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You Can’t Bleach Autism Out of a Child

You Can’t Bleach Autism Out of a Child
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Since my teenage son Charlie was diagnosed with autism almost 13 years ago in July of 1999, we have heard of too many “remedies,” “treatments” and “cures” for autism to count. Most have promised miraculous results; pretty much all are presented by their practitioners as “science-based”; many are on a collision course with what any of us would do to treat any condition. The most recent, and one of the most boggling-the-mind, treatment we have heard of is bleach.

Yes, the very substance you perhaps use as a household cleanser is being discussed as a treatment that “recovers” children from autism, at a conference called Autism One this weekend.

Bleach Enemas As a “Treatment” For Autism

Autism One is an annual conference whose stated mission is to educate “parents, professionals, and the public about the care, treatment, recovery and prevention of autism and related disorders by making critical information available through new channels as well as traditional ones.” Educational therapies (such as behavior, speech and occupational therapy) and medication (antipsychotics, antidepressants and others ) would be considered “traditional” while the “new channels” referred to tend to be in the area of experimental biomedical treatments, often drawn from complementary and alternative medicine.

One speaker, Kerri Rivera, says that 38 children recovered from autism in 20 months via Miracle Mineral Solution (MMS), a treatment she offers at her clinic, AutismO2 Clinica Hyperbarica, in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. As science blogger Orac writes after reviewing the clinic’s website, MMS “in essence, is industrial strength bleach, 28% sodium chlorite in distilled water.” Orac continues:

It is frequently diluted in acidic juices, such as orange juice, resulting in the formation of chlorine dioxide, which is, as the FDA characterized it, “a potent bleach used for stripping textiles and industrial water treatment.” According to its proponents, MMS can cure almost anything: cancer, AIDS, and just about any other serious disease you can imagine. Never mind that there is no biological plausibility and no evidence, either preclinical or clinical, that MMS can do what its proponents claim it can do. True, bleach can kill bacteria or cancer cells in a dish at a high enough concentration, but that doesn’t mean it’s a useful antibiotic or chemotherapeutic. agent.

From her website, it seems that Rivera “treats” autistic children by giving them MMS by mouth and by enema, as well as recommending that they bathe them in it.

As Orac says of this very questionable treatment using industrial chemicals, “if there’s any form of quackery out there, someone, somewhere will be using it on autistic children.”

Recovery From Autism vs. Autism As Lifelong

Besides bleach, autism treatments we have heard of over the years include fecal implants, far-infrared sauna therapy, camel’s milk (on this year’s Autism One agenda) and chemical castration using the drug lupron.

Be critical of such treatments (as I am doing here) and you will find yourself harshly critiqued for denying hope to others and for not being yourself willing to “do everything to help your child.”

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197 comments

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3:10PM PDT on Aug 24, 2012

I feel that the author is a very good parent. Your child is who he is, and instead of trying every "cure" out there, love the child you have as he is, and do all you can to give him a great life.

7:11AM PDT on Aug 6, 2012

I am shocked to hear that people actually believed giving an autistic child bleach will "cure" them. After working alongside preschool children with autism for a week I have learnt a lot about it and the importance of communication and one-on-one care with autistic children. It felt gratifying to be able to watch children learn to cope in different circumstances and tolerate new caregivers, as I had not previously met any of them before. I feel very strongly about autism now and I'm very interested in the various schemes and measures taken to help autistic children and teach them the little things we take for granted in life.

9:18AM PDT on Jun 15, 2012

This is the rest of that article :

The research team mixed together the anti-epileptic drug carbamazepine with two SSRI antidepressants, fluoxetine and venlafaxine, at very low concentrations, and added them to the water in which fathead minnow fish were swimming.

After 18 days’ exposure, the 324 genes specifically associated with autism had been altered – and yet other genes were unaffected.

The researchers’ suspicions that the same could be happening in humans has been strengthened by earlier studies that discovered pregnant women taking an SSRI are more likely to give birth to an autistic child.

(Source: PLoS One, 2012; doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0032917).

9:13AM PDT on Jun 15, 2012

Hmm - it also seems our drinking water could be the culprit for upsetting young brains from this article in What Doctors Dont Tell You. If I'd a little one in the family nowadays I think I'd try and be on the safe side and use only well filtered water for them.

Drugs in the water supply could be causing autism
Antidepressants and other anti-psychotic drugs in the water supply could be a cause of autism in children, scientists suspect. Tiny traces of the drugs are in our drinking water, which might interfere with the developing fetus, and especially the genes associated with early brain development.

Scientists from Idaho State University have established that the drugs are triggering the genes in fish they tested, and they surmise the same could be happening in humans.

Pharmaceuticals are in the water system, including the water we drink, because filtration plants are unable to process them out. They get into the public water supply through human waste – the body is able to break down only around 20 per cent of any drug – and because people throw the drugs down the toilet.

The research team mixed together the anti-epileptic drug carbamazepine with two SSRI antidepressants, fluoxetine and venlafaxine, at very low concentrations, and added them to the water in which fathead minnow fish were swimming.

After 18 days’ exposure, the 324 genes specifically associated with autism had been altered – and yet other genes were unaffected.

The re

11:15AM PDT on Jun 11, 2012

It's ridiculous that people are trying to justify tormenting children like this. It isn't right. I would say, if you want to reduce the risk of autism, don't have children. Being human is the number one cause of autism.

11:32AM PDT on Jun 8, 2012

Yacking about the alleged safety of sodium chlorite is a common dodge among the quacks advocating MMS. They like to focus on it because the chlorine dioxide, which is what you actually take in, is a known carcinogen with a host of nasty side effects.

As for autism and vaccination, that "link" was debunked years ago. Wakefield's "research" was shown to have been faked. Now that Wakefield has lost his license to practice medicine in the UK, he's working with a clinic in the USA that gives autistic children enemas as part of an unproven "treatment".

11:32AM PDT on Jun 8, 2012

Yacking about the alleged safety of sodium chlorite is a common dodge among the quacks advocating MMS. They like to focus on it because the chlorine dioxide, which is what you actually take in, is a known carcinogen with a host of nasty side effects.

As for autism and vaccination, that "link" was debunked years ago. Wakefield's "research" was shown to have been faked. Now that Wakefield has lost his license to practice medicine in the UK, he's working with a clinic in the USA that gives autistic children enemas as part of an unproven "treatment".

11:34AM PDT on Jun 3, 2012

if you don't want your child to have autism, don't get them vaccinated. that'll cut their chances down a HUGE amount, if not completely.

12:44PM PDT on Jun 1, 2012

To think I was stupid enough to read the article and comments. JEEZ I need a nap : )

5:46AM PDT on May 31, 2012

Paula C.D.

There is NO sodium chlorite in the activated MMS product. Such misinformation out there. Just like in this article, journalists are writing about a product without getting their information from reputable sources. When you activate sodium chlorite with citric acid, you create a chemical reaction and the new product is chlorine dioxide....not sodium chlorite. Chemical reactions are not like baking with a recipe where the ingredients combine, but remain the same in the end....they change. Simple high school chemistry taught us this! When the chlorine dioxide reaches it's half-life in the body, which is about one hour, anything unused turns to table salt and oxygen...sounds REALLY dangerous! lol

Research Andreas Kalcker, he is a scientist who has been doing studies with MMS for human consumption for years. He is writing a book about it which is due to come out this summer. He has done conferences all over the world about it. And I will repeat, there ARE doctors on board with this, all over the world, even in the US.

This darn article has just created another form of misinformation to confuse those who are truly interested in using it, and have been unnecessarily scared away.

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