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100th ANNIVERSARY OF WW1 - Never Forget Those Who Fought For Us
2 months ago

I've transferred your posts to a thread of of their own, Wendy. Thank you so much.

Commemorating the start of WW1, light a candle at 10pm tonight
10 hrs ago

      

WW1 NEWS
A US Navy Curtiss Model H Sea Plane of the First World War. Memorial to First American Airman Killed in WW1 Unveiled in Ireland

Bantry Bay, Cork, Ireland:  A monument to US naval aviator Walford August Anderson, killed in an … [Read More...]

Natatorium 1 National Trust Designates Endangered Hawaii Natatorium Memorial A “National Treasure”

The memorial to those from Hawaii who served their country during the First World War has been … [Read More...]

-894f7b3d5504b070 Coleman, Michigan Unveils Life-Size Native American Doughboy Statue

    As part of Memorial Day 2014 observances, a life-sized bronze statue … [Read More...]

2 months ago
9 hrs ago

RE - this link to light a candle, when you click on the link, it will take you to the page where candles are lit,

> scroll down to the bottom of the page, you will see "home" - for home page, click on that, it will take you to the page with various headings, - click "light candles" then follow what is written from there,

it is a lovely site, with prayers and info , you can light a candle for any purpose, - person - or pet  > here is the link again >>>>

This is the Link if anyone wants to light a candle for anyone, for any reason  x x  http://www.gratefulness.org/candles/candles.cfm?l=eng&gi=Care2

                                            ~

Just a couple of pics, for commemoration of WW1 - p.s  I lit a candle already to remember, those who fought, died and suffered in this terrible war WW1-

                            

                                                    ~

LIGHTS OUT AT 10PM,-11PM THE HOUR WW1 STARTED 100 YEARS AGO TODAY

                    

                                               ~

 

2 months ago

From Wendy's post:

British and German troops play football during the Christmas Day truce in 1914

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                                                 ~

NOW THE WOMEN'S WAR -WW1 

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                                            ~

                      ~

                             ~

                                 ~



2 months ago
9 hrs ago

RE - this link to light a candle, when you click on the link, it will take you to the page where candles are lit,

> scroll down to the bottom of the page, you will see "home" - for home page, click on that, it will take you to the page with various headings, - click "light candles" then follow what is written from there,

it is a lovely site, with prayers and info , you can light a candle for any purpose, - person - or pet  > here is the link again >>>>

This is the Link if anyone wants to light a candle for anyone, for any reason  x x  http://www.gratefulness.org/candles/candles.cfm?l=eng&gi=Care2

                              

2 months ago

Thanks for all the pics and the link to the candles, Wendy. I am quite astounded by the picture of the British and German fellows playing football together on Christmas Day, 1914. One would think they would see how human each other was, and just like themselves. I love that you found the candle link for us. I spent quite a bit of time today looking for a good WW1 Tribute video, but I guess I'm not very good at looking because I didn't find an appropriate one.

More pictures:

All the people in these pictures are now gone, of course. It's hard to look at all the people in the group pics, as well as the smaller groups, and think about the millions of lives that were extinguished in that terrible war.

dd

2 months ago

TThe ungodly conditions of the trenches were pure misery.

xx

2 months ago

dd


This looks like a charcoal or water colour painting, probably taken from a real picture. It's called "A Letter Home At Christmas".

ss


2 months ago

This is a very beautiful little video done by a young woman who has quite a few lovely videos. It's called "SOLDIERS OF PEACE (PEACE POEM)" and says what all of us wish for.

dd

zz

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DOKW-LBlVPo

2 months ago
29 min ago

I lit a candle. It was for my uncle, my mother's brother who was injured and died on November 10, 1918, one day before Armistice Day, the day the war ended. He was shot in the groin on Nov. 9th and died the next day. He was 21 years old. He was memorialized in a certificate signed by General Pershing and posthumously received the Medal of Honor. My son Steve, who was named for my uncle, has the medal and the certificate. Here's the medal and certificate.




