START A PETITION 25,136,189 members: the world's largest community for good
START A PETITION
x
911,694 people care about Women's Rights

Dispatches From The War On Women: The American Taliban Is Real

Dispatches From The War On Women: The American Taliban Is Real

Welcome to Dispatches, your round-up of the latest news from the frontlines of the War on Women. Have a story from your state or an idea on how to push back? Share them here and fight back against the War on Women.

A spokesman for Rep. Nan Hayworth (R, NY) insists his public comments that someone should “hurl some acid” at female Democratic senators are being totally blown out of proportion. Apparently when women object to suggestions of a violent attack in the style of the Taliban they are “manufacturing” controversy. Good to know.

A New Jersey Rite Aid reportedly refused to sell a man emergency contraception simply because he’s a man. These cases are becoming more common as religious conservatives feel emboldened to push individual conscience exceptions and double-down on legal access to contraception.

American nuns are not going to be pushed around by the Pope and have arranged for a meeting to discuss efforts to crack down on perceived doctrinal infidelity by the sisters. With reports that Cardinals were paying off pedophiles to leave the priesthood and go abuse kids somewhere else, maybe the nuns feel like they have the upper hand here.

A New York appellate court ruled that wrongly calling someone gay is of itself no longer considered slanderous.

Now would be a good time to remind you all that a Mitt Romney presidency would effectively mean a hostile takeover of the federal judiciary.

With all the attention last week on the Prenatal Nondiscrimination Act (PRENDA) one Republican lawmaker comes clean and admits the bill is part of a larger effort to simply criminalize abortion.

Part of that effort includes selectively using, or ignoring all together, widely accepted medical research.

After taking on Planned Parenthood in one of the most self-destructive acts of political ax-grinding, participation in the Susan G. Komen charity races is at a new low.

If Super PAC spending drives political discourse and significantly control our elections then, for the time being, women need to spend a lot more money in politics.

Former Michigan governor Jennifer Granholm is mad as hell and thinks you should be too.

Senior Advisor and Assistant to President Obama Valerie Jarrett makes the case for prioritizing low-income families as one way of creating opportunity for every American.

Student debt load is at nearly $905 billion in this country and threatens to be the next big economic bubble to burst.

Silicon Valley is supposed to be progressive and forward-thinking, not another hotbed of sexual harassment.

A new show gives a close-up look of the lives of women in wheelchairs.

Here are more summer reading recommendations, this time 5 great fantasy books that break the mold. Enjoy!

Thanks for checking back and don’t forget to send in your stories, suggestions and comments. We’ll be back each weekday with the latest in the best and the worst from the War on Women. So long as the battle rages, we’ll cover the latest, so please check back!

Read more: , , ,

Photo from jemimus via flickr.

have you shared this story yet?

some of the best people we know are doing it

318 comments

+ add your own
4:28PM PDT on Aug 27, 2012

we ARE allowing the religious right to make unrealistic and dangerous demands. if they want a voice in government, they need top pay taxes and petition like the rest of us. They have no greater voice than us. And why should Christianity take precedent anyway? It doesn't. Period. Sadly we are having to fight this with all we have

2:22PM PDT on Aug 27, 2012

American Taliban are the ultra Right Wing Neo-Con fundamentalists who preach violence against women and the poor in the name of God. The American Taliban hold a belief they are the chosen ones who can make judgement on the working poor, the disenfranchised, with a myth of their inherent god given right to punish the powerless in society. They would be the first ones screaming for the crucifiction of Jesus on the cross. Religion like with the Islamic Taliban is essential tool to justify their evil deeds

11:48AM PDT on Jul 1, 2012

The T-Party , the NEO_CON fundamentalists, the ultra-right wing pseudo-Christain psychpaths are all American Taliban

11:48AM PDT on Jul 1, 2012

The T-Party , the NEO_CON fundamentalists, the ultra-right wing pseudo-Christain psychpaths are all American Taliban

12:52PM PDT on Jun 11, 2012

@ JH M. since when were the NAZIs humanists? They were in a sense, theocratic supremacists, totally lacking in humanism. Those that followed the NAZIs are the same type of "sheep"who follow the TEAparty, totally ignorant of the fact the there leaders are screwing them.

