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Women Carry Expensive Purses to Defend Their Men, Study Says

Women Carry Expensive Purses to Defend Their Men, Study Says

A recent study concluded that women want designer handbags only to warn other women to steer clear of their male partners.

Unless “Touch My Man and I’ll Cut You” is printed on expensive purses in some magical ink visible only to females, it’s hard to follow the reasoning here. This is the information that the two University of Minnesota scientists who conducted the study had to work with:

1) They asked women to imagine another woman flirting with their male partner.

2) They then asked the women to draw a luxury designer logo on a purse.

3) The women drew bigger logos than those in “other conditions” — a mysterious reference to some undescribed control group.

A press release from their university says that the researchers may have considered the findings of some other studies as well, but didn’t explain how those studies worked.

From this data, the researchers — Associate Professor Vladas Griskevicius and PhD student Yajin Wang of the Carlson School of Management — deduced that single women carry expensive handbags to warn other women to stay away from their hypothetical future boyfriends.

The academics’ thought process goes like this:

1) Women drew larger designer logos because imagining someone else flirting with their men made them jealous. Even the women who didn’t want or have men were motivated by this jealousy.

2.a) Women believe that the cost of a woman’s handbag is correlated to the intensity of her man’s devotion to her.

2.b) Unstated assumption: women believe that other women get all their purses as gifts from their men. Left unexplained is the paucity of men among the shoppers in high-end handbag boutiques.

2.c) Women can gauge the price of a bag just by looking at it, while men “have a hard time figuring out if a woman’s handbag costs $50 or $5,000,” as Griskevicius puts it — even though men are supposedly the ones buying all the $5,000 bags.

I don’t know how I, as a female, managed to finish college without coming across the ladies-only course on identifying and valuing designer brands, but somehow I lack that womanly skill. The researchers should have consulted someone who does have it — they would have learned that bigger logos are generally a sign of a less expensive designer bag. The priciest ones tend to bear very discreet logos. Maybe those jealous women drew bigger logos because they were preparing to economize should they become single.

3) Women believe that other women won’t flirt with a man who is deeply devoted to someone else.

4) Women carry expensive bags to demonstrate to other women that their men are very devoted to them, as evidenced by the bags’ high price.

5) Single women spend their own money on expensive purses so other women will understand that any men they may have in the future will be highly devoted to them. Wang explained, “the single woman is saying back off my future man.” I guess the pricey-purse-carrying single lesbian, who does not exist in Wang-land, is saying “I don’t want a man, but if I did, and if I had one, you would be well-advised not to flirt with him.” That message is surely worth spending a few grand.

Professor Griskevicius impugns the intelligence of coupled gals who, like me, cannot conceive of a good reason to spend four or five figures on a purse. “Conspicuous consumption is actually smart for women who want to protect their relationship. When a woman is flaunting designer products, it says to other women ‘back off my man.’”

There’s that magical ink again, turning handbags into billboards that only flirtatious women can read.

Griskevicius’s doctoral student, Wang, adds, ”The feeling that a relationship is being threatened by another woman automatically triggers women to want to flash Gucci, Chanel, and Fendi to other women. A designer handbag or a pair of expensive shoes seems to work like a shield, where wielding a Fendi handbag successfully fends off romantic rivals.”

Well gosh, these men know ladies and our automatic triggers so well! And they have thoroughly explained why wealthy, showy women are never ever cheated on.

The researchers also have Oprah’s number. The billionaire was interested in a $38,000 handbag she saw at a Zurich boutique. She claimed the clerk wouldn’t show it to her, saying it was “too expensive” for her, apparently because she is black; the clerk denied it; Oprah apologized; Switzerland apologized; blah blah blah.

We now know that the truly newsworthy point here has nothing to do with race. It is that Oprah must be worried about her man of 25 yearsStedman Graham, deciding to stray. The proof is right in this study.

The shorthand for these scientists’ findings: everything women do is about men, including keeping our wallets and keys close at hand when we are out. Without men we would revert to packing our stuff in plastic bags and pushing it around in shopping carts. We would languish, rudderless, as Oprah retired because what would she need money for?

Dear cheating men: thank you for giving us a reason to go on.

