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11 Steps to a ‘Zero Waste’ Bedroom

11 Steps to a ‘Zero Waste’ Bedroom

“Zero waste” is a movement that’s rapidly gaining in popularity. It’s a lifestyle that embraces minimalism; rejects the ubiquitous disposable items that are everywhere in our society; challenges mainstream consumerism; and encourages people to come up with alternative reusable solutions to everyday life.

In the context of the articles I write about my personal quest for zero waste living, “waste” refers to municipal solid waste (MSW), not energy or water waste. MSW is the kind of trash that gets hauled to landfills. This also includes recycling, which may seem like a good thing, but has its own share of problems. (Read more about that here.)

No household is perfect, but small changes can yield big results. I still take out a bag of trash each week, but each time it’s a bit smaller. Instead of putting out an overflowing box of recycling every other week, I now do it only once a month. Hopefully these tips can guide and encourage you to pare down your household needs and to refuse, reduce, reuse, and recycle whenever you can.

Make your bedroom a sanctuary of simplicity and relaxation with the following zero waste tips.

In the closet:

1. Reduce the total number of clothes you keep. Choose the ones you love wearing and are comfortable, and get rid of superfluous ones crammed in the closet.

2. Wear out those clothes before you pitch them. Mend holes or have pieces fixed by a seamstress before tossing them in the trash. Take shoes to a cobbler before tossing.

3. Shop only once or twice a year, with a specific list of items in hand. This will reduce the likelihood of compulsive buys. Always take a reusable shopping bag.

4. Give priority to thrift stores and hand-me-downs. Next, visit local retailers and clothes designers. Try to avoid “fast fashion” chains as much as possible. Buying fewer and higher quality items is better in the long run than cheap “disposable” clothes, as they will last longer and are easier to repair.

5. When clothes reach their end of life, donate all wearable ones to thrift stores. For those that are beyond use, find a textile recycler such as Planet Aid that will turn your old clothes into paving materials, paper money, ball stuffings, and carpets.

In the bedroom:

6. Buy a green mattress that won’t off-gas.

7. Look for natural fiber bedding at thrift stores, where it comes without excess plastic packaging and tags. I have found many fabulous designer sheets with high cotton thread counts for mere dollars.

8. Reduce the amount of furniture in the bedroom. You don’t need more than a bed, reading light, and possibly a dresser. Less stuff means less to clean, organize, and pitch when it breaks.

9. If buying furniture, opt for used or antique items, as their carbon footprint per year of use is much less than anything new.

10. Make a headboard from something old, i.e. an old door, scrap wood, an iron gate. Use your imagination!

11. Keep a stack of handkerchiefs or flannel sheets handy at all times, instead of Kleenex.

article by Katherine Martinko

Read more: Bed & Bath, Conservation, Home

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Kara, selected from TreeHugger

Planet Green is the multi-platform media destination devoted to the environment and dedicated to helping people understand how humans impact the planet and how to live a more environmentally sustainable lifestyle. Its two robust websites, planetgreen.com and TreeHugger.com, offer original, inspiring, and entertaining content related to how we can evolve to live a better, brighter future. Planet Green is a division of Discovery Communications.

91 comments

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10:48AM PDT on Jul 9, 2014

Number 2. Wear out those clothes before you pitch them. Mend holes or have pieces fixed by a seamstress before tossing them in the trash. Take shoes to a cobbler before tossing. --- Makes no sense to me. If someone else wants them to use, let them do repairs. I cannot afford to fix stuff I won't be wearing.

4:58AM PDT on Jul 2, 2014

Thanks for the information! I do a lot of these already, but you gave me some new ideas!

6:23AM PDT on May 26, 2014

Should have mentioned that pots, pans and electronics are frequently pennies on the dollar as well....every day dishes and glassware for a song and if you are a fine china person it's happy days if you go on the last day of the sale because it's almost always in stellar condition, usually unwanted by the masses and sharply marked down....usually.

6:19AM PDT on May 26, 2014

Add estate sales to your list of places to shop. Yes, I know, lots of collectibles and 'dealers' will be there but many people pick up cleaning products, blankets and other bedding....personally I have a stellar batch of vintage linen sheets that I could never afford now but there are still a lot of 50's cotton sheets frequently new in package around and unused 50's 60's towels to be had for a song, all my linen tea towels were bought unused at estate sales. If you find some so-so linen towels do be aware that they replace paper towels for cleaning beautifully. Very high quality wool blankets will be pennies on the dollar....Hudson's Bay blankets have never topped 50 dollars in all my years of doing this. Because you're in the home of these products you can see what kind of environment these items come from.....hoarders, stick with china and glass or know what you are dealing with and clean immediately if you find something irresistible.

12:00AM PDT on May 25, 2014

Noted.

10:43AM PDT on May 24, 2014

Good ideas

11:52PM PDT on May 14, 2014

thnaks

2:32PM PDT on May 12, 2014

noted

2:35PM PDT on May 3, 2014

Love this article. Thank you!

3:41PM PDT on Apr 27, 2014

Have recycled most of my adult life...repaired, revamped and mend clothing and lucky enough to know an excellent cobbler..who.has repaired shoes/purses, redesigning an old butter soft purse into a bag for errand day. Also have a great thrift shop nearby where I find lots of gardening clothes. Sorry, but won't go back to handkerchiefs.
Purchase quality, neutral basics that stand the test of time and donate to several groups ...one is total clothing and another household items/furniture/books/etc. I box up any and all donations given by our complex...clothing beyond repair or use is given to another group for rags which they use for a fund raiser.

Save items that could be of multi purpose...we should not become hoarders but much work is needed on today's 'throw away' society.

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