6 Reasons To Make a Chandelier for the Birds

Want a free ticket to a natural outdoor theatre for your whole family? Just feed the birds and let their beauty entertain you all winter long.

Why bird watch?

1. Connect with nature
It is a well-documented fact that wildlife can help people feel connected to nature.

2. Gain knowledge
Ornithology can be an endless learning opportunity. The Audubon Society is dedicated to conserving and restoring natural ecosystems, focusing on birds, other wildlife, and their habitats for the benefit of humanity and the earth’s biological diversity.

3. Improve your health
Feeding the birds gets you outside and brings the outside environment in. The connection to nature can also have a calming effect.

4. Make friends
Join a bird watching club and meet people. Here is a list of bird watching clubs in the US.

5. It’s inexpensive
Along with buying or making (see next page) food to feed the birds, all you need to get started is a field guide to identify the birds and binoculars to get a birds-eye view of all of the action.

6. Enjoy solitude
Watching birds is deeply satisfying; it opens up your senses, and it is something enjoyable that you can do by yourself.

Next: DIY Bird Chandelier

DIY Bird Chandelier

This orange-and-cranberry feeder, compliments of CasaSugar will attract birds such as orioles, woodpeckers, finches, thrashers, mockingbirds, and tanagers to your yard.

What you need:

baking sheet
8 to 10 oranges, cut into 27 to 30 slices
thread and ribbon
glue gun
embroidery hoop
cinnamon (optional)

What to do:

1. The night before assembly, you need to dry your oranges. Slice oranges about 1/4 inch thick, and lay flat – either directly on the oven rack or on a baking sheet. Bake at 250 degrees F for three to four hours, largely unattended. You can flip the oranges halfway through to make sure they are drying evenly. If you want to keep your chandelier inside, brush cinnamon on the orange slices before baking. This will release a yummy cinnamon smell in your house the entire time the chandelier is up.
2. After the oranges have dried, take out a spool of ribbon, and cut nine pieces of ribbon three inches long. Then cut 18 pieces of ribbon at one inch lengths.
3. With the ribbon, measure out an additional three nine-inch lengths, and then cut three pieces. Tie them 1/3 of the way around the embroidery hoop, so you have the three ribbons evenly spaced. Pull the three pieces even, above the hoop, and tie in a loop for hanging.
4. Now, take your cut orange slices and make nine to 10 chandelier strands, with three orange slices per strand. Use the glue gun to glue the longest ribbon to the top orange slice, and then the shorter one-inch ribbon to each of the next two slices. Lay flat to dry, until you have all of the slices glued and strung.
5. Now, thread a needle and make a strand of cranberries for your middle chandelier strand. Set aside.
6. With the embroidery hoop hanging securely from a hook, take each of the strands of orange slices and loop them over the wood of the hoop. Glue the top, longer ribbon onto itself, going over the embroidery hoop. Space the strands of oranges evenly around the hoop.
7. Hang the cranberry strand from the middle of the knotted ribbon, at the top of the chandelier.
8. Now, display your finished product either outside for your bird friends or over a dinner table. Just make sure to transfer it outside for the birdies to enjoy when you are done!
Do you feed the birds? What birds come to your feeders during the winter months?

Look here to view all of CasaSugar’s photos of the Bird Chandelier.

Photo Credit: CasaSugar

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Teresa W.
Teresa W.1 years ago


Julie Botsch
Julie Botsch1 years ago

Thank You.

Elaina V.
Elana V.1 years ago

I would love to add this to my yard outside. Thanks for the great project idea!

Lisa Gourley
Lisa Gourley2 years ago


Autumn S.
Autumn Away S.2 years ago

What a great idea, thanks

Yulan Lawson
Yulan Lawson2 years ago

I love bird watching and take many photos, there so much fun and sound divine.

Danuta Watola
Danuta Watola2 years ago

Thanks for sharing

Prochi T.
Prochi T.4 years ago

Sweet poem Elizabeth.

Lita C.
pat a.4 years ago

I don't think birds will eat dried orange slices. In my birding community, we use fresh orange halves and bananas for mockingbirds.

Nancy Sasko
Nancy Sasko4 years ago