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For Better or Worse, You Can Thank This Man for Modern Fitness

For Better or Worse, You Can Thank This Man for Modern Fitness
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Across America and, indeed, throughout the world, gym fanatics are in mourning for Joe Weider, considered by many the father of the modern health and fitness industry, who died at the age of 93 last Saturday at his Los Angeles home.

You might not know the name Joe Weider, but if you’ve ever picked up a dumbbell, taken a fitness supplement, or glanced at a fitness magazine, its highly likely that you are not far removed from Weider’s legacy.

Weider: Not Just The Man Who Nurtured Arnold

Let’s get the obligatory name-check out of the way: Weider is largely responsible for introducing the world — and specifically the United States — to the eponymous bodybuilder turned actor turned politician, Arnold Schwarzenegger.

It’s little wonder, then, that Schwarzenegger was among the first to make a public statement about Weider’s death, saying, “I knew about Joe Weider long before I met him – he was the godfather of fitness who told all of us to ‘Be Somebody with a Body.’ He taught us that through hard work and training we could all be champions. [...] I know that countless others around the world found motivation in the pages of his publications just as I did, but as I read his articles in Austria, I felt that he was speaking directly to me and I committed to move to America to make my vision of becoming the best bodybuilder, to live the American dream, and to become an actor a reality.”

Weider would go on to help Schwarzenegger with his training, be the driving force behind landing him his first movie role and even helped promote Schwarzenegger’s run for Governor.

But Joe Weider’s legacy extends much further than this.

The Skinny Kid Who Made it Big

Montreal-born Weider was by his own admission the skinny kid who got bullied at school. He was even turned down for a place on the wrestling team because the coach worried Weider was too fragile for the sport.

Weider refused to let that image define him. He famously claimed that at 14, he built a set of barbells out of car wheels and axles and began lifting.

Word soon got around about the kid pumping iron in his parent’s garage. Weider was then invited to join a weightlifting club and, by his own admission, he was “mesmerized” by, not only the poundages lifted or the physiques being built, but by the way the men in that gym supported and helped one another.

Weider won his first bodybuilding contest at age 17 and earned the nickname Master Blaster. At about this time, the industrious Weider also published Your Physique magazine, his first but certainly not his last foray into the magazine industry.

He also began to set down or, in his own words, “codify” for the first time, the principles that he witnessed being used at the weightlifting clubs he visited; those techniques that led to muscle gain, fat loss and potentially a healthier way of life.

These became known as the Weider Principles. While some have spawned problematic misunderstandings, one culprit being the idea of ” muscle confusion,” many are supported by science and in some version are still practiced in gyms up and down the country today, such as the idea of keeping the muscle being worked under continuous tension, and the idea of progressive overload for encouraging muscle growth and strength gains.

Weider Shapes a Generation of Fitness, The Good and Bad

Next came Weider’s mail order barbell business and, with the help of his bodybuilder younger brother Ben, the formation of the International Federation of Bodybuilders and staging of the first Mr. Canada bodybuilding competition.

A slew of magazines followed, many of which are still in print today. These include Muscle and Fitness, Flex, Men’s Fitness, Muscle and Fitness Hers, Shape, and Fit Pregnancy.

In 1965, Weider would go on to create one of bodybuilding’s iconic events, the Mr. Olympia competition. He would add to that with a Ms. Olympia contest in 1980, the Fitness Olympia in 1995 and the Figure Olympia in 2003, and in that time inspired local, regional and national competitions across the globe.

Add to this Joe Weider branded fitness equipment that aimed to better serve the isolation techniques and pyramid training found in the Weider Principles, and the Weider brand supplements (Weider Nutrition, now Schiff Nutrition International), some of the very first protein shakes, testosterone boosters and fat blockers on the market that claimed to help a generation fuel the gym-time that would earn them the body of their dreams.

But with this came legal issues. Weider’s nutrition products and programs sometimes made factually dubious claims. In 1972, Weider was forced to change his marketing of a product that claimed to allow you to pack on a pound (implied: of muscle) a day.

Further legal challenges were made about Weider’s use of suspect Before and After testimonials, while a pattern of legal wrangling with the FTC started and would last until the year 2000 when, as part of a $400,000 settlement, Weider’s company agreed to a ban on making unsubstantiated claims in the marketing of its drug, dietary supplement, food or fitness programs.

And Weider’s legacy isn’t all glowing, either.

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Photo credit: Wikipedia

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27 comments

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4:49PM PDT on Apr 5, 2013

Thanks!

2:34AM PDT on Apr 1, 2013

Thank you for sharing

7:58PM PDT on Mar 29, 2013

The fact that he lived to 93, is a testament to his own healthful living habits.

4:55PM PDT on Mar 29, 2013

TY

4:36PM PDT on Mar 29, 2013

ty

2:57PM PDT on Mar 29, 2013

Some commenters here have the wrong view of weight lifting. If done properly it not only protects and strenghthen the bones (really important for women) it also does increase fitness levels I can attest to that as a long distance runner weights on and off made me faster and less injury prone! I now power walk up hills with weights and it burns twice the calories and keeps on working . Muscles are like little machines they are living tissues and the muscles are what burns the fat. Therefore the more muscle the more calories burned even at rest. Women cannot bulk up like men. I really wish more women understood this before they went knocking it!

2:52PM PDT on Mar 29, 2013

I have a Weider weight bench. 93 he obviously did something right.

11:31AM PDT on Mar 29, 2013

He doesnt' hold the entire way to fitness. I would rather take ballet or tai chi.

10:56AM PDT on Mar 29, 2013

I've never associated body-building with "fitness". Taken to the extreme, in fact, it pretty much grosses me out. I'd choose Jack LaLanne who has his own interesting history.

10:50AM PDT on Mar 29, 2013

ty

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