Goat Cheese Farmers Give it All Up to Make Vegan Cheese Instead

After 20 years as award winning goat cheese farmers, Carol and Julian Pearce have decided to give it all up and make vegan cheese instead.

Still in the transition phase from farm to sanctuary, these two compassionate farmers decided that there was simply no way they could continue to justify bringing more life into the world while there were so many being mistreated and murdered, and in desperate need of a new home.

The No Kill Goat Cheese Farm

Having always identified themselves as being animal lovers and compassionate carers, their goat cheese business was a ‘no kill’ farm, where the animals were not slaughtered after their production days were over, but instead would live out the rest of their natural life on the farm.

As well as the no kill farm, the couple had already been taking in abused and abandoned goats, pigs, cows, horses, chickens, ducks and dogs for many years, and this is what ultimately led to the decision to halt their profitable farm business, in order to pursue an altogether more ethical cheese making venture.

Although many people are under the impression that small scale farming is not cruel or inhumane, this story highlights the fact that even a ‘no kill’ farm is not without its ethical problems. Apart from the fact that the animals are still being exploited for their milk (which was only ever intended to be drunk by their own kids), the farm is bringing more and more animals into the world in order to create that milk.

As hard as any farmer may try to care for their animals, the industry is inherently flawed from a moral standpoint as the animals are always being treated as commodities, with their bodies being exploited for our own gain. The Pearce’s statement about their decision to turn their farm vegan echoed this point by saying, “We did the best we could for our animals while still producing cheese, but then we realized ~ a vegan farm will allow us to do even better.”

The Animal Friendly Cheese

These two resourceful farmers are converting their 20 years of goat cheese making experience into vegan cheese making, in an effort to adapt and utilize their skills and find additional funding for their new 501(c)(3) non-profit rescue organization, The Sanctuary at Soledad Goats.

With the tagline “our cheese rescues animals,” the couple is hoping that their newfound love for vegan cheese making will help to spread the message about cruelty free cheese and help them to rescue more animals from the exploitation of the farm industry at the same time.

A Model for All Farms to Follow

Skeptics of change always come up with reasons why things have to remain the way they are, even when the current system of farming is leading to the exploitation, confinement, suffering and death of billions of animals every year.

As Grace Hopper said, “The most dangerous phrase in the language is ‘we’ve always done it this way.”

Stories like this one offer hope and provide proof that it is indeed possible for us to change our ways and to find more compassionate alternatives. There are many options for animal farmers wishing to give up their current exploitative practices in favor of kinder ones, whether it’s switching from goat cheese to vegan cheese, or from pig farming to vegetable farming, we can create a better future for animals.

Photo Credit: The Sanctuary at Soledad Goats


Jeanne Rogers
Jeanne Rogers23 days ago

Thank you for sharing.

Mark Donner
Mark Donner7 months ago

I'm tired of low IQ humans excusing their crimes by gibbering about "circles" ... An excuse called "circle of life" to have mass murdering concentration camps of horrors for the rotten stomachs of moronic overpopulated humans. My advice to those dumb vicious human mutated apes is go jump off a cliff and kill yourselves to contribute to your precious circles, then you won't sound like hypocritical criminals.

Mark Donner
Mark Donner7 months ago

If male goat kids are killed then goat milk is not a no cruelty option.

Siyus Copetallus
Siyus Copetallus10 months ago

Thank you for sharing.

Tammy D.
Tammy D.about a year ago

I agree with Beryl's comment. Article should add some info for people who might be interested in more details and explanation. I would also like to know what problems the couple has run into, community opinion and what they plan to make their products from.

To Nikki's comments, you do have a point. However, milk does not imply dairy, as it has long been used for coconut and other vegetal products. Tofu is really a soya curd product, so .... it could technically qualify as a 'cheese'. One need look no further than 'butter' to find some holes in your argument. If cocoa butter is not a real thing, I see no point in living! I do agree that vegetable products should move away from considering themselves substitutes. The problem is that they are actually being marketed to people who are not yet converted to a vegetarian diet. While you and I might not agree with the labelling, a lot of consumers out there are trying out these products because of the use of these substitute names. I know lots of omnivorous people who eat veggie 'ribs', 'burgers' and 'dogs'. If they were called 'tofu logs' or something, they might not be as popular....

Yolanda Aguilar
Yolanda Aguilarabout a year ago

Carol and Julian Pearce, you are heroes !!! You are making a difference.

Julia Cabrera-Woscek
Julia Cabrera-Woscekabout a year ago

Cheese is from animals body fluids. If its not from animal's body fluid then call it something else.

Nikki Davey
Nikki Daveyabout a year ago

Why do vegans and vegetarians "need" to eat copy versions of everyday omnivorous food? For example vegetarian sausages and bacon, and "Quorn" meat substitutes.
If you're giving up eating animal products then do so.

Nikki Davey
Nikki Daveyabout a year ago

Could call it vegan cheese substitute or something similar.

Nikki Davey
Nikki Daveyabout a year ago

The term vegan cheese is an oxymoron. Cheese is made by fermenting milk. Vegans do not consume any animal product including milk. Therefore there can be no such product as "vegan cheese".