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Feral Cats Slaughtered To Save Endangered Birds

Feral Cats Slaughtered To Save Endangered Birds

Good news: The frigatebird, one of the world’ rarest seabirds, has returned to remote Ascension Island in the south Atlantic Ocean after 150 years. At the start of December, ornithologists sighted frigatebirds guarding two nests with eggs, the first signs that the species has bred on the island since Charles Darwin visited in 1836. Since then, a small colony of about 10,000 birds has survived on Boatswain Bird Island, a rocky outcrop that has left them easily exposed to disease and oil spills.

But here’s the bad news. The island’s entire population of feral cats has been killed, in a program costing more than more than £500,000 under the auspices of the Royal Society for the Preservation of Birds (RSPB) and the British Foreign Office.

The cats were only there because of humans. In the 19th century, Ascension Island had a population of more than 20 million seabirds. The frigatebird was thought particularly important as it was only found on the island; the males of the species have a distinctive red sac on their chests that is inflated during courtship. With humans came other unintentional settlers — rats — who began to kill off the birds’ chicks. Cats were accordingly imported but they too started to kill the chicks so that, when Darwin arrived on the island, only a few frigatebirds remained and these were also soon killed after he left. Boatswain Bird Island where the last colony of birds lived was inaccessible to cats.

Starting in December of 2006, the RSPB started its program to kill the wild cats. Islanders who had pet cats were instructed to collar and microchip them. Traps were set for the feral cats who were put down after being caught.

It’s thrilling to learn that a species has been brought back from the very edge of extinction. But the fate of the cats, who were of course not on Ascension Island by any of their own doing, is at least questionable. Could not the cats, once trapped, have been transported to an off-island shelter and put up for adoption?

On another island in the south Atlantic, South Georgia (2000 miles off the southern tip of Argentina), scientists are hoping to eradicate the population of rats. Their plan, part of the Habitat Restoration Project, involves not bringing in cats but scattering rat poison (dropped from three helicopters) over the island. Species endemic to South Georgia, such as the South Georgia Pipit, have retreated to offshore inlets and island that are rodent-free, but this is likely to change. Due to global warming, two glacial barriers are disappearing and the fear is that additional species of ground-nesting birds — including storm petrels, prions, diving petrels and blue petrels, who have all but abandoned the main island — will be threatened by the rats.

Conservationists acknowledge that at least some birds are likely to perish by consuming the rat poison. But such “collateral damage” is inevitable, the German news magazine, Der Spiegel notes.

In other words, as in the case of the killing of feral cats to bring back the frigatebird population, innocent animals are perishing as humans seek to undo the damage they caused. If anyone needs a lesson in how humans wreak havoc on wildlife and then create more in attempting to undo the damage, the cases of Ascension Island’s frigatebirds and the feral cats, and of the animal life on South Georgia, provide plenty to learn from.

 

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12:40AM PST on Feb 5, 2014

Past member, you probably won't see this but you've got your priorities wrong! The cats are merely the way in which humanity is wrecking this particular ecosystem. In this case there is no real alternative to a pain-free death with minimum stress.

So you'd sooner cuddle a cat than a frigate bird! It's a great pity that we put more emphasis on cute cuddly animals. When we stop caring about what damage our activities are causing, even greater damage follows, in this case extinction of a species that has every right to exist in its natural home!

People not caring for some other reason is how dangers to this planet get out of hand. Trying to correct that is the fundamental motivation behind Care2! Possibly that's why you are a past member!

(gets off soapbox)

11:21AM PDT on Aug 25, 2013

Is Azle B a troll? If he actually read the first line: 'The frigatebird, one of the world’ rarest seabirds,' he must either be trying to wind up orthithologists or plain ignorant...! .

11:18AM PDT on Aug 25, 2013

Colleen, I don't know if you are still reading this thread.

I do realise you wanted to save all the cats, but how? I've explained that neutering, then releasing on the island, would still endanger the birds who were there first, and so are the island's rightful inhabitants. I guess you would have to built an outsize cage: a kind of 'cat aviary' and let them loose in there. And then people would complain about that!

There isn't a perfect solution, and the remarks about the Nazis are totally irrelevant.

4:58AM PST on Jan 25, 2013

Though it's not a natural way for the sake of the disappearing birds

10:16AM PST on Jan 24, 2013

Screw the humans save the cats AND birds

7:27AM PST on Jan 24, 2013

It always comes down to mankinds ignorance. Who brought these cats there,it was man. So why must these abandoned cats pay for man's stupidity??? So now man murders all these abandoned cats to save the birds. When can we start culling humans????

7:53AM PST on Jan 7, 2013

Well done! Some of the best news I've heard so far for 2012.
Screw the feral cats, we need the birds.

11:48AM PST on Dec 29, 2012

Screw the birds, save the cats. >^..^

11:43AM PST on Dec 29, 2012

:(

1:18PM PST on Dec 27, 2012

Sad!

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