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Gecko Saves Friend from Snake (VIDEO)

Gecko Saves Friend from Snake (VIDEO)

Hereís something you donít see every day!† A gecko in Thailand comes to the rescue of another gecko who is being attacked by a snake.

There are five sub-families of geckos with numerous species among them.† The geckosí toes have the ability to adhere to most surfaces without liquids or surface tension.† Thatís why they walk on walls and ceilings.

Found mostly in warm climates, some species of gecko coexist with humans inside their homes and are referred to as House Geckos.† Eating insects make them the perfect roommate in tropical climes.

It may have taken this brave fellow a little time to come to the assistance of his buddy, but look how he appears to be planning the best method of attack.† That is one very determined gecko!

 

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Photo of gecko foot by Kaptain Kobold via Flickr

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147 comments

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2:21AM PDT on Apr 6, 2013

I can't decide who began tht fight.Interesting video.Thank you.

10:18AM PDT on Aug 13, 2012

Ah yes, only Asians (Thais), could laugh as the life and death struggle goes on!! They do not have a heart or any positive feelings for animals of any kind! I have seen the thousands of poor dogs mistreated, as they roam the streets of Bancock! Elephants, tortured with sharp sticks, and it goes on and on!!!

5:29AM PDT on Aug 11, 2012

wow

3:54AM PDT on May 6, 2012

We can`t be partisan in this. The serpent looks like a Thai Cat Snake (Boiga cyanea), and as others have pointed out, they have to eat too. They are regarded as harmless to Humans due to their mild venom and being only rear fanged snakes. That said, the venom would be effective to lizards, and this gecko is exhibiting a great deal of courage in trying to rescue his companion. At one point it looks as though he is communicating some understanding between himself and his friend as they engage visual contact. No matter what communication takes place between them, this is an incredible example of altruistic behaviour in the animal kingdom.

Before some of you condemn snakes outright, it should be remembered that there are many non-venomous snakes out there who literally eat venomous ones for breakfast.

A fascinating piece of footage, the sort of thing that Natural History film makers would wait months to film, thanks for posting.

3:53AM PDT on May 6, 2012

We can`t be partisan in this. The serpent looks like a Thai Cat Snake (Boiga cyanea), and as others have pointed out, they have to eat too. They are regarded as harmless to Humans due to their mild venom and being only rear fanged snakes. That said, the venom would be effective to lizards, and this gecko is exhibiting a great deal of courage in trying to rescue his companion. At one point it looks as though he is communicating some understanding between himself and his friend as they engage visual contact. No matter what communication takes place between them, this is an incredible example of altruistic behaviour in the animal kingdom.

Before some of you condemn snakes outright, it should be remembered that there are many non-venomous snakes out there who literally eat venomous ones for breakfast.

A fascinating piece of footage, the sort of thing that Natural History film makers would wait months to film, thanks for posting.

3:51AM PDT on May 6, 2012

We can`t be partisan in this. The serpent looks like a Thai Cat Snake (Boiga cyanea), and as others have pointed out, they have to eat too. They are regarded as harmless to Humans due to their mild venom and being only rear fanged snakes. That said, the venom would be effective to lizards, and this gecko is exhibiting a great deal of courage in trying to rescue his companion. At one point it looks as though he is communicating some understanding between himself and his friend as they engage visual contact. No matter what communication takes place between them, this is an incredible example of altruistic behaviour in the animal kingdom.

Before some of you condemn snakes outright, it should be remembered that there are many non-venomous snakes out there who literally eat venomous ones for breakfast.

A fascinating piece of footage, the sort of thing that Natural History film makers would wait months to film, thanks for posting.

3:50AM PDT on May 6, 2012

We can`t be partisan in this. The serpent looks like a Thai Cat Snake (Boiga cyanea), and as others have pointed out, they have to eat too. They are regarded as harmless to Humans due to their mild venom and being only rear fanged snakes. That said, the venom would be effective to lizards, and this gecko is exhibiting a great deal of courage in trying to rescue his companion. At one point it looks as though he is communicating some understanding between himself and his friend as they engage visual contact. No matter what communication takes place between them, this is an incredible example of altruistic behaviour in the animal kingdom.

Before some of you condemn snakes outright, it should be remembered that there are many non-venomous snakes out there who literally eat venomous ones for breakfast.

A fascinating piece of footage, the sort of thing that Natural History film makers would wait months to film, thanks for posting.

3:47AM PDT on May 6, 2012

We can`t be partisan in this. The serpent looks like a Thai Cat Snake (Boiga cyanea), and as others have pointed out, they have to eat too. They are regarded as harmless to Humans due to their mild venom and being only rear fanged snakes. That said, the venom would be effective to lizards, and this gecko is exhibiting a great deal of courage in trying to rescue his companion. At one point it looks as though he is communicating some understanding between himself and his friend as they engage visual contact. No matter what communication takes place between them, this is an incredible example of altruistic behaviour in the animal kingdom.

Before some of you condemn snakes outright, it should be remembered that there are many non-venomous snakes out there who literally eat venomous ones for breakfast.

A fascinating piece of footage, the sort of thing that Natural History film makers would wait months to film, thanks for posting.

1:05PM PST on Jan 6, 2012

What a waste of 2 minutes..

9:45AM PST on Jan 6, 2012

I agree with SeattleAnn. I think this gecko tried to eat the snake and the snake fought back.

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