2 months ago

Sixteen years after the Great War, in 1934, Bernard Newman and Harold Arpthorp, two British veterans, together wrote 'The Road to La Bassée'.

It is an amazing poem, that describes their return to one of the former battlefields in France.

The Ruins in 1918....
dd

Same place at the time the poem was written in 1934:

ff

2 months ago

I forgot to put in the link to the website above. Here it is.

http://www.greatwar.nl/frames/default-bassee.html

I lit a candle, and I will be turning out my lights tonight for that hour.

Wendy and others who participate in this... please post any news of how it all went. Thanks!

2 months ago

We turned off all the lights, last night , lit a candle, The Road that we live on, was in darkness, soooo quiet, almost like everyone was holding their breath, which I would imagine, is exactly what mant people across the world had done, 100 years ago, on the 4th August, while they waited for news.

we were allowed, the light from the T.V, which I was pleased about, as we watched the special service from West Minster Abbey, stories, poems letters and prayers were read, the letters were from soldiers serving in WW1, also letters from Soldiers wives, at the end of the service, only one candle was burning in the Abbey, that was the Easter Candle, it will burn from last night , for a further 4+half years, which would have been the end of WW1.

In B'ham UK, there was a special day honouring/commemorating WW1, I will show you , when I can get a youtube copy, as it is hard to explain 

           Thank you Cheryl for your hard work, searching out all that info, love the video , on Sunday there is a special drama, written with diaries, and letters of men, women who were living through WW1, some of the letters are from son's to Mom's , and Mom's to son's, others are husband and wives letters written to each other. It will be on BBC 1 8pm 10th Aug.  If anyone can receive the broadcast?.

As the week carries on I will add any photo's or vids that I come across

Lynn that was vey sad about your Uncle, I was saying last night, both my Grand Father's served in WW1, and my Mothers Father again served in WW2, all my grand Uncle's , my two Grand Father's , then my Father and Uncle's returned, from WW1 and WW2.  We were very fortunate. 

For now will sign off, love hugs x wendy k & kelly cats xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

SOME PHOTOS OF THE COMMEMORATIONS FOR WW1 ON 4TH AUGUST 2014
2 months ago

Centenary of the start of the First World War

                                                  ~

Centenary of the start of the First World War

                                                        ~

Grave of the "unknown Soldier"

Centenary of the start of the First World War

                                                ~

Tower of London - poppy installation

August 4th, 2014 marks the 100th anniversary of Great Britain declaring war on Germany. In 1914, British Prime Minister Herbert Asquith announced at 11 pm that Britain was to enter the war after Germany had violated Belgium neutrality. The First World War lasted until 11 November 1918 and is recognised as one of the deadliest historical conflicts, with millions of casualties.

Here, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry view the ceramic poppy art installation by artist Paul Cummins entitled 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red', at its official unveiling in the dry moat of the Tower of London. 

Centenary of the start of the First World War                                                     ~

Centenary of the start of the First World War

                                            ~

                                100 GUN SALUTE

 Centenary of the start of the First World War

                                                      ~

                                         #LIGHTSOUT

LIGHTSOUT OVER HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT

Centenary of the start of the First World War

LIGHTS OUT  DOWNING STREET

 Centenary of the start of the First World War     

LIGHTS OUT TRAFALGAR SQUARE

Centenary of the start of the First World War

LIGHTS OUT MENIN GATE MEMORIAL

Centenary of the start of the First World War

DAWN OVER FLANDERS



This post was modified from its original form on 05 Aug, 8:39
2 months ago

DAWN OVER FLANDERS

Centenary of the start of the First World War

news about Birmingham Pals WWI > (UK)
2 months ago

First World War – Bill Furse and James Rance

During a trip to Northern France in June 2014, I visited the graves of some men whose stories we are featuring in an exhibition about Birmingham and the Royal Warwickshire Regiment during the first world war. The family photograph and letters reproduced here are part of the collection of Dave Vaux.

