START A PETITION 25,136,189 members: the world's largest community for good
START A PETITION
x

A Recipe for Vitamin C-Rich Sun Tea

A Recipe for Vitamin C-Rich Sun Tea

According to Gardenista editor Erin, making sun tea is kind of like cheating. In the best way. It sounds fancy and tastes delicious, but requires less effort than you’d think.

This recipe is from resident natural beauty expert, Jessa Blades. It’s a bright, floral variation on the iced tea you’re probably already drinking. Sweetened with a brown sugar and chamomile syrup and packed with vitamin C-rich hibiscus and rose petals, this version is as tasty as it is nutritional. It’s also showstoppingly pretty.

Above: Dried hibiscus and rose petals make a ruby-colored sun tea. All photos by Erin Boyle.

Summer Goddess Sun Tea

  • Equal parts dried rose and hibiscus flowers, blended
  • 1-3 teaspoons of flowers per 8 oz of water

Brew sun tea by leaving a jar of water and flower petals in a sunny window for an hour or two. The hibiscus imparts its flavor quickly, so the tea doesn’t take long to brew. A caveat: there’s some risk of bacteria growth when making sun tea. If you think you’ll leave your tea out for more than a couple of hours, consider brewing it overnight in the refrigerator instead, or making it the old-fashioned way with boiling water. If you use boiling water, pour it over dried flowers, cover, and let sit for 10 minutes before straining.

Brown Sugar Chamomile Syrup

  • 1 cup organic brown sugar
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 cup dried chamomile flowers

In a medium saucepan combine sugar and water. Bring to a boil, stirring until the sugar has dissolved. Remove from heat and add chamomile flowers and cover with a lid. Jessa likes to add one cup of flowers for a strong chamomile flavor. If you prefer a more subtle flavor, add just a half cup of flowers. Allow to cool and then strain into a clean container and enjoy. Syrup can be refrigerated for up to one month.

Sweeten your sun tea to taste and enjoy (preferably from your spot in a Nap-Worthy Hammock).

 

Read more: Drinks, Eating for Health, Food, Gardenista, Natural Remedies, Surprising uses for ..., , , , , ,

have you shared this story yet?

go ahead, give it a little love

Gardenista

Gardenista is a one-stop sourcebook for cultivated living, a guide to outdoor design and gardening. Helmed by former New York Times columnist Michelle Slatalla, Gardenista features inspiration, garden visits, and advice for all things outdoor living, from patios and peonies, to tables and terraces. Gardens matter, and Gardenista celebrates tomatoes on the fire escape as much as rolling acres of green.

85 comments

+ add your own
12:51PM PDT on Aug 27, 2013

Thanks sounds good

1:18PM PDT on Aug 25, 2013

I prefer tea without any sweetener.

10:53AM PDT on Aug 25, 2013

sunny

12:35PM PDT on Aug 23, 2013

Thank you!!

3:53PM PDT on Aug 22, 2013

ty

1:21PM PDT on Aug 22, 2013

Thanks.

7:06AM PDT on Aug 21, 2013

:) Thankyou

6:55AM PDT on Aug 21, 2013

ty

1:37PM PDT on Aug 20, 2013

Thanks, no sugar in my tea.

9:22AM PDT on Aug 20, 2013

thanks

add your comment



Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of
Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

people are talking

I have 2 dogs (one with an EXTREMELY high prey drive), between 65-70 pounds. I have learned, throug…

I use blue ice containers in my bed to cool the sheets- opposite of using a hot water bottle in the …

Sorry, but my life does not revolve around how many steps I take! Count every step I take?? Not li…

I hate to say Guilty, but with 6 ( 5 dogs and a cat) It's hard not to have a favourite..

Story idea? Want to blog? Contact the editors!



Select names from your address book   |   Help
   

We hate spam. We do not sell or share the email addresses you provide.