Are Canned Beans as Healthy as Cooked Beans?

Beans are an essential part of any healthful diet. The federal government recommends about half a cup a day of beans, counting them as both a protein and a vegetable since they have the best of both worlds. Beans are excellent sources of fiber, folate, plant protein, plant iron, vitamin B1, and minerals such as magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, and copper, all while being naturally low in sodium.

Yet Americans don’t know beans: 96% of Americans don’t even make the measly minimum recommended intake of beans, chickpeas, split peas or lentils. The same percentage of Americans don’t eat their greens every day. Two of the healthiest foods on the planet are greens and beans, but hardly anyone even consumes the minimum recommended amount. As a team of researchers from the National Cancer Institute noted, this is just another “piece added to the rather disturbing picture that is emerging of a nation’s diet in crisis.”

But how should we get our beans? Canned beans are convenient, but are they as nutritious as home-cooked? And if we do used canned, should we drain them or not? A recent study published in Food and Nutrition Sciences spilled the beans.

In addition to their health benefits, beans are cheap. The researchers did a little bean counting, and a serving of beans costs between 10 cents and, if you want to go crazy, 40 cents.

The researchers compiled a table of the cost per serving of beans, both canned and cooked (see the above video). As you can see, canned beans cost about 3 times more than dried beans, but dried beans can take hours to cook, so my family splurges on canned beans, paying the extra 20 cents a serving. Nutrition-wise, cooked and canned are about the same, but the sodium content of canned beans can be 100 times that of cooked. Draining and rinsing the canned beans can get rid of about half the sodium, but you’re also draining and rinsing away some of the nutrition.  I recommend, when buying canned beans, to instead get the no-salt added varieties, and to keep and use the bean juice.

The bottom line is that beans, regardless of type or form, are a nutrient rich food and should be encouraged as part of an overall healthy diet.

Concerned about gas? See my blog post Beans and Gas: Clearing the air.

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

PS: If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my free videos here and watch my live year-in-review presentations Uprooting the Leading Causes of Death and More Than an Apple a Day.

Why You Should Eat More Beans
How Much Soy Is Too Much?
Breast Cancer Survival and Soy

Love This? Never Miss Another Story.


Jayasri Amma
Jayasri Ammaabout a year ago

Thank you!

Helga Ganguly
Helga Ganguly1 years ago

Black beans,red beans,beans who don't jump.

Janice Thompson
Janice Thompson1 years ago

Beans, Beans, the musical fruit,
The more you eat, the more you toot.

That's what we do naturally, get used to it.

The older you get, the less it sounds, mainly cause your hearing is going...

Love my beans and cornbread!

Kristina May
Kristina May1 years ago

I cook my dried beans in the crockpot it makes them super tender. You can have them ready to go the night before put them on on the morning and they will be ready by supper time with no fuss.

Anne K.
Anne K.1 years ago

Thank you!

Siti R.
Siti R.1 years ago

Bean me Up!!!

Melania Padilla
Melania Padilla1 years ago

Love beans, I eat lots. But we have the natural ones, not canned :)

Tanya W.
Tanya W.1 years ago


Elena T.
Elena Poensgen1 years ago

Thank you :)

Sue L.
Sue L.1 years ago

I have been eating a bigger variety of foods lately, including more beans. They are delicious, nutritious, and cheap. A winning combination!