Bill and Alan Furse
The Furse family

The Furse family (Bill seated to the left and Alan is standing)

Bill Furse and his brother Alan lived in Moseley, Birmingham.  When war broke out Lord Kitchener put out an appeal for volunteers, and many white-collar workers joined the so–called ‘Pals’ battalions. Bill and Alan both joined the 1st Birmingham battalion (also known as the 14th battalion) in September 1914. In this photograph Bill is seated to the left hand side, and Alan is standing.

Letter written by Alan Furse

Letter written by Alan Furse

The Furse brothers were middle-class and their background and education would have qualified them for advancement. Both were commissioned to the rank of 2nd Lieutenant. Alan’s letters home give a vivid picture of life in the British Expeditionary Force. He describes the conditions in the trenches:  ‘Whilst on your tour of duty round in the front line you are floundering knee deep in mud and both sides are slimy with mud so that you have nothing clean to steady yourself by and when you get back to your dugout to rest you have the slimy walls and at least a foot of mud on the floor. You soon learn not to drop things as of course they are useless afterwards and the great trouble is to find somewhere to put something down’.

Alan also writes to his teenage brother Claude, who was an Army Cadet. These letters present the war as a great adventure:  ‘It is a grand sight to see the anti aircraft guns firing at an aeroplane, little puffs like bunches of cotton wool suddenly appearing all round the plane until he gets out of range…Whilst we were walking back to the wood today a couple of shells fell about 100 yds away and kicked up a devil of a row…They are called Whizzbangs because they are of such high velocity and you get no warning of their arrival, just the whiz thro’ the air and then the explosion…’.

Telegram informing of Bill's death

Telegram informing of Bill’s death

Tragically, Alan’s brother Bill was killed on the first day of the battle of the Somme, 1 July 1916. He was 25. Alan was not far away, but he did not hear the news of Bill’s death until several days later when his parents informed him by telegram. Alan’s response to his parents is a prime example of ‘stiff upper lip’, but his grief can be read between the lines:  ‘Thus goes the finest pal I have ever had and one of the best and most straightforward men who ever lived. Of course the shock has been bad for me but what you must feel at home having to sit still I can’t imagine but you must not give way more than you can help. Try and bear up. God grant you all His help at this awful time and give you strength to bear the loss of such a splendid man’.

Bill Furse's headstone

Bill Furse’s headstone

I visited Bill’s grave in June 2014. By the time he died Bill had been transferred to the Tyneside Scottish Brigade, formed of ‘Pals’ battalions of the Northumberland Fusiliers. Bill was temporarily buried where he fell, but was transferred to Bapaume Post Cemetery near Albert after the Armistice.

Alan Furse was discharged on medical grounds later in 1916 and survived the war.

James Edward Weeks Rance

Many men who served in the first world war also went on to fight in the second world war. One example is James Edward Weeks Rance of the 2ndbattalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. He was awarded the Military Cross for his bravery during the first world war.

Jame Rance's headstone

Jame Rance’s headstone

In May 1940 Major Rance, now aged 42, was part of the British Expeditionary Force once again. During the retreat to Dunkirk, he was among those fighting to defend the town of Wormhoudt. During the retreat to Dunkirk, he was among those fighting to defend the town of Wormhoudt, where he was killed

2 months ago

>(continued) Following this battle, 80 Royal Warwicks were taken prisoner by the Waffen-SS division, the Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler.  They were locked into a barn and murdered.

Wormhoudt Communal Cemetery

Wormhoudt Communal Cemetery

Rance is now buried at Wormhoudt Communal Cemetery. A small number of Commonwealth war dead from both world wars lie among civilian graves. It was quite moving to see war graves scattered among the tombs of the local townspeople.

Our exhibition ‘Soldiers’ Stories:  Birmingham and the Royal Warwickshire Regiment 1914 to 1918’ opens on 19 July 2014.

Read the first part of this blog: First World War – Private Fred Andrews

 

Henrietta Lockhart
Curator (History)

Photographs 1-3 courtesy of Dave Vaux.

