START A PETITION 25,136,189 members: the world's largest community for good
START A PETITION
x
2,618,368 people care about Environment & Wildlife

Oklahoma Will Charge Customers Who Install Their Own Solar Panels

Oklahoma Will Charge Customers Who Install Their Own Solar Panels

Written by Kiley Kroh

Oklahoma residents who produce their own energy through solar panels or small wind turbines on their property will now be charged an additional fee, the result of a new bill passed by the state legislature and expected to be signed into law by Gov. Mary Fallin (R).

On Monday, S.B. 1456 passed the state House 83-5 after no debate. The measure creates a new class of customers: those who install distributed power generation systems like solar panels or small wind turbines on their property and sell the excess energy back to the grid. While those with systems already installed won’t be affected, the new class of customers will now be charged a monthly fee — a shift that happened quickly and caught many in the state off guard.

“We knew nothing about it and all of a sudden it’s attached to some other bill,” Ctaci Gary, owner of Sun City Oklahoma, told ThinkProgress. “It just appeared out of nowhere.”

Because the surcharge amount has not been determined, Gary is cautious about predicting the impact it will have on her business. She has already received multiple calls from people asking questions about the bill and wanting to have solar systems installed before the new fee takes effect. “We’re going to use it as a marketing tool,” Gary said. “People deserve to have an opportunity [to install their own solar panels] and not be charged.”

“It is unfortunate that some utilities that enthusiastically support wind power for their own use are promoting a regressive policy that will make it harder for their customers to use wind power on their own,” said Mike Bergey, president & CEO of Bergey Windpower in Norman, Okla., in a statement. “Oklahoma offers tax credits for large wind turbines which are built elsewhere, but wants to penalize small wind which we manufacture here in the state? That makes no sense to me.”

The bill was staunchly opposed by renewable energy advocates, environmental groups and the conservative group TUSK, but had the support of Oklahoma’s major utilities. “Representatives of Oklahoma Gas and Electric Co. and Public Service Co. of Oklahoma said the surcharge is needed to recover some of the infrastructure costs to send excess electricity safely from distributed generation back to the grid,” the Oklahoman reported.

“We’re not anti-solar or anti-wind or trying to slow this down, we’re just trying to keep it fair,” Oklahoma Gas and Electric Co. spokeswoman Kathleen O’Shea told the Oklahoman. “We’ve been studying this trend. We know it’s coming, and we want to get ahead of it.”

But distributed energy sources also provide a clear value to utility companies. Solar generates during peak hours, when a utility has to provide electricity to more people than at other times during the day and energy costs are at their highest. Solar panels actually feed excess energy back to the grid, helping to alleviate the pressure during peak demand. In addition, because less electricity is being transmitted to customers through transmission lines, it saves utilities on the wear and tear to the lines and cost of replacing them with new ones.

As the use of solar power skyrockets across the U.S., fights have sprung up in several states over how much customers should be compensated for excess power produced by their solar panels and sold back to the grid — a policy known as net metering. Net metering laws have come under fire from the secretive American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), a group backed by fossil fuel corporations, utility companies and the ultra-conservative Koch brothers. Forty-three states and the District of Columbia currently have net metering policies in place, and ALEC has set its sights on repealing them, referring to homeowners with their own solar panels as “freeriders on the system.” ALEC presented Gov. Fallin the Thomas Jefferson Freedom award last year for her “record of advancing the fundamental Jeffersonian principles of free markets, limited government, federalism and individual liberty as a nationally recognized leader.”

Oklahoma “could be the first complete defeat for solar advocates in their fight against utility efforts to recover costs lost to DG [distributed generation] use,” writes Utility Dive. Net metering survived attacks in Colorado and Kansas, and Vermont recently increased its policy in a bipartisan effort. Last year, Arizona added what amounts to a $5 per month surcharge for solar customers, a move that was widely seen as a compromise, particularly after ALEC and other Koch-backed groups got involved.

While any extra charge placed on potential customers is a concern, Gary hopes that like Arizona, Oklahoma’s fee is modest enough to protect her business from serious damage.

Matt Kasper, energy research assistant at the Center for American Progress, contributed to this piece.

This post originally appeared on ThinkProgress

Read more: , , , , , ,

Photo Credit: Thinkstock

have you shared this story yet?

some of the best people we know are doing it

163 comments

+ add your own
1:09PM PDT on Jul 15, 2014

One more way for state governments to get your hard earned dollar. Especially women who don't earn as much as men!

6:10AM PDT on Jul 6, 2014

Charming place, Oklahoma.

3:50PM PDT on Jun 4, 2014

Kind of stupid. My utility worked with me and the company I used to install solar, and it didn't cost me anything. NADA. It's sort of a lease program. Nothing up front, and no tax credits. Power to the grid.

11:27AM PDT on Jun 3, 2014

Shame

10:28PM PDT on May 10, 2014

Typical politicians with power companies pulling their strings. I am not surprised by this but I am disheartened to see how blatent the offense is and the politicians flaunt it. It really shows that there is little to no hope for a government recovery away from greedy politicians.

6:14AM PDT on Apr 23, 2014

I first thought this was outrageous, then ridiculous. The correct descriptor, though, is stupid. What's next? A fee for growing your own veggies?

6:49PM PDT on Apr 22, 2014

Even if those utilities owned the coal fired plants and nuke plants, it cost massive amount of money to run then, so why would they call it a 'free ride' when individuals are selling some of their home made power into the grid? Seems to me they're getting a good deal.

5:20PM PDT on Apr 22, 2014

Unlike the inspiring old musical, "Oklahoma!", Oklahoma, you're not OK any more.

6:20AM PDT on Apr 21, 2014

Typical, politicians doing the bidding of their masters against the public interest, dirt bags!!

4:16PM PDT on Apr 20, 2014

Oh good grief--I understand the motivation, but this really does take the biscuit...

add your comment



Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of
Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

ads keep care2 free

Recent Comments from Causes

if the tails were a problem they would have already been extinct. those feathers aren't that heavy, …

People who talk about global warming/climate change made by man should have their heads examend...Al…

This article shows both sides of humanity. I am proud to be human when I read about the rescuers and…

Story idea? Want to blog? Contact the editors!
ads keep care2 free

more from causes

Animal Welfare

Causes Canada

Causes UK

Children

Civil Rights

Education

Endangered Wildlife

Environment & Wildlife

Global Development

Global Warming

Health Policy

Human Rights

LGBT rights

Politics

Real Food

Trailblazers For Good

Women's Rights




Select names from your address book   |   Help
   

We hate spam. We do not sell or share the email addresses you provide.