Unlimited Corporate Influence Can’t Go Unchallenged

Today, the Supreme Court opened the floodgates for corporations to spend obscene amounts of money to sway federal elections. In a 5-4 rule this morning, the Roberts Court sided with powerful corporate interests, giving them even more voice in the political process and further stifling the voice of the American People in the Citizens United v. FEC case. This Court’s decision is historic and has the potential to distort and corrupt the political process.

Our democracy and the future of environmental legislation is in jeopardy. In 2009, oil and gas industries spent $7.8 million in campaign contributions and $120.7 million in lobbying; with the Court’s decision, those industries can now spend unlimited amounts in independent expenditures. Now, if a member of Congress is considering regulating oil and gas companies, corporations like ExxonMobil could spend virtually unlimited amounts from their general funds on television ads, direct mail, or phone banks to defeat that member. Will this influence members’ votes on key environmental legislation because they fear unlimited money being used to campaign against them?


Based on the Court’s decision, Congress needs to act quickly to empower everyday Americans and end the undue influence of big money on our elected officials. We urge Congress to include the Fair Elections Now Act (S. 752/H.R. 1826) as part of the legislative solution to Citizens United. The Court has radically changed the political landscape and Congress needs to act to put democracy back in the hands of the American people, not corporations.

Love This? Never Miss Another Story.


Elizabeth Sowers
Liz Sowers2 years ago

Thank you Janice P for your info. I also like to watch Bill Moyers and his guests.

Ginger M.
Ginger M.2 years ago

AS Sandra W. said, "Large corporations have been way too powerful for many years. Our leaders have become their slaves."

Actually, they have become their whores, being well paid for their services.

Read more: http://www.care2.com/causes/unrestricted-corporate-influence-cant-be-allowed.html#ixzz2HUYRHwPo

Janice P.
Janice P.5 years ago

All of this occurring at a time when Bill Moyers, who has always been a champion of true democracy and the people's rights, is leaving the Journal. This is terribly sad for those of us who seek to understand what our elected officials and their benefactors, the corporations, are doing to us.

I LOVE the idea that one of Bill Moyers' latest guests had. If corporations are to be given equivalent "personhood" status with real human beings, perhaps they should be subject to the same laws as human beings - such as the "Three strikes, you're out" law. How many corporate executives would be in jail for life and how many would lose their voting rights after having committed 3 criminal offenses, such as fraud, on behalf of their companies? How many corporations would no longer be able to contribute to - or outright "buy" - any politicians? Think of the fallout from this financial collapse, alone.

For those of you who have not seen it, please listen to Bill Moyers Journal on PBS from April 23rd. It, as usual, is very enlightening.

Ellinor S.
Ellinor S.5 years ago

thank you

Gwendolyn K.
Gwendolyn Krupa5 years ago

It's sad that these lobbyists are allowed to have great stores of cash behind. There should at least be a cap. We elected our representatives and they don't always hear us for all the big business noise!

Kay B.
Kay Beams5 years ago

I cannot believe that we are giving corporations and their lobbyists more power rather than less as the American people want. This is terrible. What happened to government by the people for the people?

Edward Craig
Edward Craig5 years ago

Please challenge the "too big to fail" abusive monopolies.
A legal fiction has no First Amendment rights.

Georgia L.
Georgia L.5 years ago

http://movetoamend.org/ sign please, this ruling is a travesty.

Sandy and Tigger
Sandra Watson5 years ago

Large corporations have been way too powerful for many years. Our leaders have become their slaves.

Kurt Valentine