april21.html">said today that half of the war-torn country’s young people are excluded from receiving an education, the bulk of them girls.

“In Afghanistan, despite progress in school enrolment, in the last two years half of the school-age children were estimated to be out of school,” Shigeru Aoyagi, Country Director of the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (<"http://portal.unesco.org/en/ev.php-URL_ID=29008&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html">UNESCO) told journalists in the capital, Kabul, today.

Among those not enrolled in school are nomadic children, children with disabilities, street children and children living with their mothers in prison. However, the majority of those who are not receiving an education are girls.

This is the case even though the enrolment of girls, who were barred from going to school under the repressive Taliban regime, has increased significantly in the past five years, according to the UN Children’s Fund (<"
http://www.unicef.org">UNICEF).

“We still have 1.2 million girls of school age who do not have access to schools,” said Catherine Mbengue, UNICEF Country Representative in Afghanistan. “We have a lot of work to do to make sure all conditions are met so that schools are friendly to girls.”

The reasons why so many children are not in school include a lack of teachers, schools sited close to families, educational materials and, in some areas, security.

To address the challenges associated with education in Afghanistan, UN agencies, in collaboration with the Government, are involved in the construction of schools; teacher training – particularly of female teachers; the provision of textbooks and other materials; and talking with families and community and religious leaders on the importance of education.

“The involvement of communities, of parents, of society as a whole in education is a must in this country, given that we have a lot of gaps in terms of finance, in terms of human resources, in terms of access,” noted Mr. Aoyagi. “If we just stick to the promotion of formal education and if we are not aware of the limitation of formal education we cannot promote education for all in this country.”

Today is the start of <"
http://www.unicef.org/media/media_39442.html ">Global Action Week for Education, in which countries all over the world reaffirm their commitment to achieving the “Education for All” goals set by over 160 countries at the <"http://www.unesco.org/education/efa/wef_2000/">2000 World Education Conference in Dakar, Senegal.

 [ send green star]
 
 April 20, 2008 3:52 PM

GOAL OF UNIVERSAL PRIMARY EDUCATION UNDER THREAT FROM LACK OF FUNDS, SAYS UN

New York, Apr 18 2008 1:00PM
The internationally agreed goal of universal primary education for every child by 2015 is at risk unless donors scale up aid for basic education, according to a new report published today by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (<"http://portal.unesco.org/en/ev.php-URL_ID=29008&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html">UNESCO).

The report – prepared by the team that monitors progress towards the goal of “education for all,” the pledge made by world leaders in Dakar, the Senegalese capital, in 1999 – found that while aid to basic education increased in 2006 to $5 billion, up from $3.7 billion in 2005, it remained below its 2004 level of $5.3 billion.

In addition, bilateral aid to basic education increased from $2.7 billion in 2005 to $3.9 billion in 2006, while commitments from multilateral agencies remained constant at $1.1 billion.

The data also showed that total official development assistance (ODA) decreased by 8.4 per cent last year, which probably means a corresponding reduction in aid to basic education.

UNESCO Director-General Koïchiro Matsuura said that the fact that aid to basic education increased in 2006 over the previous year was encouraging. However, the “general slowdown” in how much donors are committing to education was still a concern.

“This could carry serious consequences for educational progress in low-income countries,” said Mr. Matsuura. “These countries need enough aid and predictable aid to support the rapid expansion of their education systems.”

The overall increase in 2006, according to the report, was mainly due to increased contributions from the Netherlands and the United Kingdom, whose combined aid to basic education rose by $1.3 billion.

Noting that some $11 billion a year is needed to achieve education for all in low-income countries, the report urged donors to step up their efforts, in particular by allocating at least 10 per cent of their sector aid to basic education.

 [ send green star]
 
 April 05, 2008 7:32 PM

SCHOOL ENROLMENT SOARS IN SOUTHERN SUDAN THANKS TO UN-BACKED INITIATIVE


New York, Apr 2 2008 2:00PM
Some 1.3 million children in southern Sudan are expected to start classes this year, compared to just 340,000 in 2005, thanks to an initiative supported by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) to boost school enrolment and strengthen the education system.

The “Go to School” Initiative was launched a year after the January 2005 signing of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA), which ended the north-south civil war that killed as many as two million people and displaced 4.5 million others.

Underscoring the need to build on the gains made so far, <"http://www.unicef.org/media/media_43443.html">UNICEF Country Representative in Sudan Ted Chaiban stressed that education is the single most important investment for southern Sudan. “We need a determination that is unshaken to get every southern Sudanese child into school and receiving a quality education,” he said.

A major milestone has been the increase in the number of girls in school – some 34 per cent of the 1.3 million children now in school. During the civil war less than 1 per cent of girls completed their primary education.

