Global Oil Consumption in 2010 up to “All-Time” High

Global oil consumption increased last year to 87.4 million barrels of oil a day, according to a Worldwatch report. The report calls the increase an “all-time high.”  One-third of the increase is from China, which uses over 10 percent of the world’s oil. U.S., Brazil, Russia and the Middle East accounted for 48 percent of the increase. Consumption in the EU actually decreased for the fourth consecutive year.  From 2008 to 2009, oil consumption decreased 1.5 percent due to the recession.

Oil remained the biggest source of primary energy use globally in 2010. However, its share of primary energy use decreased for the 11th consecutive year -this time to 37 percent. The gap in oil consumption between countries in the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and non-OECD countries narrowed. OECD countries represented 52.5 percent of total oil consumption, and non-OECD represented 47.4 percent.

Oil Sands Cost Plenty to Harvest

The report pointed out that although oil sands “represent huge resources” their “relatively high production and environmental costs will likely prove to be important limiting factors on production.” Oil sands in Alberta, Canada accounted for an extra 143 billion barrels of proved reserves last year, equal to slightly more than Europe and Eurasia’s reserves combined. Alberta’s oil sands now contribute to about half of Canada’s crude oil production and are expected to continue to provide more.

“Between the recession, the BP oil spill, and instability in the Middle East and North Africa, oil markets have been on a roller coaster the last few years,” said Worldwatch Sustainable Energy Fellow Saya Kitasei, who co-authored the report along with Worldwatch researcher Natalie Narotzky.

“When the dust settles, however, it is clear that the momentum of future market growth has moved to the developing world, where oil consumption did not miss a beat during the recession and shows no sign of slowing,” Kitasei added.

37 comments

Vasanthkumar Mysoremath

@ Patrick, if you want to know what is walking, ask all those Oil Policy Making FATSOs to find out what is below their belly. If they cant find anything, ask them to reduce and find out or else hold a mirror down there.

Peter Weinelt
Pete Weinelt4 years ago

Sorry for the duplicate. [after pressing the add comment button the site asked for my password. After entering it, the add comment part came back up, but empty, and my comment didn't appear. Did it again, pressed add comment, and they both came up - AGGGGH!]
Anyway one more - buying local and/or organic foods also reduces fossil fuel use. [and you get better quality food]

Peter Weinelt
Pete Weinelt4 years ago

Jane, it currently takes 10 units [or calories] of fossil fuel to produce one calorie of food [corn, wheat, soy beans, oats, etc.]. It then takes 10 -12 lbs of grain to produce one pound of meat.
So do the math [100 calories of fossil fuel for one calorie of meat?!]. The average person in China, over the last 20-25 years has increased their meat consumption from 10% of their diet to 25% of their diet. Again with 1.35 billion people - do the math. Reducing your animal foods consumption greatly reduces fossil fuel use. As Brianna stated a reusable water bottle, like stainless steel, over it's life, saves a lot of fossil fuel that would have been used to make the plastic bottles the s.s. bottle replaced. Another idea is to plug your TV, DVD, computer, printer, monitor, etc. into a surge protecter that you can easily turn off when not using those items. [when sleeping, out of the house, etc.]. 50 to 60 % of electricity comes from burning coal - nasty and toxic stuff.

Peter Weinelt
Pete Weinelt4 years ago

Jane, it currently takes 10 units [or calories] of fossil fuel to produce one calorie of food [corn, wheat, soy beans, oats, etc.]. It then takes 10 -12 lbs of grain to produce one pound of meat.
So do the math [100 calories of fossil fuel for one calorie of meat?!]. The average person in China, over the last 20-25 years has increased their meat consumption from 10% of their diet to 25% of their diet. Again with 1.35 billion people - do the math. Reducing your animal foods consumption greatly reduces fossil fuel use. As Brianna stated a reusable water bottle, like stainless steel, over it's life, saves a lot of fossil fuel that would have been used to make the plastic bottles the s.s. bottle replaced. Another idea is to plug your TV, DVD, computer, printer, monitor, etc. into a surge protecter that you can easily turn off when not using those items. [when sleeping, out of the house, etc.]. 50 to 60 % of electricity comes from burning coal - nasty and toxic stuff.

Brianna K.
Past Member 4 years ago

Jane, check into how much oil is used in the plastic and meat industry for a start. Find out what you are using that depends on the oil industry and ask yourself if there is a way to decrease how often you use it or if there is an alternative.
Have a beautiful day :)

Jane Warren
Jane Warren4 years ago

thnx for this.
What are other ways to lower consumption - that have not been tried?

Brianna K.
Past Member 4 years ago

There are so many ways we can lower our oil consumption; we just need to educate ourselves.

Clare E.
Clare Canfield4 years ago

Hmm, odd, I've seen far more energy efficient cars for sale and on the road in Florida. Then again, I know these vehicles are not adequate for mountainous terrain, but you'd think the flatlands would offset that. Weird, I'm curious if there are more studies.

Patrick F.
Patrick f.4 years ago

WALKING? What the hell is WALKING? Wheeeeze, hufff pufff

Gayle J.
Gayle, J.4 years ago

What is wrong with the human race? We just can't give up our precious oil with all its environmental destruction and pollution. Guess we get what we deserve - an extra hot planet with extreme climate change. Hang on to your seats, it's going to be bumpy, sweltering ride.