 

lights out in Piccadilly
2 months ago

#lightsout view from our window
2 months ago

2 months ago
Tower of London’s 888,246 Ceramic Poppies Commemorate Every British Soldier Lost in WWI
Tower of London's 888,246 Ceramic Poppies Commemorate Every British Soldier Lost in WWI (1)
  Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red is a progressive art installation currently on display at the Tower of London. Created by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and stage designer Tom Piper, the installation commemorates the one hundred years since the first full day of Britain’s involvement in World War I. 888,246 ceramic poppies will…


Read more »

2 months ago
  • The Tower of London will feature dramatic art instillation during the summer where poppies will flow Rapunzel-like from its walls filling its moat to commemorate the outbreak of the First World War.  

More than 800,000 ceramic poppies to commemorate each of the allied victims of the First World War.

More than 8,000 volunteers from across the UK will plant the poppies from August 5 to Armistice Day on November 11. 

The poppies are being sold by an independent organisation but members of the public can register through the Historic Royal Palaces website.

The poppies will cost £25 plus postage and packaging with the proceeds going to six service charities, including the Royal British Legion. It is expected that the display should earn raise millions for the charities involved.

Between August 5 and November 11, 180 names of servicemen killed during World War One will be read out at twilight before a lone bugler plays the Last Post. 

Relatives can nominate their ancestor on Twitter by contacting the Historic Royal Palaces on this link and they can discuss the commemoration on Twitter using this hashtag #TOWERPOPPIES. Names on the list are added on a first-come first-served basis.

Also, the Royal British Legion are sending out free poppy seeds to every school in the country to raise awareness of the centenary of the conflict's outbreak.

A ceramic poppy is being planted for each of the allied victims of World War One outside the Tower of  London 

A ceramic poppy is being planted for each of the allied victims of World War One outside the Tower of  London 

The art display featuring more than 800,000 ceramic poppies will continue to grow until Armistice Day
Inspiration for the Flanders Fields Memorial Poppy
Miss Moina Belle Michael (4)Portrait of Moina Michael

The origin of the red Flanders poppy as a modern-day symbol of Remembrance was the inspiration of an American woman, Miss Moina Michael.

I will send out messages , but ........... any way hope this pic doesn't shrink , 

Jacket cover of The Miracle Flower by Moina Michael.

LEST WE FORGET     XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

2 months ago

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Cats lived with Soldiers in the trenches during WW1 to kill the mice & rats

The cat here in this pic, is saying , stop lets go !!!!!

2 months ago

Although the dishes could be plain, cooks were taught to look for nettles, sweet docks, wild mushrooms and marigold flowers with which to season dishes.

There was no official vegetarian option, although provision was made for Indian personnel, which included mixed spices of ginger, turmeric, chillies and garlic, Dhal (lentils) and Attar (Wheat flour). Vegetarians received additional Gur (cane sugar) or milk instead of meat. Other variations were also produced for the Chinese Labour Corps and Egyptian Labour Corps and Fijian Labourers.

Cooks were careful to avoid all waste. Leftovers were sold as swill to local farmers, while dripping was saved for use in the manufacture of explosives.

While those tips might not be of much use to modern chef, the guide does contain other advice given to army cooks that could still prove practical.

These include rubbing hands on a stick of celery after peeling onions, to remove the smell; not boiling cabbage with a lid on; pricking sausages and plunging them into boiling water for five minutes before frying, to make them more digestible; and adding a walnut size piece of fat to prevent greens from boiling over.

Cooks were also taught to make bacon go twice as far by dipping the rashers into flour or oatmeal, to prevent too much being lost with the fat.

Perhaps less appetising, there are also hints about what to do with stale bread – either put in cold water and rebake for an hour, or put slices in milk and then bake to make “delicious” rusks.

Recipes: How to cook First World War food

“Brown Stew”

Ingredients: meat, onions, flour, mixed vegetables, pepper, salt, stock

• Bone meat, remove fat, cut into 1oz pieces.

