Cheerios Just Gave Away 1.5 Billion Wildflower Seeds to Help Save Bees

The earth’s bees are facing serious challenges to their survival. With threats ranging from habitat loss, the use of pesticides and disease to climate change, many species are declining at worrying rates.

Thankfully, they’re not without advocates who are working to help them survive. Bees are getting a boost from Cheerios, made by General Mills, which launched a campaign in partnership with Vesey’s Seeds, encouraging people to plant wildflowers for them.

The goal was to give away 100 million wildflower seeds for free to anyone who signed up for its #BringBacktheBees campaign, and people took them up on the offer in a big way. In all, 1.5 billion wildflower seeds were given out to people all over the country.

They’ve also removed their iconic BuzzBee from boxes of Honey Nut Cheerios, leaving a stark white silhouette in his place to help raise awareness about pollinators.

“As a General Mills cereal built around nutrition, helping pollinators get the key nutrition they need through fun, family-friendly activities like planting wildflowers is a natural fit,” said Susanne Prucha, director of marketing for Cheerios. “Our commitment to increasing the habitat for pollinators is one way we are continuously striving to be a company that not only makes products people love, but a company that pursues creative solutions to make our world a better place for all families.”

According to General Mills, an estimated 30 percent of the ingredients they use for their products rely on pollinators, but the company notes their value goes far beyond that. We have them to thank for an estimated one out of every three mouthfuls of food and drink we consume in the U.S.

Despite their value to us, our actions have led to serious declines in populations of bees and other pollinators. Last year, seven species of bees in Hawaii became the first ever bee species in history to be listed under the Endangered Species Act. They were shortly followed by the first bumble bee species to be listed.

While their continued decline is incredibly worrying, conservation organizations and people around the country are acting to help them by raising awareness, supporting legislation that would protect them, and providing them with the vital food they need in our own backyards.

In addition to its major seed-giveaway and removing its mascot from cereal boxes, General Mills also committed to turning 3,300 acres into dedicated pollinator habitat on farm land that grows oats for Cheerios by 2020, which is expected to double the number of bees in the area. It has also donated $4 million to the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation to support its work protecting pollinators.

To learn how to create your own bee-friendly garden, check out this Care2 article.

For more on how to support the campaign, check out Bring Back the Bees,

Photo credit: Thinkstock

114 comments

Marie W
Marie W27 days ago

Thanks for sharing.

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Melania P
Melania Padilla2 months ago

NO matter if their intentions are dark; this is good

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Elizabeth W
Elizabeth W4 months ago

Thanks.

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heather g
heather g4 months ago

A good marketing tool ... educational too, as young children will ask questions...

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Patricia H
Patricia Harris4 months ago

Marty P, ignorance is bliss, as they say.

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Dorothy W
Dorothy Watkins4 months ago

Well done General Mills!!!! What a wonderful example you set! I hope that other manufacturers follow your lead! Bravo!

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Marty P
Marty P5 months ago

FINALLY A CORPORATION THAT REALIZES THIS PLANET IS IN TROUBLE AND IS TAKING ACTION. WE ARE ABOUT TO LOSE 1/3 OF OUR FOOD SUPPLY AND UNLESS THE CURRENT REPUBLICANS HAVE A SECRET PLAN WHERE WE CAN SURVIVE WITHOUT FOOD THEY NEED TO GET SERIOUS ASAP. BEING TOTALLY IGNORANT AND UNCARING OF THE ENVIRONMENT AS THE REPUBLICANS HAVE BEEN NEEDS TO STOP AND TIME TO BE RESPONSIBLE ADULTS BECAUSE OUR VERY SURVIVAL DEPENDS ON IT.

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Richard E Cooley
Richard E Cooley5 months ago

Thank you.

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Jess B
Jess B5 months ago

Thanks for sharing

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Anna Ballinger
Anna Ballinger5 months ago

Thank you for sharing.

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