8:03AM PDT on Jun 11, 2012

Your crass comment about Marx suggests to me that you little acquaintance with his writing on the subject. This is a pity, because in fact his contributions are very astute and subtle. My own feeling in regard to this whole question of ethics is that only when a truly human society arises, one based on satisfying human needs rather than specious ‘demands’, a society in which all goods and services will be freely available (see http://andycox1953.webs.com/), that a truly humanist ethic will establish itself

8:02AM PDT on Jun 11, 2012

JH, I think you’re somewhat confused about humanism. It’s not about ethical relativism; the proposition that one ethical view is as good as another as there can never be an objective yardstick by which to judge the merits of either. Rather, it’s the assertion that ethics are man-made and sustained by human beings, and should focus on what is good for us collectively as a species. Hence, it’s most decidedly not about legitimising egotistic perspectives. The Christian exhortation to ‘do unto other others as you would have done unto you’ sits easily with humanism. Humanism is about consensus, not capricious takes on how one might personally live. Religious apologists, say humanists, are deluding themselves in attributing ethics to some divine source, when really, the source is human. In any case, to assume, as perhaps you do, JH, that God is the font of ethics is to beg one huge question about the very existence of God in the first place. Stripped of any philosophical justification in the form of a proven god, one would have to account for the existence of the orthodox morality as promulgated by established religions. And it is here that question of the role of religion in society surfaces; a question that Marx addressed.

7:47AM PDT on Jun 11, 2012

JH, I think you’re somewhat confused about humanism. It’s not about ethical relativism; the proposition that one ethical view is as good as another as there can never be an objective yardstick by which to judge the merits of either. Rather, it’s the assertion that ethics are man-made and sustained by human beings, and should focus on what is good for us collectively as a species. Hence, it’s most decidedly not about legitimising egotistic perspectives. The Christian exhortation to ‘do unto other others as you would have done unto you’ sits easily with humanism. Humanism is about consensus, not capricious takes on how one might personally live. Religious apologists, say humanists, are deluding themselves in attributing ethics to some divine source, when really, the source is human. In any case, to assume, as perhaps you do, JH, that God is the font of ethics is to beg one huge question about the very existence of God in the first place. Stripped of any philosophical justification in the form of a proven god, one would have to account for the existence of the orthodox morality as promulgated by established religions. And it is here that question of the role of religion in society surfaces; a question that Marx addressed.

7:46AM PDT on Jun 11, 2012

JH, I think you’re somewhat confused about humanism. It’s not about ethical relativism; the proposition that one ethical view is as good as another as there can never be an objective yardstick by which to judge the merits of either. Rather, it’s the assertion that ethics are man-made and sustained by human beings, and should focus on what is good for us collectively as a species. Hence, it’s most decidedly not about legitimising egotistic perspectives. The Christian exhortation to ‘do unto other others as you would have done unto you’ sits easily with humanism. Humanism is about consensus, not capricious takes on how one might personally live. Religious apologists, say humanists, are deluding themselves in attributing ethics to some divine source, when really, the source is human. In any case, to assume, as perhaps you do, JH, that God is the font of ethics is to beg one huge question about the very existence of God in the first place. Stripped of any philosophical justification in the form of a proven god, one would have to account for the existence of the orthodox morality as promulgated by established religions. And it is here that question of the role of religion in society surfaces; a question that Marx addressed.

7:46AM PDT on Jun 11, 2012

JH, I think you’re somewhat confused about humanism. It’s not about ethical relativism; the proposition that one ethical view is as good as another as there can never be an objective yardstick by which to judge the merits of either. Rather, it’s the assertion that ethics are man-made and sustained by human beings, and should focus on what is good for us collectively as a species. Hence, it’s most decidedly not about legitimising egotistic perspectives. The Christian exhortation to ‘do unto other others as you would have done unto you’ sits easily with humanism. Humanism is about consensus, not capricious takes on how one might personally live. Religious apologists, say humanists, are deluding themselves in attributing ethics to some divine source, when really, the source is human. In any case, to assume, as perhaps you do, JH, that God is the font of ethics is to beg one huge question about the very existence of God in the first place. Stripped of any philosophical justification in the form of a proven god, one would have to account for the existence of the orthodox morality as promulgated by established religions. And it is here that question of the role of religion in society surfaces; a question that Marx addressed.

add your comment



Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of
Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

ads keep care2 free
Story idea? Want to blog? Contact the editors!
ads keep care2 free

more from causes




Select names from your address book   |   Help
   

We hate spam. We do not sell or share the email addresses you provide.