• Place 3lb flour, ½oz pepper, ½oz salt in a bowl and mix

• Place stock into bottom of cooking vessel and dredge meat in flour

• Peel and cut up onions, wash and peel and cut up the mixed vegetables, add onions and vegetables to meat, mix well together and barely cover with stock and place in over to cook

• Stir frequently

• Time 2½ to 3 hours

“Potato Pie”

Ingredients: meat, potatoes, onions, pepper, salt, stock

• Wash, peel, rewash potatoes, cut large ones into halves lengthways

• Bone meat cutting away fat, if meat is lean cover with slices of fat

• Place potatoes in tin dish, peel and cut up onions and sprinkle over the potatoes; add 1½oz pepper and 3oz of salt then pour over a little stock or water

• Place dish in oven and turn joint at half time, add stock when necessary

• Time 15 minutes to each lb of meat

1 month ago

It's almost midnight here, August 6 going into August 7 in about 10 minutes. I'm sorry I haven't been on the other threads as I said I would be today. I have been so zoned out on this thread and all it stands for. I have found different websites, stared at the pictures of the men, some looking no more than 15 (which some actually were after sneaking past all the regulations, interviews, etc.).

THANK YOU SO MUCH WENDY and LYNN. These are amazing pictures! I love to read the letters most of all, especially when they have a picture of the man who wrote it. Notice how eloquent they are? The same with the WW2 letters available to read. I get so involved in them -- probably too involved as I spend hours reading them and looking at pictures, and imagining what it must have been like. Today I've spent five hours looking at so much to do with WW1. I can't believe how fast the time went! I will (hopefully) get to other threads tomorrow. 

IT IS SO NICE THAT THIS MEMORIAL LASTS MORE THAN ONE DAY TO SO MANY PEOPLE OF TODAY. Here are a few pictures I got today you might find interesting.

WENDY... love your experience and pictures of 'lights out'. It was nice you could have the TV on to watch the services.

During times when men had some 'free' moments, many did the most amazing drawings, (later turning to painting -- I would imagine when they were hospitalized or finally made it home; I can't see them having water colours or oils to use in the trenches!) Along with these creations, we are blessed that so many wrote journels and letters.

dd 

ssThere was an explanation about this one -- something to the effect of "the boys...." I went back to find it and alas, can't! Mad at myself.

"These examples of trench art were no doubt made in the inter-war years and are composed of British 18 pdr shrapnel shells, fuses and cartridge cases plus German Mauser bullets. The religious aspect of these can be seen in many examples in France. Those sections from the shell would have taken some cutting!"

dd
SWANSEA CITY, WALES

"Following Britain’s declaration of war on 4 August 1914, Australia along with other British Empire nations found themselves also at war.

As the most populous and developed state at the time, NSW felt the impact intensely. Tens of thousands of soldiers never returned home and were buried where they died on the battlefields of Turkey, France, Belgium and Palestine.

The ANZAC Memorial in Hyde Park is the State’s principal memorial to the heavy casualties of the First World War and a fitting place to reflect on the grief and sacrifice of this war."


ss

ss

The statues are almost eerie as they watch silently from their positions. There are many more pics as the bldg. is quite large, but I couldn't screenshot them all.
I was in Australia when I was age 20 and saw an "ANZAC Parade", which deeply affected me. I had no idea what it represented when we unexpectedly came upon it. To see these veterans walking together down the street was an emotional experience. I say, "walk" but a lot were helping one another, many had canes and crutches, amputated legs/arms, and some were in wheelchairs. They were dressed in their finest with medals covering their chests. All was very silent as they passed by the crowds of people. They were proud -- of themselves and each other. They were brothers.

cc 


I believe this is in Belgium. There is only one American grave (this one) and a number of other soldiers from other countries are buried here as well. Hopefully I will find the explanation to this picture, which I copied - somewhere!


1 month ago

It's now 1:18AM... time goes so fast! One more picture tonight.

ss


"The "Dodengang" are the last preserved original Belgian trenches from WWI featuring galleries, shelters, firesteps, chicanes, concrete duckboards and concrete sandbags. The Dixmude trenches were held by the Belgians for over four years during the Battles of the Yser against the Germans who were at some points only a few yards away. A German bunker is visible at stone’s throw length from these trenches even nowadays.

