How to Talk to An Ostrich (Video)

Scientist Richard Alley is the guy behind “Earth the Operators Manual” on PBS, and he’s one of the best communicators on climate science around.

Alley has followed his PBS show up with a new series of short Youtube videos intended to supply social media with something you can share and link to. It’s for those you know with their heads in the sand (like my dad) — so of course it is called “How to Talk to An Ostrich.”

They’re all here, but here are a couple of samples.

Alley describes how 19th Century Americans burned through forests and then moved on to hunt all the nearby whales close to extinction — “we burned the whales to light the evenings!” What happens if we burn through all the coal and oil, and — especially — America’s new fuel: shale gas?

You say: “Earth’s Climate Changes Gradually… We Can Easily Adapt.” Alley says: “Maybe, maybe not… because sometimes climate goes over the edge, and quickly. Perhaps we’d better take out some insurance.”

Go share.

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Picture by Silvain de Munck

54 comments

sheri denato
Past Member 4 years ago

thanks for article

Cheryl B.
Cheryl B.4 years ago

thanks

Cheryl B.
Cheryl B.4 years ago

thanks

Angela N.
Angela N.4 years ago

thank you =]

Rosie Lopez
Rosie Lopez4 years ago

thnx :-)

Roger Monk
Past Member 4 years ago

Very, very politely.

Roger Monk
Past Member 4 years ago

Very, very politely.

Elaine A.
Elaine Al Meqdad4 years ago

Well, if you can't carry a good conversation, then to save face you can always bury your head in the sand as well!

Grace Adams
Grace Adams4 years ago

We need to get going on carbon capture and storage using Global Thermostat for capture and Enhanced Geothermal Systems stuffed with CO2 as their hydraulic fluid for storage AND we need some delaying tactics on fossil fuel burning.Carbon Capture and storage is going to be expensive--especially if we don't have much time to catch up to the 35 billion metric tons of CO2 emitted into the air in 2011 and likely to be repeated if not increased every year until we manage to do something about it.

sheri denato
Past Member 4 years ago

thanks