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11 Surprising Uses for Yogurt

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11 Surprising Uses for Yogurt

Yogurt, the versatile dairy product made by fermenting milk with bacteria (AKA yogurt cultures) has a number of applications aside from the morning meal. It has a whole host of uses for health issues and can be employed in a few beauty formulas as well. Yogurt. It’s not just for breakfast anymore. (That was painfully cliché, I know, but it’s true!)

Fermentation of lactose by one or more varieties of bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Enterococcus faecium, Streptococcus thermophilus, and others) produces lactic acid  which turns milk into yogurt and gives it its texture and tangy taste. Those cultures also give yogurt its health-boosting qualities.

Look for yogurt labeled with a “Live and Active Cultures” seal from the National Yogurt Association, indicating the product reliably contains at least 100 million active cultures per gram of yogurt. Opt for organic if you can afford it and it’s available–and buy it in large containers to save on packaging, or make your own.

1. Lower cholesterol
Taking yogurt that contains Lactobacillus acidophilus and a combination of Enterococcus faecium and Streptococcus thermophilus seems to lower cholesterol for people with borderline to moderate high cholesterol levels. This type of yogurt is thought to lower total and “bad” low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol but does not raise “good” high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol.

For lowering cholesterol, according to WebMD: Several different doses have been tried depending on the preparation. A typical dose of 200 mL of yogurt containing Lactobacillus acidophilus per day has been used. A combination product of 125 mL (approximately 4 ounces) Lactobacillus acidophilus yogurt with 2.5% fructo-oligosaccharides three times daily has also been used. A dose of 450 mL daily of yogurt containing the Causido culture (which contains Enterococcus faecium and two strains of Streptococcus bacteria) has also been used.

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Read more: Allergies, Basics, Cancer, Children, Cholesterol, Diet & Nutrition, Eating for Health, General Health, Health, Natural Remedies, Skin Care, Surprising uses for ..., Women's Health,

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Melissa Breyer

Melissa Breyer is a writer and editor with a background in sustainable living, specializing in food, science and design. She is the co-author of True Food (National Geographic) and has edited and written for regional and international books and periodicals, including The New York Times Magazine. Melissa lives in Brooklyn, NY.

244 comments

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4:38AM PDT on Sep 13, 2013

11 surprising uses for ants?

2:09PM PDT on Sep 11, 2013

Thank you for the information. I will come back to check out the rest later.

9:04AM PDT on Sep 11, 2013

Thanks.

5:03PM PDT on Jul 5, 2013

Thank you

1:12PM PDT on Jul 3, 2013

dzięki za informację i za przepisy

9:04AM PDT on Jul 3, 2013

Thank you for sharing.

6:06AM PDT on Jun 18, 2013

Thanks for sharing this article.

9:15PM PDT on Mar 30, 2013

Great tips - thanks

11:06AM PDT on Mar 26, 2013

Great article.Thanks for sharing

11:20AM PST on Mar 2, 2013

I was wanting a substitute for cream cheese, so straining plain yogurt sounds like a good idea! Plus, I can use organic,an added bonus!

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