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6 Alternatives to 87,000 Slices of Bread

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Starches and Grains

White Potatoes: The average American will consume 20,000 potatoes in his or her lifetime. But why not? Potatoes are satisfyingly filling, and are packed with fiber, vitamin C, manganese and potassium. And there are countless versatile ways to prepare them, from baked to mashed to latkes. Just stay away from the fried ones.

Rice: This one is a no-brainer, since so much of the world populationís diet is based on rice. When combined with a legume, whole grain brown rice forms a complete protein providing the body with necessary amino acids. Lundberg Family Farms is a Sacramento-based rice producer which offers certified organic and eco farmed varieties of rice. You can read about their sustainabity practices here. Also, since Lundberg rice is packaged in a dedicated facility, there are no worries about cross-contamination.

Millet: Millet is a fantastic, overlooked source of magnanese, tryptophan, magnesium and phosphorus. While it is technically a seed, it is usually prepared as a grain that can be eaten in place of rice. And did you know that sprouted millet and cashews can be used to make vegan yogurt? Just beware that millet is not gluten-free, so if you are a celiac, this oneís off limits.

Amaranth: This overlooked grain-like food, is actually an herb. When it comes to a showdown with wheat, amaranth is the clear winner, with five times the amount of iron and three times the amount of fiber. And yes, protein-rich amaranth is gluten-free. To prepare, use a 3:1 water:amaranath ratio.

Next, Sprouted Grain Breads

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Read more: Eating for Health, Food, , , ,

By Gina Munsey, Eat. Drink. Better

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29 comments

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4:16AM PDT on Jun 24, 2012

Having been taken off bread due to diabetes I found that rice cakes, rice noodles and rice itself fill the void. I don't miss bread at all. I like all your alternatives. Thank you.

8:49AM PDT on Apr 26, 2012

great ideas

10:28PM PST on Feb 1, 2010

Thanks.

11:08PM PDT on Jun 18, 2009

I believe that bread of various kinds, including wheat, in right proportions is the answer to our (refined) flour based staple. I must say, in India, most people in Northern parts except hills base their diet on 'chapati', commonly called Indian bread or 'roti' in the West. We Punjabis love corn bread with cooked green mustard leaves (sarson ka saag) with plenty of ginger, garlic and aesfotida which makes a great diet for the winters but I lament our propensity for over-indulgence resulring in all 'waste going to our waists'.

Many thanks for suggesting the alternatives and I intend giving these alternatives a good publicity amongst my friends but shall advise them to find out what is the best proportion for each one of them from amnogst the suggested alternatives. I should think that the alternatives will provide the necessary variety to the adventurous palate of foodies as also the satisfaction of deriving benefits a wholesome and nutritious diet.

Best wishes to all.

11:06PM PDT on Jun 18, 2009

I believe that bread of various kinds, including wheat, in right proportions is the answer to our (refined) flour based staple. I must say, in India, most people in Northern parts except hills base their diet on 'chapati', commonly called Indian bread or 'roti' in the West. We Punjabis love corn bread with cooked green mustard leaves (sarson ka saag) with plenty of ginger, garlic and aesfotida which makes a great diet for the winters but I lament our propensity for over-indulgence resulring in all waste going to our waists.

Many thanks for suggesting the alternatives and I intend giving these alternatives a good publicity amongst my friends but am going to advise hem to find out what is the best proportion for each one of them amnogst the suggested alternatives. I should think that alternatives will provide the necessary variety to the adventure palate of foodies as also the satisfaction of deriving benefits a wholesome and nutritious diet.

Best wishes to all.

4:11PM PDT on Jun 5, 2009

How exciting to see all the feedback this story has generated! Thanks for taking the time to express yourself.

I’m not advocating that everyone gives up wheat. My goal is to encourage us to become more conscious and intentional food consumers — to stop and think about where our food comes from and exactly what it is before we eat it. I am advocating thoughtful — rather than thoughtless — consumption.

7:57AM PDT on Jun 4, 2009

Ok. Let's get this straight - and *please* fix it in the article.
Millet is gluten free.
It is an important grain for coeliacs.
I refer to the Australian Coeliac Society Handbook, page 13.
"Gluten free grains & starches INCLUDE: maize/corn, rice, sago, tapioca/arrowroot, buckwheat, MILLET, amaranth, quinoa, potato, soy, legume flours (eg chickpea or lentil)"

Please do not spread misinformation about this serious condition.

5:25AM PDT on Jun 4, 2009

I'm a sandwich-lover, I choose my bread wisely, I vary my diet to get a good mix of nutrients. Don't demonize everything! Pomegranates are great for you but expensive and I don't think they are grown anywhere near where I live - so I've got to weigh health benefits against eco-destruction. Making healthy choices is tough enough without crap articles like this one.

2:29PM PDT on Jun 3, 2009

Thank you!

2:18PM PDT on Jun 3, 2009

Yes, Thanks!

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