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Minnesota Called to Apologize to Native Americans (Video)

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The beginning of part two focuses on the Dakota, their ways of life and delves deeper into the atrocities of the Dakota War. Towards the end of part two, Ojibwe lifeways are touched on, including traditional foods and how birch bark was integral to daily life.

Part three focuses on the allotment of land and blood quantum by discussing what happened to the White Earth Reservation, which was created in 1867, when the Nelson Act was passed in 1889. Boarding schools are also discussed more in depth in this segment.

“One of the first Native traditions to come under assault at the boarding schools was the names of the Indian students,”¯ one of the students says in the video. “Symbolically, the casting off of the Indian name and the assumption of a Christian name was the first sign that civility had indeed touched the savage.”

Part four starts the discussion about economic revitalization through American Indian gaming, how it has helped not just Natives and the pros and cons of the industry. Toward the end, see how much a random sampling of people around the university know about Native Americans.

The final installment of the documentary discusses working toward justice and how an apology will begin the healing process.

Related stories:

Sacred White Buffalo Killed, Skinned

Native American Says He Was Branded in Hospital Hate Crime

Colorado: Native American History an “Atrocity,” not “Genocide”

 

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Photo credit: Treaty of Traverse des Sioux, Minn. July 23,1851 [Sioux]. From painting by Frank Barnell Mayer.

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58 comments

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6:17PM PDT on May 27, 2012

Deep and sincere...

2:02PM PDT on May 13, 2012

Rather than yelling, "America, f*ck yeah!", like complete idiots, we should work to transform this nation into a nation we can justifiably be proud of.

You know, a nation that doesn't trump up false reasons to start wars, a nation that isn't consumed with war, a nation that makes certain that all citizens are treated with equal justice regardless of their race or income level and a nation that encourages all citizens to participate in the democratic process.

To achieve such an ideal nation we should first seek to right the obviously wrongs of the past. I can think of no better place to start than apologizing to the Indians. After the Indians there is a long list of others deserving of an apology.

5:20PM PDT on May 11, 2012

Yes an apology is the least they should do.

5:20PM PDT on May 11, 2012

Yes an apology is the least they should do.

1:06PM PDT on May 11, 2012

For what? I don't see anything to apologize for.

7:21AM PDT on May 11, 2012

Johnice,
actually many First Nations people use the term "Indian."
Its used all the time here in Oklahoma. We use it among ourselves, when we aren't referring to our specific nation or anothers nation. Some even dislike being referred to as "Native American."
so much for political correctness, eh?

5:03AM PDT on May 11, 2012

The author should apologize for incorrectly labeling the people he is reporting on, the long accepted term: Native Americans reads more accurately and gives more weight to the article.

9:15PM PDT on May 10, 2012

sorry about the typo's an apology to All Native American's is in order

9:14PM PDT on May 10, 2012

overdue an apoogly to all Native Ameericans is in order

2:27PM PDT on May 10, 2012

Long overdue ... for the entire United States.

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