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Photo credit: iStockphoto/Thinkstock

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198 comments

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10:13AM PDT on Sep 3, 2013

I have trouble understanding why anyone pays extra to buy something with a designer logo. If it's to impress people with your wealth, it might make you more vulnerable to becoming a victim of theft. If a designer wants me to wear their logo, they should pay me!!

1:48PM PDT on Aug 30, 2013

Esworth L. That is the point.. We have seen the content.. And personally find it deplorable.. and hardly scholarly.

By the way i read peer reviewed magazines on a variety of subjects. Personally I can understand why these authors found a small magazine to get publish. As none of the larger ones would accept such tripe to even send to any peer to review.

1:27PM PDT on Aug 30, 2013

Judge the article by its content, not by the publisher.


http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:On3WjRdiPYUJ:www.carlsonschool.umn.edu/DirectoriesPM/FileService/GetFile.ashx/%3Fpubid%3D8802+Vladas+Griskevicius+Yajin+Wang&cd=2&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us

1:09PM PDT on Aug 30, 2013

http://www.carlsonschool.umn.edu/DirectoriesPM/FileService/GetFile.ashx/?pubid=8802

The (.) was the problem... The "peer reviewed" umm magazine is one that markets itself to managers and execs trying to look like they understand their industry.. If this is the est it can produce. I think I would give the entire thing a pass. As it seems it will publish such nonsense as this "paper".

http://www.ejcr.org/general.htm
Founded in 1974, the Journal of Consumer Research publishes scholarly research that describes and explains consumer behavior. Empirical, theoretical, and methodological articles spanning fields such as psychology, marketing, sociology, economics, communications, and anthropology are featured in this interdisciplinary journal. The primary thrust of JCR is academic, rather than managerial, with topics ranging from micro-level processes (such as brand choice) to more macro-level issues (such as the development of materialistic values)."

Basically the only people who read this are managers and low level executives. Trying to look intelligent. No wonder why so many managers sound like fools.

12:59PM PDT on Aug 30, 2013

Try this, Great White

http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.1086/673256?uid=3739256&uid=2&uid=4&sid=21102597829443

12:54PM PDT on Aug 30, 2013

Esworth L.,

Result when I tried to use the link you provided.

Server Error in '/DirectoriesPM' Application.
Input string was not in a correct format.
Description: An unhandled exception occurred during the execution of the current web request. Please review the stack trace for more information about the error and where it originated in the code.

Exception Details: System.FormatException: Input string was not in a correct format.

Source Error:

An unhandled exception was generated during the execution of the current web request. Information regarding the origin and location of the exception can be identified using the exception stack trace below.

Stack Trace:


[FormatException: Input string was not in a correct format.]
System.Number.StringToNumber(String str, NumberStyles options, NumberBuffer& number, NumberFormatInfo info, Boolean parseDecimal) +10725831
System.Number.ParseInt32(String s, NumberStyles style, NumberFormatInfo info) +145
System.Convert.ToInt32(String value) +43
DirectoriesPM.FileService.GetFile.ProcessRequest(HttpContext context) +487
System.Web.CallHandlerExecutionStep.System.Web.HttpApplication.IExecutionStep.Execute() +341
System.Web.HttpApplication.ExecuteStep(IExecutionStep step, Boolean& completedSynchronously) +69


Version Information: Microsoft .NET Framework Version:4.0.30319; ASP.NET Version:4.0.30319.18044

12:51PM PDT on Aug 30, 2013

Esworth L.,

Great Idea! Please, post there E-Mail(s0 or Contact Information on here and I will do the same. Though, I must say, that I doubt they will do anything.

10:12AM PDT on Aug 30, 2013

I plan to write to the study's authors, suggesting that they log in here and write their next paper on your comments. A rich and fruitful field!

9:45AM PDT on Aug 30, 2013

Have any of you looked at the published paper? Here's the link

http://www.carlsonschool.umn.edu/DirectoriesPM/FileService/GetFile.ashx/?pubid=8802.

Its in press at the Journal of Consumer Research. That means its peer reviewed, and has been found by by the author's contemporaries to have sound scientific merit. There is no higher research standard. Do you all know better than the review committee? People who have worked in this field for years and years? If so, I suggest that you visit them at http://www.ejcr.org/ and tell them your ideas.

9:27AM PDT on Aug 30, 2013

In the second place, when I see a lot of emotional denial, like I see in here, I suspect that the deniers have had a nerve touched.

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