Genetically Modified Camel Milk Could Help Produce Pharmaceuticals

Written by Mat McDermott

Pretty crazy stuff here (on a number of levels) and it well may be a good ways off from moving out of development: SciDec.net reports that researchers in Dubai are working on developing genetically modified camels, the milk from which would produce pharmaceutical proteins which could then be processed into cheaper-priced drugs (insulin, clotting factors for treating hemophilia are mentioned) than are currently available in the region.

The first genetically modified camel embryos are hoped to implanted in surrogate mothers later this year, though less than 5% of the cloned transgenic embryos are expected to make it to birth.

Why camels? Cows would be a better option from the standpoint of milk production, but camels have been chosen for this research as they are better suited for the arid environment of the United Arab Emirates and surrounding nations.

OK…

Cheaper priced drugs for treating potentially life-threatening diseases, really good.

Genetically modifying other species, without even a hint of consent and in a situation that surely benefits humans far far more than the camels, really not so good. It’s an exploitative situation and simple, well beyond simply raising camels for milk, especially when you consider the rate of success for giving birth.

This post was originally published by TreeHugger.

 

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Photo: patries71/flickr

106 comments

Fred Hoekstra
Fred Hoekstra3 years ago

Thank you TreeHugger, for Sharing this!

Wendy Kobylarz

Jesus, I am sick. What will we NOT do to animals, and why is it permissible? We are clearly the cruelest, greediest, least-evolved species on the planet.

Colleen Prinssen
Colleen Prinssen3 years ago

how easy is it to cure them of their Camel use? It is the right thing no?

jackie w.
jackie w.3 years ago

John W : Humans (seldom?) volunteer to be used so why should non-human aimals (sic) be okay about it if they understood?

John W.
John W.3 years ago

Oops, wrong quote.

Heather M

"Also animals that are cloned I understand are infertile "

Did you read the article, rather than the alarmist and ridiculous "quick poll" question?

No aimals are being "cloned", ffs. I shudder at what the educational system in the West - and especially the US - is producing.

John W.
John W.3 years ago

Heather M

"They (the camels etc) certainly wouldn't consent "

Did you read the article, rather than the alarmist and ridiculous "quick poll" question?

No aimals are being "cloned", ffs. I shudder at what the educational system in the West - and especially the US - is producing.

John W.
John W.3 years ago

Jackie W

"They (the camels etc) certainly wouldn't consent "

How could you possibly know? Perhaps they would be altruistic.

jackie w.
jackie w.3 years ago

correction : They (the camels etc) certainly wouldn't consent if they could express themselves.

jackie w.
jackie w.3 years ago

Marilyn L : "without even a hint of consent". I think it is pretty obvious, Marilyn, what is meant here (to most people, anyway). Of course the camels (and all the other unfortunate animals) can't 'consent' in human terms, but they certainly would if they could.

jackie w.
jackie w.3 years ago

The 'bright' ideas just never stop coming forward. And what will happen to the calves -
or do I really need to ask?