11 Ways to Enjoy a Non-GMO Breakfast

Genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, seem to be in everything I like to eat for breakfast: cereal, bread, pancakes and waffles, syrup (if it’s made from corn syrup), even fruit. But given the health and environmental risks posed by GMOs, I’d rather avoid GMO-tainted foods if I can. In honor of October’s Non-GMO Month, I went on a search for at least 11 ways I could enjoy a breakfast that did NOT contain GMO-laced ingredients.

I started by checking with the Non-GMO Project. They’re a non-profit dedicated to “preserving and building the non-GMO food supply, educating consumers and providing non-GMO choices.” One of the biggest contributions they’ve made to a safer, healthier food system is develop the “Non-GMO Project Verified” seal.

The seal indicates food that has been produced according to best practices for GMO avoidance. Generally, it is almost impossible to guarantee that a product is GMO-free, given the level of cross contamination of seeds, pollen and crops that exists just because the wind blows seeds and pollen from one place to another, or birds may eat seeds somewhere and drop them someplace else.

However, the seal does indicate that food producers have met the best available standards for non-GMO production. The Non-GMO Project uses an action threshold of .9 percent, which is aligned with laws in the European Union: any product containing more than 0.9 percent GMO must be so labeled. Like many other labels, the Non-GMO Project Verified seal gives consumers the ability to choose the safest, healthiest foods available when they shop. It also provides a powerful incentive to food producers to shift away from GMOs.

To choose my non-GMO breakfast options, I found this listing of non-GMO certified products extremely helpful. Though it’s hard to find non-GMO food in the conventional grocery stores in my neighborhood, my food co-op and the local natural foods grocery offer many certified choices, including:

* Almond milk and coconut water, as well as certified organic milk

* Orange juice and other fruit juices, as well as vegetable juices

* A long list of organic coffees and some teas

* Bread and buns

* Cookies

* Whole grain and multi grain cereals and granola, plus pancake and waffle mixes

* A variety of flours including rye, spelt, whole wheat, oat and buckwheat

* Fresh and dried fruit

With that in mind, here are 11 non-GMO breakfasts I’m now enjoying. Please note, I have no affiliations with the following products or brands, they are just some of my personal favorites.

1) Cereal and organic milk – Organic milk is supposed to automatically be free of GMOs. To be doubly sure, companies like Stonyfield also get their milk and yogurt non-GMO certified. I buy my milk from a local organic dairy, and make my own yogurt from that milk, so I’ve been pretty safe on that score. Among the many cereal brands that are non-GMO certified are Kashi, Grain Place Foods, Erewhon, Eden, Earth’s Best Organic and Cascadian Farm. One of my favorites has become the Organic Flax Plus Raisin Bran cereal from Nature’s Path Organic. A big bowl of that with milk and I’m good to go until lunch. NOTE: Some brands, like Post and Great Grains, have certified some of their offerings, but not all of them. Look for the non-GMO certified label on the box before you buy.

2) Steel cut oats with toasted nuts and dried cranberries – Bob’s Red Mill offers both quick cooking rolled oats and a variety of different steel cut oats options. Toast some Back to Nature or Braga Organic Farms certified almonds and stir in after the oats are cooked, along with Whole Foods 365 brand dried cranberries.

3) Homemade granola – Make your own granola from the variety of certified oats, nuts and seeds you can find, then chop up and add in organic bake-dried apricot chunks from Bare Snacks or dried California prunes from Big Cal. Use non-GMO honey from Elianni or Glory Bee, and a little oil when you toast the granola from AgStrong or Atlantic. Raw coconut oil from Artisana Organics would work, too.

4) French toast with maple syrup – I make my French toast with day-old bread (usually whole wheat), some eggs, a little milk and vanilla. You should be able to find many non-GMO certified breads, including the Whole Foods 365 brand, Alpine Valley, One Degree Organic Foods and Stonemill. Use organic eggs and milk, plus organic vanilla. Whole Foods’ vanilla is the only one listed by the non-GMO Certified project as being certified, but you may find other options when you shop. You can smother your French toast with fresh fruit, applesauce or, in my case, maple syrup. Cary’s or Coombs Family Farms offers a dark amber maple syrup; however, I get mine straight from a producer in West Virginia whose maple trees are native and honestly, in that case, I don’t worry too much about GMO contamination.

5) Crepes with brown sugar and fresh fruit – I prefer crepes to pancakes because they are lighter and easier to roll up, but either way, you can find non-GMO certified flour from Whole Foods, Arrowhead Mills, Bob’s Red Mill, Grain Place Foods and Grainworks, among many others. Surprisingly, Domino Sugar is on the non-GMO certified list. I generally buy fruit in season that’s local and organically grown on farms that are as careful as they can be about avoiding cross contamination from other GMO crops that might be grown in the region.

