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4 Factors That Affect Elder Well-Being

4 Factors That Affect Elder Well-Being

Over the next 20 years, the number of people over age 65 is set to nearly double—reaching the 72 million mark by the year 2030, according to a recent federal analysis.

The report was prepared by the Federal Interagency Forum on Aging-Related Statistics, and pinpoints 37 factors that contribute to the comfort and security of the elderly.

These factors include: life expectancy, housing problems, chronic health conditions and level of physical activity, among others.

Here are a few of the report’s more interesting findings:

Rich or poor, older Americans rely on Social Security: Social Security has been the single biggest contributor to adults’ finances since the 1960s—accounting for anywhere from 20 to 84 percent of a given senior’s income.

Common chronic health conditions in the elderly vary by gender: Men were more likely to suffer from diabetes, heart disease and cancer, while women were more often plagued by hypertension, asthma and arthritis.

More seniors get in shape, but obesity is still a problem: While the percentage of seniors meeting the minimum Federal physical activity guidelines has increased over the past twelve years (from 6 percent in 1998 to 11 percent in 2010), the rates of obesity and diabetes have also risen in the older population during this time.

Long-term care expenses are expensive: Seniors living in long-term care facilities pay over four times as much in health care costs than those continuing to live at home ($61,318 per year versus $13,150 per year).

Hospice care use increasing: The number of people turning to hospice for end-of-life care has dramatically increased over the past decade. In 1999, 19.2 percent of Medicare beneficiaries received hospice care in their last month of life. By 2009, this number had increased to 42.6 percent.

Conducted on a bi-annual basis, the Older Americans reports are meant to help policy-makers and elder care providers keep a finger on the pulse of the condition of aging in America.

“Study Identifies and Examines Elements of Senior Well-Being” originally appeared on AgingCare.com.

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Read more: Aging, Healthy Aging, Money, News & Issues, , , , ,

: By Anne-Marie Botek, AgingCare.com Editor

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AgingCare.com

AgingCare.com connects family caregivers and provides support, resources, expert advice and senior housing options for people caring for their elderly parents. AgingCare.com is a trusted resource that visitors rely on every day to find inspiration, make informed decisions, and ease the stress of caregiving.

103 comments

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11:50AM PDT on Sep 29, 2013

It is true that long term care expenses are high! But there is no other way out for seniors experiencing dementia! My grandma had been in a dementia care home, Prestige Care Inc in Oregon for two years, We were confused about how to care her and it was in that context that we found this senior living community. We could give her the right care in her final years and she was happy being there!

3:03AM PDT on Sep 20, 2013

This is why I'm DNR and not full code, when my time comes..let it be.
I seen to much in my line of work to make me not want to live past the age when I can not care for myself, to many sad stories.

9:23AM PDT on Sep 17, 2013

ty

4:55AM PDT on Sep 16, 2013

Thought provoking

4:03PM PDT on Sep 15, 2013

thanks, part of life is growing old.......better than the option???

12:03AM PDT on Sep 15, 2013

Our society has become very anti-senior. Once you are a senior, the world ceases to be friendly or helpful. It seems that everyone just wants you to go away. I don't look forward to becoming a senior, though we should all be able to enjoy that time of life.

4:18PM PDT on Sep 14, 2013

thanx for sharing, sad fact of life as we know it...

12:54PM PDT on Sep 14, 2013

The sad reality is- sometimes things happen in Life that no one is prepared for. The saddest part of getting old -well into past '70's, the less respect people have for you. You start to feel being treated like an imbecile, even if you still possess mental acuity. Relatives feel they have to think for you, even if you are still a thinking individual with a robust social life. Suggestions fly around you that you should give up your home, your independence ,even if realistically- you manage very well without them all year. One visit and they think they can assess your life situation.Some are cursed with children who are ready to sell everything you own, never mind that you are still strong and capable to manage your life.Respect and genuine concern for a senior at times come from caring friends- not family
For me- I'd rather be left alone and I know enough to know when the time comes I need to check into a facility.I do not need a family member nagging me to leave my home- when I do not even see them. I just want my peace and solitude - this is how I will spend my senior years- read. write, play the piano. garden, time with friends. How bad is this???

7:23AM PDT on Sep 14, 2013

thank you

11:51PM PDT on Sep 13, 2013

Depressing.

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Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of
Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

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