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5 Favorite Seaweed Recipes & Their Benefits

White Bean and Asparagus Stew

Get your vegan protein with all the health benefits of asparagus here in one shot.

I tried this recipe out for the first time on two dinner guests. That was rather brave!
They were good friends, and you never know how some people react to beans. Sometimes people get gas unless your take the proper steps. It turned out great!

Ingredients:

1 1/2 cups dry white beans
2 pieces of Wakame (seaweed)
4 bay leaves
1 large onion, chopped finely
1/2 lb. green asparagus, remove woody stems, cut into 2-inch pieces
4 Tbsp vegetable oil or unsalted butter
2 carrots, sliced in rounds
2 pieces celery, chopped
1 – 3 cloves of garlic, chopped
1/4 tsp Liquid dark stevia
1 tsp basil
1 tsp marjoram
2 – 3 Tbsp Tamari or 2 – 3 Tbsp Braggs
1 Tbsp minced fresh parsleyoil
freshly ground black pepperg

Directions:

1.    Cook beans for 1 – 2 hours (time depends on the age of the beans) according to recipe titled “COOKING BEANS”.
2.    When beans are soft, add Wakame, bay leaves, Braggs, Tamari, basil, marjoram and stevia.
3.    Sauté onion, celery and garlic in oil. When golden brown, add to the cooked beans.
4.    Add carrots and asparagus.
5.    Simmer for half an hour or till vegetables are tender.
6.    Mix in parsley and add black pepper to taste.

Soba Soup – Japanese Favorite

If you want a delicious noodle soup recipe that is gluten free, and perhaps even grain free- this is it!
Made with soba buckwheat noodles (look at the label as not all soba is wheat free).

Ingredients:

1 piece Kombu
1 small piece Wakame
1 inch piece ginger root, peeled, and grated
1 onion, chopped
1 carrot, sliced
1/4 – 1/2 lb soba (buckwheat noodles)
1/4 cup mugi miso
3 cups water

Directions:

  1. Wash Kombu and Wakame and place in a pot with the water.
  2. Add the ginger. Bring to a boil and boil gently for 10 – 20 minutes.  Strain, saving Kombu and Wakame.
  3. Rinse off the seaweed. Chop Wakame into 1 inch cubes and return to the pot of water.
  4. Sauté onion till transparent. Add onion to the stock along with the carrot.  Lightly boil for 5 minutes
  5. Add the soba.  Bring to a boil and add 1 cup of cold water.
  6. Repeat this process 3 times –adding a total of 3 cups of water.
  7. Boil lightly for 5 more minutes. Remove from heat.
  8. Add miso to taste (do not cook the miso as it will kill the live enzymes). Let sit with lid on for 5 minutes.
  9. Sprinkle “Fried Tofu” on top.

Miso Soup With Spinach & Mushrooms

We have come to think of Japanese food as being tempura, teriyaki, and sushi–but it is miso soup that the Japanese can’t live without. Originally, miso soup was served as a breakfast food.

I remember the week I had a little Japanese girl visiting who could not speak English. When I made her this soup with the addition of UDON NOODLES she was so happy and said Oishi (delicious) many times!

Ingredients:

1 piece Kombu
1 piece Wakame
4 dried shitake mushrooms*
1 inch piece fresh ginger, chopped
8 Spinach leaves
1 – 3 Tbsp Shiro miso**
3 cups water

Directions:

1.    Soak Kombu, Wakame, and mushrooms in 3 cups of water in a saucepan for 30 minutes.
2.    Bring to a boil.
3.    Simmer for 30 minutes.
4.    Strain out the kombu, wakame and mushrooms saving the liquid.
5.    Slice Wakame and kombu and return to stock.
6.    Cut stocks off mushrooms and discard or chop finely and slice mushroom caps in half.
7.    Place mushrooms back into saved liquid.
8.    Add spinach leaves.
9.    Simmer on medium heat until spinach leaves have wilted.
10.  Add miso. (Never boil miso because that kills extremely beneficial live cultures). Stir the miso thoroughly into the water, and then add this back to the pot. As Miso is high in sodium, adjust how much you add to taste.
Serves 4

*Note: Fresh medium mushrooms can be used.
**This miso is the most suitable as it is smooth and creamy taste…..it has a velvety texture and almost sweet taste.

Related
Health Benefits of Seaweed
5 Super Health Benefits of Sunflower Seeds
12 Ways to Use Uncommon Root Vegetables

Read more: All recipes, Diet & Nutrition, Health,

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Diana Herrington

Diana Herrington turned a debilitating health crisis into a passion for helping others with healthy, sugar-free, gluten-free, eating and cooking. After testing and researching every possible healthy therapy on her delicate system she has developed simple, powerful principles which she shares in her recent book Eating Green and Lean, and as host to Care2 groups: Healthy Living Network and Healthy Cooking. She is the head chef at Real Food for Life, where she shares recipes and tips. Sign up for the Real Food for Life weekly newsletter or catch her on Facebook or Twitter (@DancinginLife).

71 comments

+ add your own
10:02PM PST on Dec 5, 2014

The quality of your articles and contents is great. indian food catering

2:46PM PST on Jan 26, 2014

Thanks! Great post :)

5:03PM PDT on Jul 8, 2013

Would have been nice if article mentioned some distributors who had 'clean' seaweed.

10:55PM PDT on May 21, 2013

This is a really nice article. A must try recipe!

5:04PM PDT on Apr 2, 2013

Something to try . THanks

9:24AM PDT on Apr 1, 2013

must try seaweed sometime! these recipes sound good!

10:48PM PDT on Mar 23, 2013

Be mindful of the store & some restaurant (buffets) that serve dyed/colored seaweed! Some have the Yellow #5 & Blue #1 which are not good for you. I found this article on what to look for as far as sushi restaurants go to be very helpful. http://foodbabe.com/2011/06/06/sushi-secrets/ Plus this article goes hand in hand with this Care 2 article on the benefits of salt-water edibles. http://www.juliesrawambition.com/2008/04/the-power-of-sea-vegetables/

9:52PM PDT on Mar 22, 2013

MMMmmm! I love seaweed. Yet it seems to have some sort of taboo amongst others as being not ideal for appetite. But I'm going to try some of the recipes. Thanks!

9:21PM PDT on Mar 22, 2013

no ty but tyvm for the recipes

4:12PM PDT on Mar 22, 2013

Love adding seaweeds to my diet. Nori is a particular favorite.

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Nice to read this article will be very helpful in the future, share more info with us. Good job!

Thanks. Most of these suggestions are workable and gratifying. Another idea might be to bring in a s…

Helpful information, thanks.

This is good to know! Thanks!

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