START A PETITION 27,000,000 members: the world's largest community for good
START A PETITION
x

5 Things You Should Know About Rosh Hashanah

5 Things You Should Know About Rosh Hashanah

At sundown on September 4, the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah, begins.

Rosh Hashanah literally means “Head of the New Year.” But, this isn’t your typical New Year’s Eve celebration where you drink all you can and party. Instead, it marks the beginning of a 10-day period of prayer, personal self-reflection, and repentance, known as the Ten Days of Awe, beginning with Rosh Hashanah and concluding with Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement.

Even on such a serious holiday, there are elements of joy and celebration, and like all other Jewish holidays, Rosh Hashanah also has its own customs. Here are some of them and some of the symbols to know about this very important holiday.

Rosh Hashanah includes a ritual of blowing on the shofar or ram’s horn, to remind Jews about the significance of this day, and it serves as a wakeup call to repent. That’s why it is also known as the day of the blowing of the horn.

It is customary to extend good wishes for a good year. The typical greeting for Rosh Hashanah is the simple “L’shana Tovah” or Happy New Year.

The foods that are eaten have special meaning on this holiday. The challah (twisted egg bread) is baked into round loaves instead of the typical oblong loaf to represent the circle of life and the continuous seasons of the year. Apples are dipped in honey to symbolize the hopes and wishes for sweetness in the year ahead.

One popular custom is asting off“ or Tashlikh, which is going to a flowing body of water like a creek, river or an ocean and symbolically throwing away your sins. This is done by emptying your pockets which are usually filled with small pieces of bread to cast off.

Rosh Hashanah emphasizes that repentance is possible. While the holiday is ultimately about asking God to forgive your sins, it’s also about seeking forgiveness from other human beings. To really repent, we have to go beyond just admitting our wrongs, to making a commitment to really change our behavior. This is a time for taking stock and asking ourselves what are we doing in our lives. How are we treating other people? Who have we hurt? What mistakes have we made? And it is time to ask them for forgiveness. It is ultimately an optimistic time because it emphasizes that all people are capable of not just exploring, but transforming, their lives.

Send a Rosh Hashanah eCard

Read more: Family, Holidays, Life, Other Holidays, , ,

quick poll

vote now!

Loading poll...

have you shared this story yet?

go ahead, give it a little love

Judi Gerber

Judi Gerber is a University of California Master Gardener with a certificate in Horticultural Therapy. She writes about sustainable farming, local foods, and organic gardening for multiple magazines. Her book Farming in Torrance and the South Bay was released in September 2008.

74 comments

+ add your own
12:27AM PDT on Oct 2, 2013

Those practices sound noble ......... Also thought-provoking to think about what Rosh Hashanah truly means.

It was interesting listening to the Iranian 'govt minister' who accompanied Rouhani to the USA recently. He was interviewed by Fareed Zakaria - possibly the most professional of TV presenters. The fact that he is Jewish must have confused all the anti-Iranians. He spoke about all the Jewish schools, temples, stores, etc in Iran. The media prefers to portray Iran negatively - all the time.

5:19PM PDT on Oct 1, 2013

Thank you Judi, for Sharing this!

2:02AM PDT on Oct 1, 2013

Thank you :)

6:32AM PDT on Sep 9, 2013

Thanks for the explanation. My grdd is marrying a Messianic Jew, they'll incorporate both religions into their lives.

9:36AM PDT on Sep 6, 2013

Very interesting.

11:23PM PDT on Sep 5, 2013

Thank you for posting this, although I'm not Jewish, I do like learning about other religions and cultures, and I had been hearing a lot about Rosh Hashanah, so its good that I know what it is actually all about now :)

10:37PM PDT on Sep 5, 2013

L'shana Tova!

10:21PM PDT on Sep 5, 2013

Thanks.

10:19PM PDT on Sep 5, 2013

Ah, seriously, L’shana Tovah to those who celebrate and generally good wishes to all. I just hate it when someone's ignorant kneejerk response is to label everything different from their orwn narrow point of reference as dumb or silly.

I did the Tashlikh ritual once at a ritual given by a Goddess-worshipping Jewish woman. I'd never heard of it until just before we did it, but I went with it and felt out what meaning it might have for me.

10:14PM PDT on Sep 5, 2013

I'm glad I'm not Melissa F....she seems dumb.

add your comment



Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of
Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

people are talking

Odd but cute. Thanks.

I've only had small/medium-sized poodles all my life. Apart from being extremely intelligent and e…

Good info. I may try it for a few months to see if there is any difference in a couple areas.

CONTACT THE EDITORS



Select names from your address book   |   Help
   

We hate spam. We do not sell or share the email addresses you provide.