 Fierce fighting took place here with raids from both sides and sniper fire was always a danger for anyone not careful enough. Conditions were often poor when the rains turned the flanders clay into mud. Only the officers had dugouts to sleep protected. The high casualty rates in this section of the front gave these trenches their grim name. Note the Poppies which can be found in abundance near these battlefields."

ss

Four or five Canadian troops in the trenches, looking exhausted. One looks like he may be writing a letter home. I can't help but wonder if any of them made it home.

ss

Hmm. I wonder what the "Victory Boys" were all about. Must look that up.

WENDY, my son's Dad was born in Birmingham so that's quite interesting to my son. His Dad came over here to BC when he was about age 10 with his Mum, older brother and sister. He wore short pants and had an accent and the kids made fun of him. That was until.... he bopped a few of them! He was a big kid - no skinny weakling. After the initial  "boppings" he no longer was bulled and teased. Besides that, we got long pants to wear.

ss

This pic just said "WW1 British soldiers."

Cheryl thanks for your hard work, this is a clip, of B'ham's display for the "Chelsea flower Show 20
1 month ago

Birmingham City UK, Minimum Monument WW1
1 month ago

This was a very poignant "Act of Remembrance"

                                                ~

                                            ~

                                                     ~

                                               ~

1 month ago

 photo flanderField1_zps1e66db15.jpg

1 month ago

Hi sisters. I have been looking through so many photos and comments during the last three hours. I am utterly absorbed with all the information and the faces that look back at me from photos taken long ago. I will be back later to post some.

Wendy, that video showing the display is wonderful. The bicycle in there reminds me of what you said about all the messengers who were killed. When the sounds came on, one has to wonder what it was like to hear those all day and night, month after month. I am thinking of WW2 as well.

The ice sculptures are incredible! Silent representation of so many lives, yet not so silent because they make us think and wonder who each one was, and the families who lost them.

Sandi, thanks for the Flanders Field post! John McCrae was truly inspired to write this, as so many men and women facing possible death during WW1 and WW2 were inspired to do brave and amazing things.

I have to post this song! While I was looking at WW1 pictures on Flykr, there was a link below one that led to VERA LYNN singing the White Cliffs of Dover. Even though that was a WW2 song, I have no doubt how many people would have benefitted from it during WW1. She had such an AMAZING voice - meant to be heard at that time. This video leads into more of her soul-touching songs. I wasn't around for WW2 but somehow I have to fight back a tear or two when I hear some of the songs - like this one. They still played long after the war and that's probably when some of them infiltrated my brain and decided to stay!

aa

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hqtaoz4QFX8

1 month ago

Wendy, (copying here as requested), that's a wonderful way to commemorate the war dead in the UK.  Who could have believed that the assassination of Arch Duke Ferdinand would start all the horrific slaughter.  Thanks for all the info and pictures.  Canadian, Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, who wrote the poem - In Flanders Fields - was born in Guelph, Ontario, a half hour car ride from where I live.  The home is now a museum. 

Here is his page on the Veterans Affairs Canada website.  (added August 13th, there are excerpts from his letters home to his mother about his experiences treating the wounded in the trenches etc. at this link)

http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/remembrance/history/first-world-war/mccrae

Here are 2 articles that give the whole story and tell how the poem was very nearly never published to become the icon it has today.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_Flanders_Fields

http://www.arlingtoncemetery.net/flanders.htm

After reading articles and watching documentaries about the first world war, it befuddles the mind that the world went insane again and again going to ever increasingly worse wars.  We also have a few programs about the 100 year commemoration, but nothing is set like it is in the UK for a National day of Rememberance of the start of the war.  Possibly because most of the fighting was in Europe and the Middle East.  I found one article on the CBC website asking how Canadian communities were commemorating the start of the war, most comment posts were against such an occurrence saying they preferred to celebrate the end of the war instead.  Nothing is planned where I live.  My only thought on this is - NEVER AGAIN - Couldn't find a decent video copy of the PSA, but the sound is perfect.  The Canadian War Amps put this out a number of years ago, while my hero Cliff Chadderton was running the organization.

