How a Rescued Dairy Cow Remembered That Her Babies Were Stolen

This is the story of Clarabelle, a rescued cow who spent part of her life on a dairy farm where she was exposed to cruelty and abuse. Her biggest trauma occurred when her calves were taken from her right after they were born. She now fortunately lives at Edgar’s Mission, an animal sanctuary located in Australia.

Clarabelle arrived at the farm sanctuary when she was pregnant again. More than likely traumatized by past events, this rescued dairy cow gave birth to her calf in secret while also hiding her baby. With such an incredible attempt to protect her calf from the harm of human hands, Clarabelle tucked away her young one in a different hiding spot each day. One of the hiding places was in a field of tall grass; it took sanctuary workers a long time to locate the hidden calf.

Clarabelle’s actions display many things, if you think about it. For one, she loves and safeguards her baby, the same way humans do. She remembered the heartbreaking experience of having her calves ripped away from her following birth and did whatever was in her power to keep her newborn safe – the same thing that any other loving mother would do.

We’ve see in Clarabelle’s case and in many other cases that animals can feel and even strategize, so why do we continue to allow this suffering to take place?

There is a very emotional side to the dairy and veal industry that many people are unaware of. I previously posted about the dairy industry’s latest misleading campaign and shared a video link within it. The clip is of a group of dairy cows guarding a newborn calf for its mother, since she was too weak to shield the baby herself. They were trying to halt the farmer from taking that new baby calf away from its mother. The dairy farm worker laughed it off and took the calf away anyhow. The baby was likely shipped off to a slaughter facility, where it spent the short time on this earth, probably crying for its mother, absolutely crammed into a tight wooden crate in order to ensure its meat is succulent enough for the patrons who eat it.

Does this enrage you? Are you sick to your stomach thinking about this cruelty and lack of moral decency that humans are showing towards living and feeling beings? I bet you think this is just so wrong. The obvious choice would be to boycott the dairy industry. If everyone did that today, and replaced their dairy products with non-dairy foods, the cruelty would very quickly become non-existent. Will people do that? Probably not.

So what can we do for a Plan B? I suggest that just like the banning of the brutal foie gras industry in many regions across the globe, that veal products also be banned as well. The reason why I say that is because both practices are extremely cruel and hurtful. If bans were put on veal, I would also like to see a waiting period given to each mother dairy cow, that allows a length of time to be allotted to her and her calf that permits nursing, bonding, and a more natural way of her gradually separating from her offspring. Ultimately, it would be a dream come true to see an end to all of this madness of hurting animals when we have other food alternatives that are comparable, if not, better than animal products.

However, until that day comes where eating animals and using their bodily liquids is thought of as just a barbaric thing of the past, we have an obligation to at least make the lives of animals raised for food, more tolerable and a little less agonizing than it currently is.

These animals feel, they understand, and they remember. Clarabelle, and other animals that experience this type of life, become broken in a way. Cows are social animals, the same as humans, and have family that they care about. These animals deserve protection and rights as well, and the first step is to cease support of such a vicious, family-disintegrating industry.

Photo Credit: Thinkstock

300 comments

Jerome S
Jerome S3 months ago

thanks

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Jerome S
Jerome S3 months ago

thanks

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Jim V
Jim Ven3 months ago

thanks for sharing.

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Jim V
Jim Ven3 months ago

thanks for sharing.

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Elaine W.
Elaine Wabout a year ago

A very touching story.

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Ruth S.
Ruth Sabout a year ago

Thanks.

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JoAnn Paris
JoAnn Parisabout a year ago

Sharing article.

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Hent catalina - maria
Hent catalina - mariaabout a year ago

thanks

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Hent catalina - maria
Hent catalina - mariaabout a year ago

tyfs

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Bill Eagle
Bill Eabout a year ago

Cows have great memories.

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