Along with promoting enrolment, UNICEF has also been supporting the Government of Southern Sudan in building over 200 new permanent classrooms, rehabilitating nearly 300 existing classrooms, and providing 400 emergency classroom tents while construction gets under way. A 2006 survey showed that only 16 per cent of the nearly 3,000 schools in the region had permanent buildings.

The initiative has also supported the training of 5,000 teachers, and distributed millions of school supplies to students and instructors.

Mr. Chaiban said the focus this year is on constructing more permanent classrooms, continued teacher training and the strengthening of an information management system.

“By working closely with the Government of Southern Sudan and other partners, we are confident that more and more children will enjoy their right to a quality education, delivered in a quality environment,” he stated.

 [ send green star]
 
 March 15, 2008 8:27 PM

EDUCATION FOR ALL IN HIGH-POPULATION COUNTRIES DISCUSSED AT UN-BACKED MEETING


New York, Mar 10 2008  1:00PM
Ministers and educational experts from nine countries that contain half the world’s people and are plagued by illiteracy convened today to strategize on ways to more quickly achieve universal education, according to the United Nations cultural agency.  

Officials from the world’s nine high population countries - known as the E-9 group and comprising Bangladesh, Brazil, China, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Nigeria and Pakistan – are <"http://portal.unesco.org/education/en/ev.php-URL_ID=56078&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html">meeting this week in Bali, Indonesia, under the auspices of the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural organization (UNESCO).

In 1993, working with UNESCO, these countries launched the E-9 Initiative to address basic education, teacher training and gender disparities.

They have pledged to universalize primary education and significantly reduce illiteracy in their respective countries by 2015, in keeping with the goals set by over 160 countries at the 2000 World Education Conference in Dakar.

However, the 2008 Education for All Global Monitoring <"http://portal.unesco.org/education/en/ev.php-URL_ID=55025&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html">Report published by UNESCO warns that while significant progress has been achieved, only two of the nine countries are likely to reach literacy goals and only three are likely to achieve gender parity by the target year.

Improving the number and quality of teachers is seen as a key to further progress and the subject is high on the agenda, since in many of the E-9 countries less than half of the teachers have educational training.

The use of information and communication technologies, as well as open and distance learning for teachers will also be discussed, along with global teaching trends and funding, UNESCO said.

The seventh meeting of the E-9 group will run until Wednesday

 [ send green star]
 
 March 15, 2008 7:49 PM

HUNDREDS OF TEACHERS TO BE TRAINED IN SOUTHERN SUDAN THROUGH JAPANESE GRANT: UN


New York, Mar 10 2008  6:00PM
A Japanese grant of $8.7 million to the United Nations refugee agency will make it possible for hundreds of teachers to be formally trained in southern Sudan in the next three years, the partners announced today.

The funding will support the construction of Teacher Training Institutes (TTIs) in Juba and Aweil, two key cities of southern Sudan, where a decades-long civil-war decimated the education system, Japan and the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) said in a <" http://www.reliefweb.int/rw/RWB.NSF/db900SID/RMOI-7CKNCQ?OpenDocument">joint press release.  

Along with these TTIs, the project will also cover the building of five satellite primary schools where teachers in training will conduct classes as part of their hands-on experience.

“The programmes developed by the UN and Partners for the education sector are aligned to achieve the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology’s overall goal of ensuring equitable access to quality education services for sustainable development,” UNHCR Representative Chrysantus Ache said at a signing ceremony held on Friday in Juba, the capital of southern Sudan.

In addition to <" http://www.unhcr.org/home.html">UNHCR, the project also involves the UN Children’s Fund (<"http://www.unicef.org">UNICEF), the education sector lead, as well as the UN World Food Programme (<" http://www.wfp.org/english/">WFP) and the UN Food and Agricultural Organization (<" http://www.fao.org">FAO), which are expected to provide nutritional assistance and help with school gardens, respectively.

The South Sudan Ministry of Education, Science and Technology aims to have 10,000 fully qualified teachers by 2011.

 [ send green star]
 
 March 01, 2008 9:01 PM

OVER 6 MILLION AFGHAN CHILDREN TO START NEW SCHOOL YEAR WITH UN SUPPORT


New York, Feb 25 2008 12:00PM
As more than 6 million children in Afghanistan prepare to start a new school year in a few weeks, the United Nations Children’s Fund (<"http://www.unama-afg.org/_latestnews/2008/08feb25-unicef-back-school.html">UNICEF) is working to ensure that both boys and girls in the strife-torn nation have access to quality education in a safe environment.  

To prepare for the new school year which begins on 22 March, UNICEF is providing learning materials for students and teacher kits.  It is also planning to support the Ministry of Education in constructing nearly 300 schools this year, training 48,000 teachers and developing textbooks and syllabi.  

