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Bridal Store Refuses to Sell Lesbian Bride a Gown

Bridal Store Refuses to Sell Lesbian Bride a Gown

 

Trips to the bridal salon can have their ups and downs, but generally, they don’t end with the store’s proprietor calling several days later and informing the bride-to-be that she is about to participate in an “illegal action.”  Unfortunately for Alix Genter, that’s exactly what happened after she found an almost-perfect wedding dress at a salon called Here Comes the Bride in Somers Point, NJ.  Genter, who is a lesbian, and her partner are planning to get a civil union in New Jersey and marry in New York next July.

“We are very fortunate in that our families love and support us,” Genter told Ronnie Polaneczky, a columnist for the Philadelphia Daily News. “They’re so excited about our wedding.”

They were so excited that Genter was accompanied by no less than six friends and family members.  They helped Genter try on dresses, and together, they found a dress that was nearly ideal — it would have been perfect in a different fabric.  The bridal store owner, Donna, promised to investigate.

In the course of Donna’s investigations, she discovered that Genter had crossed out “groom” and written “partner” on the customer-information sheet, and inserted a woman’s name.  This was so disturbing to Donna that she called Genter to inform her that she could not sell her the dress.

“She said she wouldn’t work with me because I’m gay,” said Genter. “She also said that I came from a nice Jewish family, and that it was a shame I was gay. She said, ‘There’s right, and there’s wrong. And this is wrong.’”

When Polaneczky called Donna to hear her side of the story, Donna produced some very twisted logic.  She explained to Polaneczky that lesbians were just “women who were fed up with men because ‘men can be difficult,’ and so now they ‘experiment’ with female relationships because they’re tired of having men boss them around.”

Perhaps inspired by the 200 negative reviews on Yelp.com, Donna has agreed to sit down and discuss the situation with Genter’s parents.  But of course, she won’t apologize to Genter.

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Photo from Lee J. Haywood via flickr.

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177 comments

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9:34PM PST on Dec 18, 2013

The information you have given in the blog really marvelous and more interesting.

joan calabrese for mon cheri

3:26PM PDT on May 9, 2012

WOW that Donna seems to have a peanut instead a brain, what a waste!

4:00PM PDT on May 4, 2012

I see no reason that a bridal salon has to know anything about anyone but the bride and if need be, the bride's maid(s). If I had had a sheet asking all the questions beyond my name and measurements, I would have refused to fill out the rest.

6:06AM PDT on May 4, 2012

Why does the store have a customer information sheet that asks the name of the groom? I would think the only info they need is the brides's measurements and the date of the wedding. The name of the groom is no more relevent than the location of the wedding, how many guests there will be or how much money is being spent on the reception. Unless the groom is paying for the dress and they need his credit card info, it's none of their business.

2:53PM PDT on Sep 26, 2011

Genter is a horrible woman and she needs to do more than apologize. she has no say in who anyone can marry.

4:19PM PDT on Sep 11, 2011

This is a public store. Isn't Donna breaking the law by not selling the dress to the bride?

9:46PM PDT on Sep 5, 2011

wow...

4:21AM PDT on Aug 26, 2011

DONNA... she shames me of my own name D

5:59PM PDT on Aug 23, 2011

To Donna, the store owner: If you are in business selling dresses, what someone does with your merchandise after it leaves your store is none of your business. You are a merchant selling an item, period. Your personal feelings are not to enter into a business contract. I would advise you to apologize. I would also think if you don't, people should avoid going into your shop as a protest on your business practices. After all, what's next? You decide if the groom doesn't live up to your expectations, you'll tell the bride to forget the sale and dump the groom? Your actions are totally out of context with business practices. You forget gays and lesbians are people too with feelings - they are someone's daughter, son, sister or brother, and if the whole family came in with her, they accepted this fact, why not you?

12:49PM PDT on Aug 23, 2011

@Penny C. -- did you actually read the huffingtonpost article, or are you just being intentionally misleading?? She refused to do photographs for several high-school teens because they were cyberbullying other kids on facebook. It had absolutely nothing to do with the physical appearance of the kids involved. And FYI, while homosexuals are a protected class in NJ anti-discrimination laws, I'm not aware of bullies being a protected class anywhere.

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Lindsay Spangler Lindsay Spangler is a Web Editor and Producer for Care2 Causes. A recent UCLA graduate, she lives in... more
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