1 month ago

Forgot about this link I wanted to post.  Our National TV network has a Tribute page for WW1.  The first article was only posted this morning.  It is about how the Canadian troops were given unreliable and dangerous rifles to fight with.  Very interesting reading and lots of other links on the page too.

http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/first-world-war-100th-anniversary

Then there is the story about Passendale, the 3rd battle of Ypres, arguably the worst battle of the war as far as casualties and conditions.  Paul Gross a Canadian actor/writer made a movie about it a few years ago.  Here are a couple of links about that battle.

http://www.warmuseum.ca/cwm/exhibitions/guerre/passchendaele-e.aspx

http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/remembrance/history/first-world-war/fact_sheets/passchendaele

1 month ago

Sue , great posts, Cheryl too, you both worked hard looking up things to share thank you.

I watched a programme that explained a little about the shambolic way, the troops were led by the Officers, in WW1. 

There had never been warfare like it before, those in charge, were planning attacks,- that they were used to, -such as "close combat" of the 19th Century wars,- suddenly inventions such as "The Gatling Gun" and later day "Machine Gun" volted them into a 20th Centry war. They were ill equipped , ill informed, ill advised, -> yet sent thousands to the slaughter , to fight in "close combat", those poor souls were mowed down by the -progress in weaponary, shot as soon as they stood up from the trenches.

So very sad, and to me it makes the little figures of ice that were gently placed on the steps in Chamberlain Square in B'ham Uk, all the more poignant.

Please God never again .

Those that move the hate -war machine, have to be stopped. It will take every Nation to do it, or it will never work, and we will continue to ask, "Please God never again"

Love to all, here lets make a BIG DEAL of all those who died, in hope the message will get through xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

1 month ago

Thanks, Sue. I read much more than I was going to read tonight because I got so involved. The video and song bring me to tears. Those aren't actors, they are the real flesh and blood men who ... yes... were slaughtered. When you see someone fall, to know it wasn't an actor but a real man, someone's son, brother, friend, husband, father...

The song and music... wow, that really hits "home" where the heart is.

"Never again take up arms against a brother...

Never again take a life without knowing why..."

And so it keeps on happening, AGAIN and AGAIN. When I saw what ISIS in Iraq did to many hundreds... maybe thousands... of men, and kidnapped more than 1,000 women to be brutalized, I can't help but want them bombed off the face of the earth because there is no changing a heart that could do the evil things they are doing.

John McCrae was a compassionate, talented, caring human being and it was extremely interesting looking at his handwriting. I studied handwriting analysis for four years when I was in my 20s. Two of the prosecutors I worked for used to bring me samples of writing of persons who were murderers, rapists, etc. and ask me to tell them something about that person from their handwriting. I didn't want to do it but they wanted anything I could "read"  for their own interest. John McCrae's writing shows his attachment to others, his sense of comradeship is so evident, even though it's been so many years since I've practiced analysis (there are always some things you never forget, as in writing short hand).

War is so damn senseless. One side kills the other side and on and on it goes back and forth. President Kennedy said, "Mankind must do away with war or war will do away with mankind." What do you think our chances are for world peace?

RIGHT NOW I SAY... JUST KEEP SENDING OUT ALL THE POSITIVE PEACE VIBES WE CAN. IF ALL THE PEACE-LOVING PEOPLE IN THE WORLD DID THIS TOGETHER, NIGHT AND DAY... LIKE SHIFTWORK...  I THINK IT MIGHT PERMEATE THROUGH TO WAR-MONGERING HEARTS... that reminds, me, I've got to keep those PEACE candles lit!

I'll be back tomorrow to finish reading those last two links. Thanks Wendy and Sue. Amazing to read and see, and to never forget the hell our fighters went through and died for.

