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11 Scary Fast Food Breakfasts

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11 Scary Fast Food Breakfasts

How would you like to meet your daily sodium and saturated fat allowance, as well as nearly half of your daily calorie needs, in one quick breakfast eaten on the road? It’s becoming progressively easy these day as food technicians, chefs and market researchers, holed away in corporate fast food “studios,” are busy developing monstrous new breakfast items. Trying to claim as much of the $57 billion fast food breakfast market as they can, the fast food giants are drumming up increasingly cheesy, steak-y, fried chicken-y breakfast dishes that tap into flavor combinations that have proven successful for lunch and dinner items. It’s no longer eggs and English muffins for fast food breakfast…breakfast burger anyone?

What’s most striking about some of these high-calorie items–aside from the unsustainable, industrial, often GMO and synthetic ingredients–is the very high sodium and saturated fat content. According to the USDA, the current recommendation for sodium consumption is less than 2,300 milligrams a day. For saturated fat, the maximum allowance is between 18 grams to 31 grams, depending on your caloric intake needs. (You can calculate your caloric need with this calculator from the Mayo Clinic.) Many of these breakfast items meet or exceed the daily sodium and fat allowances, and provide much more than one-third of your daily caloric needs.

1. Carl’s Jr Breakfast Burger
Yes, I’m afraid you read that right, “breakfast” and “burger” in the same menu item. How do you turn a regular burger into a breakfast burger? By adding not only an egg–but an egg, bacon, American cheese and hash brown nuggets too!

Calories: 780
Fat Calories: 370
Total Fat: 51 grams
Sat Fat: 15 grams
Sodium: 1460

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Read more: Diet & Nutrition, Eating for Health, Food, Health, Life, Transportation

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Melissa Breyer

Melissa Breyer is a writer and editor with a background in sustainable living, specializing in food, science and design. She is the co-author of True Food (National Geographic) and has edited and written for regional and international books and periodicals, including The New York Times Magazine. Melissa lives in Brooklyn, NY.

618 comments

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5:37PM PST on Feb 10, 2014

wow, I'm still the last one to comment on these disgusting breakfasts....

4:46PM PST on Jan 2, 2014

....yuck is right....I say if you're eating these regularly better call a cardiologist early....

11:18AM PDT on Sep 23, 2013

I think all these info could be put up in a single page rather than a slide show format

10:13AM PDT on Aug 18, 2013

If you eat meat there's nothing wrong with having a burger for breakfast (no different than eating sausage and toast).

In my meat-eating days I loved the fast-food breakfasts on occasion. Nothing scary about much of any food so long as it's eaten in moderation.

10:47PM PDT on Jul 23, 2013

make your own breakfast

11:02PM PDT on May 30, 2013

big fat heart attack special

9:11AM PDT on May 18, 2013

thank you

9:05AM PDT on May 18, 2013

Hmmm....It is very not too surprising or shocking to come across this article.The typical western style breakfast is either too greasy or too salty, which is not too good for the health!

8:02AM PDT on May 18, 2013

A hamburger for breakfast??????????!!!!!!!

4:38PM PDT on Mar 25, 2013

yuck

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