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Red Carpet Reveals True Status of Women in Hollywood

Red Carpet Reveals True Status of Women in Hollywood

Last night’s Academy Award Ceremony mixed a major “first” for one woman in Hollywood, with status quo treatment for others. Kathryn Bigelow won the Best Director award for The Hurt Locker. She is the first woman to ever win in the category. In fact, only four women have even been nominated for Best Director in the 82-year history of the awards: Lina Wertmuller in 1976, Jane Campion in 1993, Sofia Coppola in 2003 and Bigelow.

 

Outside of Bigelow’s much lauded and historic win, the Oscars were business as usual for women in Hollywood. The ceremonies were kicked off by an opening number staring Neil Patrick Harris surrounded by scantily clad Vegas-style showgirls and then hosted by two male hosts: Steve Martin and Alec Baldwin. The show featured several all-male categories (outside of Best Male Actor and Best Male Supporting Actor) including Original Score, Visual Effects and Cinematography.

 

And on the red carpet, the different treatment of male and female celebrities was blatant. Most of the women who graced the red carpet were beautifully turned out–perfect hair, perfect makeup, perfect wardrobe. Sarah Jessica Parker lived up to her fashion icon status in Chanel couture. Diane Kruger, also in Chanel, looked great, and Queen Latifah was dressed to perfection  in a lavender gown with jeweled trim.

 

The women in the 50+ set looked stunning. Helen Mirren wore a beautiful icy gown complemented by flawless hair and makeup, and Sigourney Weaver looked stunning in red. The men,  however,  were noticeably less groomed than the women. Even though many of the male actors were dressed impeccably in Tom Ford tuxedos, their hair–on top of their heads and on their faces–was quite casual. It wasn’t just the 50+ set sporting gray hair this year. Even men like Matthew Broderick and George Clooney, who haven’t hit the half century mark, let their true colors show.  

 

For years, and perhaps always, looks have mattered as much as talent in Hollywood–and not just for women, but for men, too. (“High School Musical” star, Zac Efron, was sporting a generous amount of hair gel last night.) But the red carpet underscores the fact women in show business are held to a much higher (and somewhat ridiculous) beauty standard than their male counterparts.

 

Perhaps the most telling comment of the evening came from a celebrity interviewer who told Sandra Bullock, dressed to win in a gown that looked like liquid gold, “The starving was worth it.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

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83 comments

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4:57PM PDT on Apr 1, 2012

This is celebs's world they are always on the spot.

10:28PM PDT on Apr 22, 2010

Women need to work on their self-esteem. You don't have to be "dressed to the nines", botoxed to the hilt, wear someone else's hair etc to be naturally beautiful. If men have decided to look more natural on the red carpet by sporting their grey hair, so should women. Come on girls, stop pandering to the masses !

6:31PM PDT on Mar 21, 2010

"This is a man's world".

7:40AM PDT on Mar 21, 2010

Great post and great points made!

8:22PM PDT on Mar 16, 2010

thanks for the post

8:21PM PDT on Mar 16, 2010

interesting

4:31AM PDT on Mar 15, 2010

All Women are prety , each has her advatages and humanity aspect.
What distinguish is love, honesty, trust and humanitarian senses.

10:37AM PDT on Mar 14, 2010

Not only in show business. Generally, beauty standards are higher for women.

9:07PM PST on Mar 13, 2010

Hey wasn't Barbara Strysand nominated as director for Yentil. Of course she did not win but I thought she was nominated. Truthfully she should have won.

12:45AM PST on Mar 12, 2010

thanks

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