12 Top Vegan Iron Sources

If you are a vegan, what is the first argument you hear from meat-eating advocates? Well the sarcastic ones might say something about plants having feelings too, but the most popular rebuttal usually has something to do with iron. And yes iron is an essential mineral because it contributes to the production of blood cells. The human body needs iron to make the oxygen-carrying proteins hemoglobin and myoglobin. But just because you don’t eat meat doesn’t mean you’re going to wither away with anemia.

However, anemia is not something to be taken lightly. (Although I realize I just did.) The World Health Organization considers iron deficiency the number one nutritional disorder in the world. As many as 80 percent of the world’s population may be iron deficient, while 30 percent may have iron deficiency anemia. The human body stores some iron to replace any that is lost. However, low iron levels over a long period of time can lead to iron deficiency anemia. Symptoms include lack of energy, shortness of breath, headache, irritability, dizziness, or weight loss. So here’s the 411 on iron: how much you need, where you can get it, and tips to maximize its absorption.

VeganIron

Iron Requirements
The Food and Nutrition Board at the Institute of Medicine recommends the following:

Infants and children
Younger than 6 months: 0.27 milligrams per day (mg/day)
7 months to 1 year: 11 mg/day
1 to 3 years: 7 mg/day
4 to 8 years: 10 mg/day

Males
9 to 13 years: 8 mg/day
14 to 18 years: 11 mg/day
Age 19 and older: 8 mg/day

Females
9 to 13 years: 8 mg/day
14 to 18 years: 15 mg/day
19 to 50 years: 18 mg/day
51 and older: 8 mg/day

Non-animal iron sources:
Eating red meat and organ meat are the most efficient ways to get iron, but for vegans, obviously, that’s not going to happen. Here are 12 plant-based foods with some of the highest iron levels:

Tofu (1/2 cup): 6.6 mg
Spirulina (1 tsp): 5 mg
Cooked soybeans (1/2 cup): 4.4 mg
Pumpkin seeds (1 ounce): 4.2 mg
Quinoa (4 ounces): 4 mg
Blackstrap molasses (1 tbsp): 4 mg
Tomato paste (4 ounces): 3.9 mg
White beans (1/2 cup) 3.9 mg
Dried apricots (1 cup): 3.5 mg
Cooked spinach (1/2 cup): 3.2 mg
Dried peaches (6 halves): 3.1 mg
Prune juice (8 ounces): 3 mg
Lentils (4 ounces): 3 mg
Peas (1 cup): 2.1 mg

Tips to get the most iron out of your food:

  • Eat iron-rich foods along with foods that contain vitamin C, which helps the body absorb the iron.
  • Tea and coffee contains compounds called polyphenols, which can bind with iron making it harder for our bodies to absorb it.
  • Calcium also hinders the absorption of iron; avoid high-calcium foods for a half hour before or after eating iron-rich foods.
  • Cook in iron pots. The acid in foods seems to pull some of the iron out of the cast-iron pots. Simmering acidic foods, such as tomato sauce, in an iron pot can increase the iron content of the brew more than ten-fold. Cooking foods containing other acids, such as vinegar, red wine, lemon or lime juice, in an iron pot can also increase the iron content of the final mixture.

Do you have iron sources that you depend on not mentioned here? Share them with us in the comment field!

Related:
Vegan Sources of Vitamins & Minerals
21 Sources of Protein for Vegetarians
25 Vegan Sources of Calcium

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468 comments

Elena Poensgen
Elena Poensgenabout a month ago

Thank you

Siyus Copetallus
Siyus Copetallus1 months ago

Thank you for sharing.

Naomi Dreyer
Naomi Dreyer4 months ago

Thanks, good article.
From the Baha’I Faith writings:
"As humanity progresses, meat will be used less and less, ……. When mankind is more fully developed, the eating of meat will gradually cease."
"The food of the future will be fruit and grains. The time will come when meat will no longer be eaten ... our natural food is that which grows out of the ground. The people will gradually develop up to the condition of this natural food." www.bahai.org

Gabrielle DiFonzo
Past Member 4 months ago

What about leeks? Not only are they rich in iron, they're a good source of B vitamins as well. Make sure to use the dark green parts as well as the white stems--the green parts are the most nutritious.

Ake Lindberg
Ake Lindberg4 months ago

Thank you!

Roberto Meritoni
Roberto Meritoni5 months ago

THANKS very INTERESTING .......CIAO ELENA😸

Elena Poensgen
Elena Poensgen5 months ago

Thank you

D.E.A. C.
D.E.A. C.5 months ago

Tomatoes, apricots, peas! I'm there!

Nikki Davey
Nikki Davey5 months ago

The main argument against veganism is that it is extremely difficult to get adequate quantities of all the necessary nutrients from plant sources alone. We evolved as omnivores - eating a bit of everything - and that is the easiest way to stay healthy.

Nikki Davey
Nikki Davey5 months ago

The main argument against veganism is that it is extremely difficult to get adequate quantities of all the necessary nutrients from plant sources alone. We evolved as omnivores - eating a bit of everything - and that is the easiest way to stay healthy.