6) Scones with a variety of jams – I try tocook and bake “from scratch,” rather than using mixes. But if you prefer a mix, Bona Dea and Immaculate Baking both offer mixes that are non-GMO certified. Some of Bonne Maman’s berry and currant jellies are non-GMO certified, and you can find them in conventional grocery stores. Fruit Me Up from Ambros also sells several varieties of non-GMO fruit sauces, and Cascadian Farm’s non-GMO fruit spreads are available in strawberry, apricot, blackberry, grape and blueberry.

7) Homemade yogurt or yogurt smoothies with fresh fruit – Make your own yogurt from non-GMO certified organic milk. Heat a half-gallon of milk in a glass bowl to 180 degrees (use a candy thermometer to verify the temperature), then let it cool down to about 110 degrees, and add two or three tablespoons of fresh yogurt, plus two tablespoons of powdered milk if you like your yogurt on the thicker side. Keep it in a warm but not hot place (I wrap mine in a heating pad set to low, and cover it with a couple of towels). In about eight hours, you’ll have delicious yogurt, to which you can add toasted nuts, dried fruit and fresh fruit from local organic, non-GMO farmers or the sources already listed above. If you like smoothies, blend togethera cup of yogurt, maybe 4 ice cubes and your choice of fruits. Reserve a couple of tablespoons of yogurt from your batch to make the next batch.

8) Breakfast bar – If you’re rushing around in the morning and don’t have time for a full breakfast, you may want or need a breakfast bar to get you going. The best bars are made from whole grains, a minimum amount of sugar or sweetener and some source of protein; there are also gluten-free options. Looking at all of the ingredients in those that are non-GMO certified, like Amrita, Annie’s Homegrown, Attune, Barbara’s and Bakery on Main, is a good place to start.

9) Eggs, fresh tomatoes and cornbread- How can eggs be non-GMO? Many chickens today are fed an all vegetarian diet, which could include GMO grains, seeds and vegetables. Happily, a growing number of farmers are raising their chickens on organic, uncontaminated feed. Look for the non-GMO certified label on the egg cartons of Whole Foods, Organic Valley, Wild Harvest, NatureFed, Lucky Ladies, and Abbotsford Farms for starters. As an alternative to fruit, I like to eat sliced tomatoes with eggs and toast. I usually buy them in season from the organic farmers at our farmers market. I make cornbread from scratch from non-GMO cornmeal from Grain Millers or Grain Place Foods. The mixes from Hodgson Mill and Cadia are non-GMO certified.

10) Vegetable quiche – When I’m having guests for brunch, I’ll make a vegetable quiche, using organic vegetables like broccoli, kale or spinach, and mushrooms, and a hard cheese like Swiss, Jarlsberg or cheddar from Organic Valley. Rumiano Family Organic Cheese also sells a variety of non-GMO cheeses that include Gouda, Monterey jack, Asiago, Parmesan and Muenster. For the crust, I usuallymake my own using non-GMO flour and butter, but Arnel’s sells a non-GMO certified all purpose flour and pie crust mix.

11) Quinoa – I usually eat quinoa for lunch or dinner, but why not try it for breakfast as well, adding scrambled eggs, sauteed onions and peppers? You can get it non-GMO certified from AlterEco, among others. Here are 25 gluten free quinoa breakfast recipes from MyNaturalFamily.com that include quinoa pumpkin muffins, quinoa granola and a veggie quinoa breakfast bowl.

What other non-GMO certified ingredients do you use to make breakfast? Please share!

 

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63 comments

Siyus Copetallus
Siyus Copetallus1 years ago

Thank you for sharing.

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Elena Poensgen
Elena P1 years ago

Thank you

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Elena Poensgen
Elena P1 years ago

Thank you

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Angela K.
Angela K1 years ago

Thanks for sharing

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Jim Ven
Jim V1 years ago

thanks for the article.

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Tanya W.
Tanya W1 years ago

Does sound yummy

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Tanya W.
Tanya W1 years ago

Thanks for sharing 🍓

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Dorothy Chamberlain

Thanks for sharing - I never thought of scones as a breakfast food, we always have them for tea.

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Nikki Davey
Nikki Davey1 years ago

And I'm sure they're not actually that bad for you.

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Nikki Davey
Nikki Davey1 years ago

Are non-GMO brands not of interest to non-American readers?
So many of your articles are rendered pointless to the rest of the world.

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