While the number of children expected in school this year is close to 6.2 million, up from last year’s 5.7 million last year, a number of challenges remain, including gender disparity among students, a shortage of qualified teachers and attacks on schools.  

UNICEF estimates that 32 per cent of boys complete primary school while only 13 per cent of girls do so.  To address this situation, the agency is supporting the Afghanistan Girls’ Education Initiative launched last year and supporting the Government in its goal to enrol an additional 330,000 girls in school this year.  

“This is a big challenge for all of us, the Afghan nation and the Afghan children, to bring about parity, or equality, for children and ensure that all children, whether they are girls or boys, continue to go to school, and complete their schooling, so that they can contribute not only to their own development, but also contribute to the building of the country,” UNICEF’s Deputy Representative in Afghanistan, Sikander Khan, said at a press briefing in Kabul today.  

He added that UNICEF will back the Ministry of Education in supporting community-based schools, “so that girls have the opportunity, in a safe and culturally appropriate environment, to go to school, so that they can also be part of learning process and contribute to the development of this country.”  

The agency is also supporting the Education Ministry in addressing the shortage of teachers in the country and improving the quality of education.  

Another major concern is that attacks on schools, and intimidation in some communities aimed at stopping families from sending their children to school, could undo some of the recent achievements.  

UNICEF is working with local leaders, village elders and religious leaders to identify ways to protect schools and continue education for the millions of children who are returning to school, or will start school for the first time this year.
    

 [ send green star]
 
 March 01, 2008 8:55 PM

SALES OF SOFT TOYS AT SWEDISH RETAILER DONATED TO UN CHILDREN’S EDUCATION PROJECTS


New York, Feb 25 2008  6:51PM
United Nations Children’s Fund (<"http://www.unicef.org/">UNICEF) educational projects in nine countries around the world stand to benefit after the UN agency received nearly $4 million in proceeds from the pre-Christmas sale of soft toys at outlets of the Swedish retail chain IKEA.

The agency announced today in a press release that IKEA’s Soft Toy Campaign, now in its third year, had raised €4.2 million after the retailer donated €1 for every toy it sold around the worldwide between 3 November and 24 December. The funds will be divided between UNICEF and Save the Children education projects.

Philip O’Brien, UNICEF’s director of private fundraising and partnerships, said the agency was grateful to the customers and staff of IKEA who have supported the project, known as ‘One Euro is a Fortune.’

The proceeds will go to UNICEF projects in Albania, Bangladesh, China, Côte d’Ivoire, India, Pakistan, Russia, Sierra Leone and Viet Nam. In one project in Albania, libraries will be opened in some 850 schools – which teach more than 200,000 school children – across the small European country

 [ send green star]
 
LITERACY AND EDUCATION ARTICLES AND LINKS February 23, 2008 5:55 PM

UNICEF PARTNERS WITH GULF CHARITY TO EDUCATE ONE MILLION CHILDREN

New York, Feb 19 2008 11:00AM
The United Nations Children's Fund (<"http://www.unicef.org/media/media_42884.html">UNICEF) has partnered with the Gulf charity Dubai Cares to bring education to one million children in need and help contribute to achieving universal primary education by 2015.

Under the new partnership announced today, Dubai Cares -- launched last September by Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice-President and Prime Minister of the United Arab Emirates and Ruler of Dubai -- will work closely with UNICEF to support education programmes in Africa, Eastern Europe, South Asia and the Middle East.

"Education provides vital opportunities for children and helps communities break the poverty cycle," said UNICEF Executive Director Ann M. Veneman.  

"With the assistance of Dubai Cares, UNICEF can expand its support for education programmes that contribute to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals," she added, referring to the pledges made by world leaders to slash poverty, hunger, disease and illiteracy by 2015.

UNICEF estimates that some 93 million children of primary-school age worldwide do not attend school. Most of them live in sub-Saharan Africa (more than 41 million), South Asia (31.5 million), and the Middle East and North Africa (6.9 million).

As part of the initiative, Dubai Cares will help build and finance a variety of programmes in the field of primary education in developing countries, while UNICEF will support the building of new schools and the rehabilitation of existing ones, improving the quality of education, and achieving gender equality.

Chairman Mohammed Al Gergawi noted that for Dubai Cares, UNICEF is "a natural partner as the UN organization has an incredible track record of more than 60 years in implementing projects to ensure children's rights. It also has effective access to resources and expertise for coordinating large scale initiatives in a number of countries."

 [ send green star]
 
  New Topic              Back To Topics Read Code of Conduct

 

This group:
Labour Unions United, to help Stop Global Extreme Poverty
624 Members

View All Topics
New Topic

Track Topic
Mail Preferences