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Man Eats Food Only Advertised on TV, Becomes Hormonal

Man Eats Food Only Advertised on TV, Becomes Hormonal

 

Written by Colleen Vanderlinden

Sit through any prime-time television show, televised sporting event, or even cartoon and you’re sure to see plenty of commercials for food. And you’ve undoubtedly noticed that this food runs the gamut from fast food pizza and burgers, to snack foods, to sugary breakfast fare. They are really “edible food-like substances,” as Michael Pollan would say.

What would a month of living solely on these TV commercial foods look like? And how would you feel at the end of it?

Tom Lamont, a writer for The Observer, decided to give it a try. For one month, he could only purchase and eat those foods he’d seen advertised on television. As we all well know, this means processed, sugary, salty, fatty food. They don’t advertise Brussels sprouts on television. No bulk whole grains. No pastured meat. Only those products that have a large advertising budget behind them.

Here are a few quotes from Lamont’s article, in which he details the experiment:

The pizza was a tactical move. Some 60 hours in I’d noted first signs of slowing down mentally afternoons harder to work through, getting out of bed more of an undertaking. I’d decided the greasy stuff-in-a-bun was to blame, and that pizzas would be better. After all, weren’t those pureed tomatoes atop each slice? Real mushrooms and greens?

Upon which, he learns that pizza was possibly the worst choice he could have made.

By the time I got to Octomom I was starting to wonder what Aptamil “follow-on milk” might taste like.

At the end of a particularly bleak day my girlfriend saw fit to stage an intervention, ambushing me with a rule-breaking plate of salmon and beans for dinner. Was I imagining it, in the aftermath of the meal, when I immediately started to feel better? “No, no,” Briffa assured me, “these things can be incredibly immediate. It’s a bit like stopping smacking yourself in the face with a polo mallet. Immediately there’s relief.”

Basically, by the time the month was up, Lamont felt like a sluggish, cranky mess. Surprisingly, he didn’t gain any weight, but that could be at least partially because he got so tired of processed foods that he just didn’t eat as much after a while.

This is why those of us who are trying to eat better are often advised to shop the “perimeter” of the grocery store. The dairy, produce, meat, and bulk grain bins are often in the outer aisles. The inner aisles, and those attention-grabbing end caps, are the domain of processed food.

Moral of the story: shop the perimeter, grow a garden, and if something is advertised on TV, it’s probably not all that good for you!

This post was originally published by TreeHugger.

 

Related Stories:

Forget Cereal – Feed Your Kids Twinkies

How Has the Recession Changed What We Buy?

Should You Be Worried About McDonald’s Giving You Cancer?

 

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Photo from Old Shoe Woman via flickr

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129 comments

+ add your own
12:40AM PST on Dec 3, 2012

Very revealing.

6:37PM PST on Dec 1, 2012

Interesting.

6:47AM PDT on Aug 25, 2012

Nessuna sorpresa.

5:18AM PDT on Aug 23, 2012

Thanks for the article.

5:26PM PDT on Mar 30, 2012

Good information. One can only eat so much of the advertised junk before they want to go sit in a corner and say "Leave me alone."

8:28AM PDT on Mar 26, 2012

Noted. It reminds me of this old movie... Soylent Green, a mst watch!

7:39AM PDT on Mar 25, 2012

This should have been a documentary...Not just "Supersize Me", but "Supersell Me" It would work...Of course I don't want him to abuse his health again....

5:18PM PDT on Mar 23, 2012

thanks

2:44AM PDT on Mar 20, 2012

For many years, my common answer in shops (no matter what range) is: "No, thank you, I don't want it, it was advertised on TV." :-)

5:33PM PDT on Mar 19, 2012

Thanks for the article.

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