1 month ago

Cheryl, you were spot on about John McCrae, he never fully recovered from his experiences treating the wounded.  (Remind me never to write to you by hand, you'd find out all my secrets!).  When I read his biography it said he lived in a tent upon his return home and did not take care of himself, he died a broken man shortly after.  Remember how the surgeons in the series MASH had troubles coming to terms with what they had to do on a daily basis?

The unseen injuries that soldiers and civilians suffered as a result of the war lasts for generations.  My parents lived in London during the Blitz of WW2 and both suffered undiagnosed PTSD.  Everyone in my family older than them lived in London and they were all suffering in one way or another.  The same with our soldiers today, never getting the treatment they so badly deserve.  I doubt there is a country on the planet that takes care of it's soldiers properly after they go home.

Sadly at any given time there are about 30 wars taking place on the planet, most do not get reported on.  It's disheartening to say the least. 

Back in the 70's I read a news report that said the UK had signed an agreement with the US that in case of another war the US would have the right to direct the UK forces and use (force) any civilian with the required skills to be made to use their skills in the war effort.  I was a key punch operator at the time and my job was on the list of required skills.  If they had tried to get me to work for them they would have met a resistance they never though possible.  I refused to do anything to promote any kind of war back then as vehemently as I do now.

I agree with you, the people in charge of things need to learn how to talk with each other and achieve peace the sensible way, without bloodshed.  Eventually that day will dawn, just hope it does not take too long.

1 month ago

Hi Sue - Not knowing about PTSD symptoms, or even having such a diagnosis as PTSD back then, I remember being so stunned to find out that "shell shock" was somewhat recognized, but many soldiers suffering from shell shock were thought to be deserters as they wandered around and left their post - and were shot! Geeez! The only country that did not shoot their soldiers was Australia. 

Just before we had the last of the Canadians come back from Iraq/Afghanistan, we had two suicides of vets, almost with a day of one another. Shocking, shocking, shocking! How many more American,British, Canadian and any other men and women from the "good side" actually survived being at the front only to return home and die? They need psychological help right after they step off the plane or boat and that should be mandatory, in my opinion. They need to not only shed their war clothes, but also the macho - ego - fighter training that gets built into a soldier so they can be confident and "strong" enough to kill when deemed necessary.

In the wake of James Foley being so brutally slaughtered by ISIS or ISIL - whatever they call themselves - a whole new war has started. We may look at his parents who call for compassion and mercy and wonder how they can muster that up within themselves. They are amazing people and had an amazing son. But now - no western, civilized country can NOT be involved. The threats not only affect the States but all of us. I was nodding "yes" during President Obama's short speech. I wonder if anyone would have run for President if they could have seen how many terrible things were going to happen all at once, and decisions had to be made for them all. I am rambling on here, sorry. So much in my head going on!

As to the handwriting - that made me burst out with a big spontaneous laugh. It reminded me of those days in that office with about six other great gals who used to put their hands over their writing whenever I walked by! lol I was always saying, "There could be NOTHING in your psyche you'd have to hide!" We would laugh a lot about that.

I watched a good old movie on the classics channel - love them, Barbara Stanwyck, Bette Davis, etc. They were honouring British actor Herbert Marshall and showed several of his movies. Robert _____? can't think of the host's name - said that Herbert Marshall was in WW1 and lost a leg right up to his hip!

Herbert Marshall:
xx

 

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0003339/



Then I remember hearing that actor David Niven did some undercover work. And Jimmy Stewart was a pilot or something! I was going to look both of them up but got caught up finding and reading the following links, which are SO INTERESTING!

Rin Tin Tin
Spoils of War

Alsatian puppy found in the German trenches around Metz by Doughboy Sgt. Lee Duncan. Became a major Hollywood film star and made at least one B-movie about the war. Who knew that?

     
Here's some great reading about some of the actors and men who fought - some came but and many didn't. There were quite a few who wrote poetry and other things - Hemmingway, for instance. Peter Ustinov was German but spied for the British and later became a British citizen.


http://www.worldwar1.com/dbc/notable1.htm

 

http://s12.zetaboards.com/The_Trench_Line/topic/127256/1/


 

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