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Top 10 Ways to Remember the Titanic (Slideshow)

Top 10 Ways to Remember the Titanic (Slideshow)
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This Sunday, April 15, is the 100-year anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic. The mammoth passenger liner set sail on April 6 with 2,223 people on board from Southampton, England. Bound for Pier 59 in Chelsea in New York city, the Titanic struck an iceberg in the North Atlantic Ocean on April 15, 1912. Within just two hours and 40 minutes, the Titanic had split apart and sunk; 1,157 people drowned in waters of 28 degrees F (-2 degrees C).

The disaster of a ship boasted to be unsinkable immediately fascinated the world and sparked, as an Associated Press article observes, a fascination, if not an obsession and a mania, for disasters.

With the centenary of the Titanic’s sinking here, something like Titanic-mania has been set loose. From its building (the Titanic was one of the three Olympic-class ocean liners of the White Star Line’s fleet) to its calamitous striking of the iceberg, the Titanic’s story is epic in scale. It is also tragic: What better conveys the hubris of us mortals than the tale of an Olympic ship undone by the forces of nature? Many a large-scale disaster, from the BP oil spill, the Challenger explosion, Hurricane Katrina, the Exxon Valdez and the recent grounding of the Costa Concordia — and such non-natural disasters as the subprime mortgage crisis and the European debt crisis — have “all borrowed from the storylines — morality plays, really — established by the Titanic’s sinking: The high-profile investigations … wall-to-wall news coverage … issues of blame, technological hubris, ignored warnings and economic fairness.”

A veritable Titanic industry exists of books, movies, museum exhibits, travel excursions to the site of the ship’s sinking, documentaries and who knows what else. What follows is a selection of ways to remember the Titanic and, most of all, those 1,157 people — many of whom had booked their voyage in hopes of starting a better life in America — who lost their lives.

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Image by Willy Stöwer via Wikimedia Commons

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89 comments

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12:58PM PDT on Jun 28, 2012

thanks

6:26AM PDT on Apr 18, 2012

It was a human error to do with the weather

12:13AM PDT on Apr 18, 2012

I think it was preplanned.speeding up the titanic and then bumping into an iceberg by such an experienced captain?sounds like some notable and influencial people were supposed to be killed on the titanic.this was a big plan made to look like a disaster.

11:27PM PDT on Apr 16, 2012

tragic and sad ,frightening and creepy.

8:10PM PDT on Apr 16, 2012

Thanks for the article !

11:34AM PDT on Apr 16, 2012

This will always be one of the worlds saddest tragedies that hits you everytime even though you know the story and have seen everything on it. Its just so tragic. :(

9:36AM PDT on Apr 16, 2012

A terrible thing - but not as bad as the U-Boats torpedoing all the Allied shipping.in both World Wars.

Cowardly.

9:33AM PDT on Apr 16, 2012

Thank GOD we have a good Coastguard system nowadays.

8:59AM PDT on Apr 16, 2012

very sad, indeed

8:13AM PDT on Apr 16, 2012

Actually I think that it was more than 1,500 souls who lost their lives that night/early morning. And for me knowing that those who perished also included at least 9 dogs who suffered just as greatly as those who drown in that cold, cold water.

And yes, Christine, I have to agree with you. I had no idea that Titantic's first class menu had included foie gras. I am trying to get a local restaurant {voted Restaurant of the Year} to stop serving it. Foie gras is barbaric to the poor ducks and I have no way to understand how people can eat it. Dispicable stuff............................

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Kristina Chew Kristina Chew teaches ancient Greek, Latin and Classics at Saint Peter's University in New Jersey.... more
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