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6 Alternatives to 87,000 Slices of Bread

Gluten-Free Breads

For those with celiac disease or gluten-intolerance though, thereís a catch. The grains most often used in sprouted breads ó kamut, spelt, barley and rye ó arenít gluten-free. In fact, I have yet to find a wheat-free sprouted grain bread that is also gluten-free. But donít despair. This doesnít mean gluten-free breads donít exist. Companies like Food for Life and Ener-G offer a wide selection of delicious gluten-free breads made from rice and tapioca flours. And donít forget all the variations of baked goods you can create using your own wheat-free, gluten-free flour blend.

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By Gina Munsey, Eat. Drink. Better

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29 comments

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4:16AM PDT on Jun 24, 2012

Having been taken off bread due to diabetes I found that rice cakes, rice noodles and rice itself fill the void. I don't miss bread at all. I like all your alternatives. Thank you.

8:49AM PDT on Apr 26, 2012

great ideas

10:28PM PST on Feb 1, 2010

Thanks.

11:08PM PDT on Jun 18, 2009

I believe that bread of various kinds, including wheat, in right proportions is the answer to our (refined) flour based staple. I must say, in India, most people in Northern parts except hills base their diet on 'chapati', commonly called Indian bread or 'roti' in the West. We Punjabis love corn bread with cooked green mustard leaves (sarson ka saag) with plenty of ginger, garlic and aesfotida which makes a great diet for the winters but I lament our propensity for over-indulgence resulring in all 'waste going to our waists'.

Many thanks for suggesting the alternatives and I intend giving these alternatives a good publicity amongst my friends but shall advise them to find out what is the best proportion for each one of them from amnogst the suggested alternatives. I should think that the alternatives will provide the necessary variety to the adventurous palate of foodies as also the satisfaction of deriving benefits a wholesome and nutritious diet.

Best wishes to all.

11:06PM PDT on Jun 18, 2009

I believe that bread of various kinds, including wheat, in right proportions is the answer to our (refined) flour based staple. I must say, in India, most people in Northern parts except hills base their diet on 'chapati', commonly called Indian bread or 'roti' in the West. We Punjabis love corn bread with cooked green mustard leaves (sarson ka saag) with plenty of ginger, garlic and aesfotida which makes a great diet for the winters but I lament our propensity for over-indulgence resulring in all waste going to our waists.

Many thanks for suggesting the alternatives and I intend giving these alternatives a good publicity amongst my friends but am going to advise hem to find out what is the best proportion for each one of them amnogst the suggested alternatives. I should think that alternatives will provide the necessary variety to the adventure palate of foodies as also the satisfaction of deriving benefits a wholesome and nutritious diet.

Best wishes to all.

4:11PM PDT on Jun 5, 2009

How exciting to see all the feedback this story has generated! Thanks for taking the time to express yourself.

I’m not advocating that everyone gives up wheat. My goal is to encourage us to become more conscious and intentional food consumers — to stop and think about where our food comes from and exactly what it is before we eat it. I am advocating thoughtful — rather than thoughtless — consumption.

7:57AM PDT on Jun 4, 2009

Ok. Let's get this straight - and *please* fix it in the article.
Millet is gluten free.
It is an important grain for coeliacs.
I refer to the Australian Coeliac Society Handbook, page 13.
"Gluten free grains & starches INCLUDE: maize/corn, rice, sago, tapioca/arrowroot, buckwheat, MILLET, amaranth, quinoa, potato, soy, legume flours (eg chickpea or lentil)"

Please do not spread misinformation about this serious condition.

5:25AM PDT on Jun 4, 2009

I'm a sandwich-lover, I choose my bread wisely, I vary my diet to get a good mix of nutrients. Don't demonize everything! Pomegranates are great for you but expensive and I don't think they are grown anywhere near where I live - so I've got to weigh health benefits against eco-destruction. Making healthy choices is tough enough without crap articles like this one.

2:29PM PDT on Jun 3, 2009

Thank you!

2:18PM PDT on Jun 3, 2009

Yes, Thanks!

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Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of
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